Econstudentlog

A few diabetes papers of interest

i. Thirty Years of Research on the Dawn Phenomenon: Lessons to Optimize Blood Glucose Control in Diabetes.

“More than 30 years ago in Diabetes Care, Schmidt et al. (1) defined “dawn phenomenon,” the night-to-morning elevation of blood glucose (BG) before and, to a larger extent, after breakfast in subjects with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Shortly after, a similar observation was made in type 2 diabetes (T2D) (2), and the physiology of glucose homeostasis at night was studied in normal, nondiabetic subjects (35). Ever since the first description, the dawn phenomenon has been studied extensively with at least 187 articles published as of today (6). […] what have we learned from the last 30 years of research on the dawn phenomenon? What is the appropriate definition, the identified mechanism(s), the importance (if any), and the treatment of the dawn phenomenon in T1D and T2D?”

“Physiology of glucose homeostasis in normal, nondiabetic subjects indicates that BG and plasma insulin concentrations remain remarkably flat and constant overnight, with a modest, transient increase in insulin secretion just before dawn (3,4) to restrain hepatic glucose production (4) and prevent hyperglycemia. Thus, normal subjects do not exhibit the dawn phenomenon sensu strictiori because they secrete insulin to prevent it.

In T1D, the magnitude of BG elevation at dawn first reported was impressive and largely secondary to the decrease of plasma insulin concentration overnight (1), commonly observed with evening administration of NPH or lente insulins (8) (Fig. 1). Even in early studies with intravenous insulin by the “artificial pancreas” (Biostator) (2), plasma insulin decreased overnight because of progressive inactivation of insulin in the pump (9). This artifact exaggerated the dawn phenomenon, now defined as need for insulin to limit fasting hyperglycemia (2). When the overnight waning of insulin was prevented by continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) […] or by the long-acting insulin analogs (LA-IAs) (8), it was possible to quantify the real magnitude of the dawn phenomenon — 15–25 mg/dL BG elevation from nocturnal nadir to before breakfast […]. Nocturnal spikes of growth hormone secretion are the most likely mechanism of the dawn phenomenon in T1D (13,14). The observation from early pioneering studies in T1D (1012) that insulin sensitivity is higher after midnight until 3 a.m. as compared to the period 4–8 a.m., soon translated into use of more physiological replacement of basal insulin […] to reduce risk of nocturnal hypoglycemia while targeting fasting near-normoglycemia”.

“In T2D, identification of diurnal changes in BG goes back decades, but only quite recently fasting hyperglycemia has been attributed to a transient increase in hepatic glucose production (both glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis) at dawn in the absence of compensatory insulin secretion (1517). Monnier et al. (7) report on the overnight (interstitial) glucose concentration (IG), as measured by continuous ambulatory IG monitoring, in three groups of 248 subjects with T2D […] Importantly, the dawn phenomenon had an impact on mean daily IG and A1C (mean increase of 0.39% [4.3 mmol/mol]), which was independent of treatment. […] Two messages from the data of Monnier et al. (7) are important. First, the dawn phenomenon is confirmed as a frequent event across the heterogeneous population of T2D independent of (oral) treatment and studied in everyday life conditions, not only in the setting of specialized clinical research units. Second, the article reaffirms that the primary target of treatment in T2D is to reestablish near-normoglycemia before and after breakfast (i.e., to treat the dawn phenomenon) to lower mean daily BG and A1C (8). […] the dawn phenomenon induces hyperglycemia not only before, but, to a larger extent, after breakfast as well (7,18). Over the years, fasting (and postbreakfast) hyperglycemia in T2D worsens as result of progressively impaired pancreatic B-cell function on the background of continued insulin resistance primarily at dawn (8,1518) and independently of age (19). Because it is an early metabolic abnormality leading over time to the vicious circle of “hyperglycemia begets hyperglycemia” by glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity, the dawn phenomenon in T2D should be treated early and appropriately before A1C continues to increase (20).”

“Oral medications do not adequately control the dawn phenomenon, even when given in combination (7,18). […] The evening replacement of basal insulin, which abolishes the dawn phenomenon by restraining hepatic glucose production and lipolysis (21), is an effective treatment as it mimics the physiology of glucose homeostasis in normal, nondiabetic subjects (4). Early use of basal insulin in T2D is an add-on option treatment after failure of metformin to control A1C <7.0% (20). However, […] it would be wise to consider initiation of basal insulin […] before — not after — A1C has increased well beyond 7.0%, as usually it is done in practice currently.”

ii. Peripheral Neuropathy in Adolescents and Young Adults With Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes From the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Follow-up Cohort.

“Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is among the most distressing of all the chronic complications of diabetes and is a cause of significant disability and poor quality of life (4). Depending on the patient population and diagnostic criteria, the prevalence of DPN among adults with diabetes ranges from 30 to 70% (57). However, there are insufficient data on the prevalence and predictors of DPN among the pediatric population. Furthermore, early detection and good glycemic control have been proven to prevent or delay adverse outcomes associated with DPN (5,8,9). Near-normal control of blood glucose beginning as soon as possible after the onset of diabetes may delay the development of clinically significant nerve impairment (8,9). […] The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends screening for DPN in children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes at diagnosis and 5 years after diagnosis for those with type 1 diabetes, followed by annual evaluations thereafter, using simple clinical tests (10). Since subclinical signs of DPN may precede development of frank neuropathic symptoms, systematic, preemptive screening is required in order to identify DPN in its earliest stages.

There are various measures that can be used for the assessment of DPN. The Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI) is a simple, sensitive, and specific tool for the screening of DPN (11). It was validated in large independent cohorts (12,13) and has been widely used in clinical trials and longitudinal cohort studies […] The aim of this pilot study was to provide preliminary estimates of the prevalence of and factors associated with DPN among children and adolescents with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.”

“A total of 399 youth (329 with type 1 and 70 with type 2 diabetes) participated in the pilot study. Youth with type 1 diabetes were younger (mean age 15.7 ± 4.3 years) and had a shorter duration of diabetes (mean duration 6.2 ± 0.9 years) compared with youth with type 2 diabetes (mean age 21.6 ± 4.1 years and mean duration 7.6 ± 1.8 years). Participants with type 2 diabetes had a higher BMI z score and waist circumference, were more likely to be smokers, and had higher blood pressure and lipid levels than youth with type 1 diabetes (all P < 0.001). A1C, however, did not significantly differ between the two groups (mean A1C 8.8 ± 1.8% [73 ± 2 mmol/mol] for type 1 diabetes and 8.5 ± 2.9% [72 ± 3 mmol/mol] for type 2 diabetes; P = 0.5) but was higher than that recommended by the ADA for this age-group (A1C ≤7.5%) (10). The prevalence of DPN (defined as the MNSIE score >2) was 8.2% among youth with type 1 diabetes and 25.7% among those with type 2 diabetes. […] Youth with DPN were older and had a longer duration of diabetes, greater central obesity (increased waist circumference), higher blood pressure, an atherogenic lipid profile (low HDL cholesterol and marginally high triglycerides), and microalbuminuria. A1C […] was not significantly different between those with and without DPN (9.0% ± 2.0 […] vs. 8.8% ± 2.1 […], P = 0.58). Although nearly 37% of youth with type 2 diabetes came from lower-income families with annual income <25,000 USD per annum (as opposed to 11% for type 1 diabetes), socioeconomic status was not significantly associated with DPN (P = 0.77).”

“In the unadjusted logistic regression model, the odds of having DPN was nearly four times higher among those with type 2 diabetes compared with youth with type 1 diabetes (odds ratio [OR] 3.8 [95% CI 1.9–7.5, P < 0.0001). This association was attenuated, but remained significant, after adjustment for age and sex (OR 2.3 [95% CI 1.1–5.0], P = 0.03). However, this association was no longer significant (OR 2.1 [95% CI 0.3–15.9], P = 0.47) when additional covariates […] were added to the model […] The loss of the association between diabetes type and DPN with addition of covariates in the fully adjusted model could be due to power loss, given the small number of youth with DPN in the sample, or indicative of stronger associations between these covariates and DPN such that conditioning on them eliminates the observed association between DPN and diabetes type.”

“The prevalence of DPN among type 1 diabetes youth in our pilot study is lower than that reported by Eppens et al. (15) among 1,433 Australian adolescents with type 1 diabetes assessed by thermal threshold testing and VPT (prevalence of DPN 27%; median age and duration 15.7 and 6.8 years, respectively). A much higher prevalence was also reported among Danish (62.5%) and Brazilian (46%) cohorts of type 1 diabetes youth (16,17) despite a younger age (mean age among Danish children 13.7 years and Brazilian cohort 12.9 years). The prevalence of DPN among youth with type 2 diabetes (26%) found in our study is comparable to that reported among the Australian cohort (21%) (15). The wide ranges in the prevalence estimates of DPN among the young cannot solely be attributed to the inherent racial/ethnic differences in this population but could potentially be due to the differing criteria and diagnostic tests used to define and characterize DPN.”

“In our study, the duration of diabetes was significantly longer among those with DPN, but A1C values did not differ significantly between the two groups, suggesting that a longer duration with its sustained impact on peripheral nerves is an important determinant of DPN. […] Cho et al. (22) reported an increase in the prevalence of DPN from 14 to 28% over 17 years among 819 Australian adolescents with type 1 diabetes aged 11–17 years at baseline, despite improvements in care and minor improvements in A1C (8.2–8.7%). The prospective Danish Study Group of Diabetes in Childhood also found no association between DPN (assessed by VPT) and glycemic control (23).”

“In conclusion, our pilot study found evidence that the prevalence of DPN in adolescents with type 2 diabetes approaches rates reported in adults with diabetes. Several CVD risk factors such as central obesity, elevated blood pressure, dyslipidemia, and microalbuminuria, previously identified as predictors of DPN among adults with diabetes, emerged as independent predictors of DPN in this young cohort and likely accounted for the increased prevalence of DPN in youth with type 2 diabetes.

iii. Disturbed Eating Behavior and Omission of Insulin in Adolescents Receiving Intensified Insulin Treatment.

“Type 1 diabetes appears to be a risk factor for the development of disturbed eating behavior (DEB) (1,2). Estimates of the prevalence of DEB among individuals with type 1 diabetes range from 10 to 49% (3,4), depending on methodological issues such as the definition and measurement of DEB. Some studies only report the prevalence of full-threshold diagnoses of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and eating disorders not otherwise specified, whereas others also include subclinical eating disorders (1). […] Although different terminology complicates the interpretation of prevalence rates across studies, the findings are sufficiently robust to indicate that there is a higher prevalence of DEB in type 1 diabetes compared with healthy controls. A meta-analysis reported a three-fold increase of bulimia nervosa, a two-fold increase of eating disorders not otherwise specified, and a two-fold increase of subclinical eating disorders in patients with type 1 diabetes compared with controls (2). No elevated rates of anorexia nervosa were found.”

“When DEB and type 1 diabetes co-occur, rates of morbidity and mortality are dramatically increased. A Danish study of comorbid type 1 diabetes and anorexia nervosa showed that the crude mortality rate at 10-year follow-up was 2.5% for type 1 diabetes and 6.5% for anorexia nervosa, but the rate increased to 34.8% when occurring together (the standardized mortality rates were 4.06, 8.86, and 14.5, respectively) (9). The presence of DEB in general also can severely impair metabolic control and advance the onset of long-term diabetes complications (4). Insulin reduction or omission is an efficient weight loss strategy uniquely available to patients with type 1 diabetes and has been reported in up to 37% of patients (1012). Insulin restriction is associated with poorer metabolic control, and previous research has found that self-reported insulin restriction at baseline leads to a three-fold increased risk of mortality at 11-year follow-up (10).

Few population-based studies have specifically investigated the prevalence of and relationship between DEBs and insulin restriction. The generalizability of existing research remains limited by relatively small samples and a lack of males. Further, many studies have relied on generic measures of DEBs, which may not be appropriate for use in individuals with type 1 diabetes. The Diabetes Eating Problem Survey–Revised (DEPS-R) is a newly developed and diabetes-specific screening tool for DEBs. A recent study demonstrated satisfactory psychometric properties of the Norwegian version of the DEPS-R among children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes 11–19 years of age (13). […] This study aimed to assess young patients with type 1 diabetes to assess the prevalence of DEBs and frequency of insulin omission or restriction, to compare the prevalence of DEB between males and females across different categories of weight and age, and to compare the clinical features of participants with and without DEBs and participants who restrict and do not restrict insulin. […] The final sample consisted of 770 […] children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes 11–19 years of age. There were 380 (49.4%) males and 390 (50.6%) females.”

27.7% of female and 9% of male children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes receiving intensified insulin treatment scored above the predetermined cutoff on the DEPS-R, suggesting a level of disturbed eating that warrants further attention by treatment providers. […] Significant differences emerged across age and weight categories, and notable sex-specific trends were observed. […] For the youngest (11–13 years) and underweight (BMI <18.5) categories, the proportion of DEB was <10% for both sexes […]. Among females, the prevalence of DEB increased dramatically with age to ∼33% among 14 to 16 year olds and to nearly 50% among 17 to 19 year olds. Among males, the rate remained low at 7% for 14 to 16 year olds and doubled to ∼15% for 17 to 19 year olds.

A similar sex-specific pattern was detected across weight categories. Among females, the prevalence of DEB increased steadily and significantly from 9% among the underweight category to 23% for normal weight, 42% for overweight, and 53% for the obese categories, respectively. Among males, ∼6–7% of both the underweight and normal weight groups reported DEB, with rates increasing to ∼15% for both the overweight and obese groups. […] When separated by sex, females scoring above the cutoff on the DEPS-R had significantly higher HbA1c (9.2% [SD, 1.9]) than females scoring below the cutoff (8.4% [SD, 1.3]; P < 0.001). The same trend was observed among males (9.2% [SD, 1.6] vs. 8.4% [SD, 1.3]; P < 0.01). […] A total of 31.6% of the participants reported using less insulin and 6.9% reported skipping their insulin dose entirely at least occasionally after overeating. When assessing the sexes separately, we found that 36.8% of females reported restricting and 26.2% reported skipping insulin because of overeating. The rates for males were 9.4 and 4.5%, respectively.”

“The finding that DEBs are common in young patients with type 1 diabetes is in line with previous literature (2). However, because of different assessment methods and different definitions of DEB, direct comparison with other studies is complicated, especially because this is the first study to have used the DEPS-R in a prevalence study. However, two studies using the original DEPS have reported similar results, with 37.9% (23) and 53.8% (24) of the participants reporting engaging in unhealthy weight control practices. In our study, females scored significantly higher than males, which is not surprising given previous studies demonstrating an increased risk of development of DEB in nondiabetic females compared with males. In addition, the prevalence rates increased considerably by increasing age and weight. A relationship between eating pathology and older age and higher BMI also has been demonstrated in previous research conducted in both diabetic and nondiabetic adolescent populations.”

“Consistent with existent literature (1012,27), we found a high frequency of insulin restriction. For example, Bryden et al. (11) assessed 113 males and females (aged 17–25 years) with type 1 diabetes and found that a total of 37% of the females (no males) reported a history of insulin omission or reduction for weight control purposes. Peveler et al. (12) investigated 87 females with type 1 diabetes aged 11–25 years, and 36% reported intentionally reducing or omitting their insulin doses to control their weight. Finally, Goebel-Fabbri et al. (10) examined 234 females 13–60 years of age and found that 30% reported insulin restriction. Similarly, 36.8% of the participants in our study reported reducing their insulin doses occasionally or more often after overeating.”

iv. Clinical Inertia in People With Type 2 Diabetes. A retrospective cohort study of more than 80,000 people.

“Despite good-quality evidence of tight glycemic control, particularly early in the disease trajectory (3), people with type 2 diabetes often do not reach recommended glycemic targets. Baseline characteristics in observational studies indicate that both insulin-experienced and insulin-naïve people may have mean HbA1c above the recommended target levels, reflecting the existence of patients with poor glycemic control in routine clinical care (810). […] U.K. data, based on an analysis reflecting previous NICE guidelines, show that it takes a mean of 7.7 years to initiate insulin after the start of the last OAD [oral antidiabetes drugs] (in people taking two or more OADs) and that mean HbA1c is ~10% (86 mmol/mol) at the time of insulin initiation (12). […] This failure to intensify treatment in a timely manner has been termed clinical inertia; however, data are lacking on clinical inertia in the diabetes-management pathway in a real-world primary care setting, and studies that have been carried out are, relatively speaking, small in scale (13,14). This retrospective cohort analysis investigates time to intensification of treatment in people with type 2 diabetes treated with OADs and the associated levels of glycemic control, and compares these findings with recommended treatment guidelines for diabetes.”

“We used the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) database. This is the world’s largest computerized database, representing the primary care longitudinal records of >13 million patients from across the U.K. The CPRD is representative of the U.K. general population, with age and sex distributions comparable with those reported by the U.K. National Population Census (15). All information collected in the CPRD has been subjected to validation studies and been proven to contain consistent and high-quality data (16).”

“50,476 people taking one OAD, 25,600 people taking two OADs, and 5,677 people taking three OADs were analyzed. Mean baseline HbA1c (the most recent measurement within 6 months before starting OADs) was 8.4% (68 mmol/mol), 8.8% (73 mmol/mol), and 9.0% (75 mmol/mol) in people taking one, two, or three OADs, respectively. […] In people with HbA1c ≥7.0% (≥53 mmol/mol) taking one OAD, median time to intensification with an additional OAD was 2.9 years, whereas median time to intensification with insulin was >7.2 years. Median time to insulin intensification in people with HbA1c ≥7.0% (≥53 mmol/mol) taking two or three OADs was >7.2 and >7.1 years, respectively. In people with HbA1c ≥7.5% or ≥8.0% (≥58 or ≥64 mmol/mol) taking one OAD, median time to intensification with an additional OAD was 1.9 or 1.6 years, respectively; median time to intensification with insulin was >7.1 or >6.9 years, respectively. In those people with HbA1c ≥7.5% or ≥8.0% (≥58 or ≥64 mmol/mol) and taking two OADs, median time to insulin was >7.2 and >6.9 years, respectively; and in those people taking three OADs, median time to insulin intensification was >6.1 and >6.0 years, respectively.”

“By end of follow-up, treatment of 17.5% of people with HbA1c ≥7.0% (≥53 mmol/mol) taking three OADs was intensified with insulin, treatment of 20.6% of people with HbA1c ≥7.5% (≥58 mmol/mol) taking three OADs was intensified with insulin, and treatment of 22.0% of people with HbA1c ≥8.0% (≥64 mmol/mol) taking three OADs was intensified with insulin. There were minimal differences in the proportion of patients intensified between the groups. […] In people taking one OAD, the probability of an additional OAD or initiation of insulin was 23.9% after 1 year, increasing to 48.7% by end of follow-up; in people taking two OADs, the probability of an additional OAD or initiation of insulin was 11.4% after 1 year, increasing to 30.1% after 2 years; and in people taking three OADs, the probability of an additional OAD or initiation of insulin was 5.7% after 1 year, increasing to 12.0% by the end of follow-up […] Mean ± SD HbA1c in patients taking one OAD was 8.7 ± 1.6% in those intensified with an additional OAD (n = 14,605), 9.4 ± 2.3% (n = 1,228) in those intensified with insulin, and 8.7 ± 1.7% (n = 15,833) in those intensified with additional OAD or insulin. Mean HbA1c in patients taking two OADs was 8.8 ± 1.5% (n = 3,744), 9.8 ± 1.9% (n = 1,631), and 9.1 ± 1.7% (n = 5,405), respectively. In patients taking three OADs, mean HbA1c at intensification with insulin was 9.7 ± 1.6% (n = 514).”

This analysis shows that there is a delay in intensifying treatment in people with type 2 diabetes with suboptimal glycemic control, with patients remaining in poor glycemic control for >7 years before intensification of treatment with insulin. In patients taking one, two, or three OADs, median time from initiation of treatment to intensification with an additional OAD for any patient exceeded the maximum follow-up time of 7.2–7.3 years, dependent on subcohort. […] Despite having HbA1c levels for which diabetes guidelines recommend treatment intensification, few people appeared to undergo intensification (4,6,7). The highest proportion of people with clinical inertia was for insulin initiation in people taking three OADs. Consequently, these people experienced prolonged periods in poor glycemic control, which is detrimental to long-term outcomes.”

“Previous studies in U.K. general practice have shown similar findings. A retrospective study involving 14,824 people with type 2 diabetes from 154 general practice centers contributing to the Doctors Independent Network Database (DIN-LINK) between 1995 and 2005 observed that median time to insulin initiation for people prescribed multiple OADs was 7.7 years (95% CI 7.4–8.5 years); mean HbA1c before insulin was 9.85% (84 mmol/mol), which decreased by 1.34% (95% CI 1.24–1.44%) after therapy (12). A longitudinal observational study from health maintenance organization data in 3,891 patients with type 2 diabetes in the U.S. observed that, despite continued HbA1c levels >7% (>53 mmol/mol), people treated with sulfonylurea and metformin did not start insulin for almost 3 years (21). Another retrospective cohort study, using data from the Health Improvement Network database of 2,501 people with type 2 diabetes, estimated that only 25% of people started insulin within 1.8 years of multiple OAD failure, if followed for 5 years, and that 50% of people delayed starting insulin for almost 5 years after failure of glycemic control with multiple OADs (22). The U.K. cohort of a recent, 26-week observational study examining insulin initiation in clinical practice reported a large proportion of insulin-naïve people with HbA1c >9% (>75 mmol/mol) at baseline (64%); the mean HbA1c in the global cohort was 8.9% (74 mmol/mol) (10). Consequently, our analysis supports previous findings concerning clinical inertia in both U.K. and U.S. general practice and reflects little improvement in recent years, despite updated treatment guidelines recommending tight glycemic control.

v. Small- and Large-Fiber Neuropathy After 40 Years of Type 1 Diabetes. Associations with glycemic control and advanced protein glycation: the Oslo Study.

“How hyperglycemia may cause damage to the nervous system is not fully understood. One consequence of hyperglycemia is the generation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that can form nonenzymatically between glucose, lipids, and amino groups. It is believed that AGEs are involved in the pathophysiology of neuropathy. AGEs tend to affect cellular function by altering protein function (11). One of the AGEs, N-ε-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), has been found in excessive amounts in the human diabetic peripheral nerve (12). High levels of methylglyoxal in serum have been found to be associated with painful peripheral neuropathy (13). In recent years, differentiation of affected nerves is possible by virtue of specific function tests to distinguish which fibers are damaged in diabetic polyneuropathy: large myelinated (Aα, Aβ), small thinly myelinated (Aδ), or small nonmyelinated (C) fibers. […] Our aims were to evaluate large- and small-nerve fiber function in long-term type 1 diabetes and to search for longitudinal associations with HbA1c and the AGEs CML and methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone.”

“27 persons with type 1 diabetes of 40 ± 3 years duration underwent large-nerve fiber examinations, with nerve conduction studies at baseline and years 8, 17, and 27. Small-fiber functions were assessed by quantitative sensory thresholds (QST) and intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD) at year 27. HbA1c was measured prospectively through 27 years. […] Fourteen patients (52%) reported sensory symptoms. Nine patients reported symptoms of a sensory neuropathy (reduced sensibility in feet or impaired balance), while three of these patients described pain. Five patients had symptoms compatible with carpal tunnel syndrome (pain or paresthesias within the innervation territory of the median nerve […]. An additional two had no symptoms but abnormal neurological tests with absent tendon reflexes and reduced sensibility. A total of 16 (59%) of the patients had symptoms or signs of neuropathy. […] No patient with symptoms of neuropathy had normal neurophysiological findings. […] Abnormal autonomic testing was observed in 7 (26%) of the patients and occurred together with neurophysiological signs of peripheral neuropathy. […] Twenty-two (81%) had small-fiber dysfunction by QST. Heat pain thresholds in the foot were associated with hydroimidazolone and HbA1c. IENFD was abnormal in 19 (70%) and significantly lower in diabetic patients than in age-matched control subjects (4.3 ± 2.3 vs. 11.2 ± 3.5 mm, P < 0.001). IENFD correlated negatively with HbA1c over 27 years (r = −0.4, P = 0.04) and CML (r = −0.5, P = 0.01). After adjustment for age, height, and BMI in a multiple linear regression model, CML was still independently associated with IENFD.”

Our study shows that small-fiber dysfunction is more prevalent than large-fiber dysfunction in diabetic neuropathy after long duration of type 1 diabetes. Although large-fiber abnormalities were less common than small-fiber abnormalities, almost 60% of the participants had their large nerves affected after 40 years with diabetes. Long-term blood glucose estimated by HbA1c measured prospectively through 27 years and AGEs predict large- and small-nerve fiber function.”

vi. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Type 1 Diabetes. A prospective cohort study of 4,083 patients with diabetes.

“Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a life-threatening cerebrovascular event, which is usually caused by a rupture of a cerebrovascular aneurysm. These aneurysms are mostly found in relatively large-caliber (≥1 mm) vessels and can often be considered as macrovascular lesions. The overall incidence of SAH has been reported to be 10.3 per 100,000 person-years (1), even though the variation in incidence between countries is substantial (1). Notably, the population-based incidence of SAH is 35 per 100,000 person-years in the adult (≥25 years of age) Finnish population (2). The incidence of nonaneurysmal SAH is globally unknown, but it is commonly believed that 5–15% of all SAHs are of nonaneurysmal origin. Prospective, long-term, population-based SAH risk factor studies suggest that smoking (24), high blood pressure (24), age (2,3), and female sex (2,4) are the most important risk factors for SAH, whereas diabetes (both types 1 and 2) does not appear to be associated with an increased risk of SAH (2,3).

An increased risk of cardiovascular disease is well recognized in people with diabetes. There are, however, very few studies on the risk of cerebrovascular disease in type 1 diabetes since most studies have focused on type 2 diabetes alone or together with type 1 diabetes. Cerebrovascular mortality in the 20–39-year age-group of people with type 1 diabetes is increased five- to sevenfold in comparison with the general population but accounts only for 15% of all cardiovascular deaths (5). Of the cerebrovascular deaths in patients with type 1 diabetes, 23% are due to hemorrhagic strokes (5). However, the incidence of SAH in type 1 diabetes is unknown. […] In this prospective cohort study of 4,083 patients with type 1 diabetes, we aimed to determine the incidence and characteristics of SAH.”

“52% [of participants] were men, the mean age was 37.4 ± 11.8 years, and the duration of diabetes was 21.6 ± 12.1 years at enrollment. The FinnDiane Study is a nationwide multicenter cohort study of genetic, clinical, and environmental risk factors for microvascular and macrovascular complications in type 1 diabetes. […] all type 1 diabetic patients in the FinnDiane database with follow-up data and without a history of stroke at baseline were included. […] Fifteen patients were confirmed to have an SAH, and thus the crude incidence of SAH was 40.9 (95% CI 22.9–67.4) per 100,000 person-years. Ten out of these 15 SAHs were nonaneurysmal SAHs […] The crude incidence of nonaneurysmal SAH was 27.3 (13.1–50.1) per 100,000 person-years. None of the 10 nonaneurysmal SAHs were fatal. […] Only 3 out of 10 patients did not have verified diabetic microvascular or macrovascular complications prior to the nonaneurysmal SAH event. […] Four patients with type 1 diabetes had a fatal SAH, and all these patients died within 24 h after SAH.”

The presented study results suggest that the incidence of nonaneurysmal SAH is high among patients with type 1 diabetes. […] It is of note that smoking type 1 diabetic patients had a significantly increased risk of nonaneurysmal and all-cause SAHs. Smoking also increases the risk of microvascular complications in insulin-treated diabetic patients, and these patients more often have retinal and renal microangiopathy than never-smokers (8). […] Given the high incidence of nonaneurysmal SAH in patients with type 1 diabetes and microvascular changes (i.e., diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy), the results support the hypothesis that nonaneurysmal SAH is a microvascular rather than macrovascular subtype of stroke.”

“Only one patient with type 1 diabetes had a confirmed aneurysmal SAH. Four other patients died suddenly due to an SAH. If these four patients with type 1 diabetes and a fatal SAH had an aneurysmal SAH, which, taking into account the autopsy reports and imaging findings, is very likely, aneurysmal SAH may be an exceptionally deadly event in type 1 diabetes. Population-based evidence suggests that up to 45% of people die during the first 30 days after SAH, and 18% die at emergency rooms or outside hospitals (9). […] Contrary to aneurysmal SAH, nonaneurysmal SAH is virtually always a nonfatal event (1014). This also supports the view that nonaneurysmal SAH is a disease of small intracranial vessels, i.e., a microvascular disease. Diabetic retinopathy, a chronic microvascular complication, has been associated with an increased risk of stroke in patients with diabetes (15,16). Embryonically, the retina is an outgrowth of the brain and is similar in its microvascular properties to the brain (17). Thus, it has been suggested that assessments of the retinal vasculature could be used to determine the risk of cerebrovascular diseases, such as stroke […] Most interestingly, the incidence of nonaneurysmal SAH was at least two times higher than the incidence of aneurysmal SAH in type 1 diabetic patients. In comparison, the incidence of nonaneurysmal SAH is >10 times lower than the incidence of aneurysmal SAH in the general adult population (21).”

vii. HbA1c and the Risks for All-Cause and Cardiovascular Mortality in the General Japanese Population.

Keep in mind when looking at these data that this is type 2 data. Type 1 diabetes is very rare in Japan and the rest of East Asia.

“The risk for cardiovascular death was evaluated in a large cohort of participants selected randomly from the overall Japanese population. A total of 7,120 participants (2,962 men and 4,158 women; mean age 52.3 years) free of previous CVD were followed for 15 years. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs among categories of HbA1c (<5.0%, 5.0–5.4%, 5.5–5.9%, 6.0–6.4%, and ≥6.5%) for participants without treatment for diabetes and HRs for participants with diabetes were calculated using a Cox proportional hazards model.

RESULTS During the study, there were 1,104 deaths, including 304 from CVD, 61 from coronary heart disease, and 127 from stroke (78 from cerebral infarction, 25 from cerebral hemorrhage, and 24 from unclassified stroke). Relations to HbA1c with all-cause mortality and CVD death were graded and continuous, and multivariate-adjusted HRs for CVD death in participants with HbA1c 6.0–6.4% and ≥6.5% were 2.18 (95% CI 1.22–3.87) and 2.75 (1.43–5.28), respectively, compared with participants with HbA1c <5.0%. Similar associations were observed between HbA1c and death from coronary heart disease and death from cerebral infarction.

CONCLUSIONS High HbA1c levels were associated with increased risk for all-cause mortality and death from CVD, coronary heart disease, and cerebral infarction in general East Asian populations, as in Western populations.”

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November 15, 2017 Posted by | Cardiology, Diabetes, Epidemiology, Medicine, Neurology, Pharmacology, Studies | Leave a comment

Organic Chemistry (II)

I have included some observations from the second half of the book below, as well as some links to topics covered.

“[E]nzymes are used routinely to catalyse reactions in the research laboratory, and for a variety of industrial processes involving pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and biofuels. In the past, enzymes had to be extracted from natural sources — a process that was both expensive and slow. But nowadays, genetic engineering can incorporate the gene for a key enzyme into the DNA of fast growing microbial cells, allowing the enzyme to be obtained more quickly and in far greater yield. Genetic engineering has also made it possible to modify the amino acids making up an enzyme. Such modified enzymes can prove more effective as catalysts, accept a wider range of substrates, and survive harsher reaction conditions. […] New enzymes are constantly being discovered in the natural world as well as in the laboratory. Fungi and bacteria are particularly rich in enzymes that allow them to degrade organic compounds. It is estimated that a typical bacterial cell contains about 3,000 enzymes, whereas a fungal cell contains 6,000. Considering the variety of bacterial and fungal species in existence, this represents a huge reservoir of new enzymes, and it is estimated that only 3 per cent of them have been investigated so far.”

“One of the most important applications of organic chemistry involves the design and synthesis of pharmaceutical agents — a topic that is defined as medicinal chemistry. […] In the 19th century, chemists isolated chemical components from known herbs and extracts. Their aim was to identify a single chemical that was responsible for the extract’s pharmacological effects — the active principle. […] It was not long before chemists synthesized analogues of active principles. Analogues are structures which have been modified slightly from the original active principle. Such modifications can often improve activity or reduce side effects. This led to the concept of the lead compound — a compound with a useful pharmacological activity that could act as the starting point for further research. […] The first half of the 20th century culminated in the discovery of effective antimicrobial agents. […] The 1960s can be viewed as the birth of rational drug design. During that period there were important advances in the design of effective anti-ulcer agents, anti-asthmatics, and beta-blockers for the treatment of high blood pressure. Much of this was based on trying to understand how drugs work at the molecular level and proposing theories about why some compounds were active and some were not.”

“[R]ational drug design was boosted enormously towards the end of the century by advances in both biology and chemistry. The sequencing of the human genome led to the identification of previously unknown proteins that could serve as potential drug targets. […] Advances in automated, small-scale testing procedures (high-throughput screening) also allowed the rapid testing of potential drugs. In chemistry, advances were made in X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy, allowing scientists to study the structure of drugs and their mechanisms of action. Powerful molecular modelling software packages were developed that allowed researchers to study how a drug binds to a protein binding site. […] the development of automated synthetic methods has vastly increased the number of compounds that can be synthesized in a given time period. Companies can now produce thousands of compounds that can be stored and tested for pharmacological activity. Such stores have been called chemical libraries and are routinely tested to identify compounds capable of binding with a specific protein target. These advances have boosted medicinal chemistry research over the last twenty years in virtually every area of medicine.”

“Drugs interact with molecular targets in the body such as proteins and nucleic acids. However, the vast majority of clinically useful drugs interact with proteins, especially receptors, enzymes, and transport proteins […] Enzymes are […] important drug targets. Drugs that bind to the active site and prevent the enzyme acting as a catalyst are known as enzyme inhibitors. […] Enzymes are located inside cells, and so enzyme inhibitors have to cross cell membranes in order to reach them—an important consideration in drug design. […] Transport proteins are targets for a number of therapeutically important drugs. For example, a group of antidepressants known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors prevent serotonin being transported into neurons by transport proteins.”

“The main pharmacokinetic factors are absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion. Absorption relates to how much of an orally administered drug survives the digestive enzymes and crosses the gut wall to reach the bloodstream. Once there, the drug is carried to the liver where a certain percentage of it is metabolized by metabolic enzymes. This is known as the first-pass effect. The ‘survivors’ are then distributed round the body by the blood supply, but this is an uneven process. The tissues and organs with the richest supply of blood vessels receive the greatest proportion of the drug. Some drugs may get ‘trapped’ or sidetracked. For example fatty drugs tend to get absorbed in fat tissue and fail to reach their target. The kidneys are chiefly responsible for the excretion of drugs and their metabolites.”

“Having identified a lead compound, it is important to establish which features of the compound are important for activity. This, in turn, can give a better understanding of how the compound binds to its molecular target. Most drugs are significantly smaller than molecular targets such as proteins. This means that the drug binds to quite a small region of the protein — a region known as the binding site […]. Within this binding site, there are binding regions that can form different types of intermolecular interactions such as van der Waals interactions, hydrogen bonds, and ionic interactions. If a drug has functional groups and substituents capable of interacting with those binding regions, then binding can take place. A lead compound may have several groups that are capable of forming intermolecular interactions, but not all of them are necessarily needed. One way of identifying the important binding groups is to crystallize the target protein with the drug bound to the binding site. X-ray crystallography then produces a picture of the complex which allows identification of binding interactions. However, it is not always possible to crystallize target proteins and so a different approach is needed. This involves synthesizing analogues of the lead compound where groups are modified or removed. Comparing the activity of each analogue with the lead compound can then determine whether a particular group is important or not. This is known as an SAR study, where SAR stands for structure–activity relationships.” Once the important binding groups have been identified, the pharmacophore for the lead compound can be defined. This specifies the important binding groups and their relative position in the molecule.”

“One way of identifying the active conformation of a flexible lead compound is to synthesize rigid analogues where the binding groups are locked into defined positions. This is known as rigidification or conformational restriction. The pharmacophore will then be represented by the most active analogue. […] A large number of rotatable bonds is likely to have an adverse effect on drug activity. This is because a flexible molecule can adopt a large number of conformations, and only one of these shapes corresponds to the active conformation. […] In contrast, a totally rigid molecule containing the required pharmacophore will bind the first time it enters the binding site, resulting in greater activity. […] It is also important to optimize a drug’s pharmacokinetic properties such that it can reach its target in the body. Strategies include altering the drug’s hydrophilic/hydrophobic properties to improve absorption, and the addition of substituents that block metabolism at specific parts of the molecule. […] The drug candidate must [in general] have useful activity and selectivity, with minimal side effects. It must have good pharmacokinetic properties, lack toxicity, and preferably have no interactions with other drugs that might be taken by a patient. Finally, it is important that it can be synthesized as cheaply as possible”.

“Most drugs that have reached clinical trials for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease have failed. Between 2002 and 2012, 244 novel compounds were tested in 414 clinical trials, but only one drug gained approval. This represents a failure rate of 99.6 per cent as against a failure rate of 81 per cent for anti-cancer drugs.”

“It takes about ten years and £160 million to develop a new pesticide […] The volume of global sales increased 47 per cent in the ten-year period between 2002 and 2012, while, in 2012, total sales amounted to £31 billion. […] In many respects, agrochemical research is similar to pharmaceutical research. The aim is to find pesticides that are toxic to ‘pests’, but relatively harmless to humans and beneficial life forms. The strategies used to achieve this goal are also similar. Selectivity can be achieved by designing agents that interact with molecular targets that are present in pests, but not other species. Another approach is to take advantage of any metabolic reactions that are unique to pests. An inactive prodrug could then be designed that is metabolized to a toxic compound in the pest, but remains harmless in other species. Finally, it might be possible to take advantage of pharmacokinetic differences between pests and other species, such that a pesticide reaches its target more easily in the pest. […] Insecticides are being developed that act on a range of different targets as a means of tackling resistance. If resistance should arise to an insecticide acting on one particular target, then one can switch to using an insecticide that acts on a different target. […] Several insecticides act as insect growth regulators (IGRs) and target the moulting process rather than the nervous system. In general, IGRs take longer to kill insects but are thought to cause less detrimental effects to beneficial insects. […] Herbicides control weeds that would otherwise compete with crops for water and soil nutrients. More is spent on herbicides than any other class of pesticide […] The synthetic agent 2,4-D […] was synthesized by ICI in 1940 as part of research carried out on biological weapons […] It was first used commercially in 1946 and proved highly successful in eradicating weeds in cereal grass crops such as wheat, maize, and rice. […] The compound […] is still the most widely used herbicide in the world.”

“The type of conjugated system present in a molecule determines the specific wavelength of light absorbed. In general, the more extended the conjugation, the higher the wavelength absorbed. For example, β-carotene […] is the molecule responsible for the orange colour of carrots. It has a conjugated system involving eleven double bonds, and absorbs light in the blue region of the spectrum. It appears red because the reflected light lacks the blue component. Zeaxanthin is very similar in structure to β-carotene, and is responsible for the yellow colour of corn. […] Lycopene absorbs blue-green light and is responsible for the red colour of tomatoes, rose hips, and berries. Chlorophyll absorbs red light and is coloured green. […] Scented molecules interact with olfactory receptors in the nose. […] there are around 400 different olfactory protein receptors in humans […] The natural aroma of a rose is due mainly to 2-phenylethanol, geraniol, and citronellol.”

“Over the last fifty years, synthetic materials have largely replaced natural materials such as wood, leather, wool, and cotton. Plastics and polymers are perhaps the most visible sign of how organic chemistry has changed society. […] It is estimated that production of global plastics was 288 million tons in 2012 […] Polymerization involves linking molecular strands called polymers […]. By varying the nature of the monomer, a huge range of different polymers can be synthesized with widely differing properties. The idea of linking small molecular building blocks into polymers is not a new one. Nature has been at it for millions of years using amino acid building blocks to make proteins, and nucleotide building blocks to make nucleic acids […] The raw materials for plastics come mainly from oil, which is a finite resource. Therefore, it makes sense to recycle or depolymerize plastics to recover that resource. Virtually all plastics can be recycled, but it is not necessarily economically feasible to do so. Traditional recycling of polyesters, polycarbonates, and polystyrene tends to produce inferior plastics that are suitable only for low-quality goods.”

Adipic acid.
Protease. Lipase. Amylase. Cellulase.
Reflectin.
Agonist.
Antagonist.
Prodrug.
Conformational change.
Process chemistry (chemical development).
Clinical trial.
Phenylbutazone.
Pesticide.
Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane.
Aldrin.
N-Methyl carbamate.
Organophosphates.
Pyrethrum.
Neonicotinoid.
Colony collapse disorder.
Ecdysone receptor.
Methoprene.
Tebufenozide.
Fungicide.
Quinone outside inhibitors (QoI).
Allelopathy.
Glyphosate.
11-cis retinal.
Chromophore.
Synthetic dyes.
Methylene blue.
Cryptochrome.
Pheromone.
Artificial sweeteners.
Miraculin.
Addition polymer.
Condensation polymer.
Polyethylene.
Polypropylene.
Polyvinyl chloride.
Bisphenol A.
Vulcanization.
Kevlar.
Polycarbonate.
Polyhydroxyalkanoates.
Bioplastic.
Nanochemistry.
Allotropy.
Allotropes of carbon.
Carbon nanotube.
Rotaxane.
π-interactions.
Molecular switch.

November 11, 2017 Posted by | Biology, Books, Botany, Chemistry, Medicine, Pharmacology, Zoology | Leave a comment

Molecules

This book is almost exclusively devoted to covering biochemistry topics. When the coverage is decent I find biochemistry reasonably interesting – for example I really liked Beer, Björk & Beardall’s photosynthesis book – and the coverage here was okay, but not more than that. I think that Ball was trying to cover a bit too much ground, or perhaps that there was really too much ground to cover for it to even make sense to try to write a book on this particular topic in a series like this. I learned a lot though.

As usual I’ve added some quotes from the coverage below, as well as some additional links to topics/concepts/people/etc. covered in the book.

“Most atoms on their own are highly reactive – they have a predisposition to join up with other atoms. Molecules are collectives of atoms, firmly welded together into assemblies that may contain anything up to many millions of them. […] By molecules, we generally mean assemblies of a discrete, countable number of atoms. […] Some pure elements adopt molecular forms; others do not. As a rough rule of thumb, metals are non-molecular […] whereas non-metals are molecular. […] molecules are the smallest units of meaning in chemistry. It is through molecules, not atoms, that one can tell stories in the sub-microscopic world. They are the words; atoms are just the letters. […] most words are distinct aggregates of several letters arranged in a particular order. We often find that longer words convey subtler and more finely nuanced meanings. And in molecules, as in words, the order in which the component parts are put together matters: ‘save’ and ‘vase’ do not mean the same thing.”

“There are something like 60,000 different varieties of protein molecule in human cells, each conducting a highly specialized task. It would generally be impossible to guess what this task is merely by looking at a protein. They are undistinguished in appearance, mostly globular in shape […] and composed primarily of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, and a little sulphur. […] There are twenty varieties of amino acids in natural proteins. In the chain, one amino acid is linked to the next via a covalent bond called a peptide bond. Both molecules shed a few extraneous atoms to make this linkage, and the remainder – another link in the chain – is called a residue. The chain itself is termed a polypeptide. Any string of amino acid residues is a polypeptide. […] In a protein the order of amino acids along the chain – the sequence – is not arbitrary. It is selected […] to ensure that the chain will collapse and curl up in water into the precisely determined globular form of the protein, with all parts of the chain in the right place. This shape can be destroyed by warming the protein, a process called denaturation. But many proteins will fold up again spontaneously into the same globular structure when cooled. In other words, the chain has a kind of memory of its folded shape. The details of this folding process are still not fully understood – it is, in fact, one of the central unsolved puzzles of molecular biology. […] proteins are made not in the [cell] nucleus but in a different compartment called the endoplasmic reticulum […]. The gene is transcribed first into a molecule related to DNA, called RNA (ribonucleic acid). The RNA molecules travel from the nucleus to the endoplasmic reticulum, where they are translated to proteins. The proteins are then shipped off to where they are needed.”

[M]icrofibrils aggregate together in various ways. For example, they can gather in a staggered arrangement to form thick strands called banded fibrils. […] Banded fibrils constitute the connective tissues between cells – they are the cables that hold our flesh together. Bone consists of collagen banded fibrils sprinkled with tiny crystals of the mineral hydroxyapatite, which is basically calcium phosphate. Because of the high protein content of bone, it is flexible and resilient as well as hard. […] In contrast to the disorderly tangle of connective tissue, the eye’s cornea contains collagen fibrils packed side by side in an orderly manner. These fibrils are too small to scatter light, and so the material is virtually transparent. The basic design principle – one that recurs often in nature – is that, by tinkering with the chemical composition and, most importantly, the hierarchical arrangement of the same basic molecules, it is possible to extract several different kinds of material properties. […] cross-links determine the strength of the material: hair and fingernail are more highly cross-linked than skin. Curly or frizzy hair can be straightened by breaking some of [the] sulphur cross-links to make the hairs more pliable. […] Many of the body’s structural fabrics are proteins. Unlike enzymes, structural proteins do not have to conduct any delicate chemistry, but must simply be (for instance) tough, or flexible, or waterproof. In principle many other materials besides proteins would suffice; and indeed, plants use cellulose (a sugar-based polymer) to make their tissues.”

“In many ways, it is metabolism and not replication that provides the best working definition of life. Evolutionary biologists would say that we exist in order to reproduce – but we are not, even the most amorous of us, trying to reproduce all the time. Yet, if we stop metabolizing, even for a minute or two, we are done for. […] Whether waking or asleep, our bodies stay close to a healthy temperature of 37 °C. There is only one way of doing this: our cells are constantly pumping out heat, a by-product of metabolism. Heat is not really the point here – it is simply unavoidable, because all conversion of energy from one form to another squanders some of it this way. Our metabolic processes are primarily about making molecules. Cells cannot survive without constantly reinventing themselves: making new amino acids for proteins, new lipids for membranes, new nucleic acids so that they can divide.”

“In the body, combustion takes place in a tightly controlled, graded sequence of steps, and some chemical energy is drawn off and stored at each stage. […] A power station burns coal, oil, or gas […]. Burning is just a means to an end. The heat is used to turn water into steam; the pressure of the steam drives turbines; the turbines spin and send wire coils whirling in the arms of great magnets, which induces an electrical current in the wire. Energy is passed on, from chemical to heat to mechanical to electrical. And every plant has a barrage of regulatory and safety mechanisms. There are manual checks on pressure gauges and on the structural integrity of moving parts. Automatic sensors make the measurements. Failsafe devices avert catastrophic failure. Energy generation in the cell is every bit as complicated. […] The cell seems to have thought of everything, and has protein devices for fine-tuning it all.”

ATP is the key to the maintenance of cellular integrity and organization, and so the cell puts a great deal of effort into making as much of it as possible from each molecule of glucose that it burns. About 40 per cent of the energy released by the combustion of food is conserved in ATP molecules. ATP is rich in energy because it is like a coiled spring. It contains three phosphate groups, linked like so many train carriages. Each of these phosphate groups has a negative charge; this means that they repel one another. But because they are joined by chemical bonds, they cannot escape one another […]. Straining to get away, the phosphates pull an energetically powerful punch. […] The links between phosphates can be snipped in a reaction that involves water […] called hydrolysis (‘splitting with water’). Each time a bond is hydrolysed, energy is released. Setting free the outermost phosphate converts ATP to adenosine diphosphate (ADP); cleave the second phosphate and it becomes adenosine monophosphate (AMP). Both severances release comparable amounts of energy.”

“Burning sugar is a two-stage process, beginning with its transformation to a molecule called pyruvate in a process known as glycolysis […]. This involves a sequence of ten enzyme-catalysed steps. The first five of these split glucose in half […], powered by the consumption of ATP molecules: two of them are ‘decharged’ to ADP for every glucose molecule split. But the conversion of the fragments to pyruvate […] permits ATP to be recouped from ADP. Four ATP molecules are made this way, so that there is an overall gain of two ATP molecules per glucose molecule consumed. Thus glycolysis charges the cell’s batteries. Pyruvate then normally enters the second stage of the combustion process: the citric acid cycle, which requires oxygen. But if oxygen is scarce – that is, under anaerobic conditions – a contingency plan is enacted whereby pyruvate is instead converted to the molecule lactate. […] The first thing a mitochondrion does is convert pyruvate enzymatically to a molecule called acetyl coenzyme A (CoA). The breakdown of fatty acids and glycerides from fats also eventually generates acetyl CoA. The [citric acid] cycle is a sequence of eight enzyme-catalysed reactions that transform acetyl CoA first to citric acid and then to various other molecules, ending with […] oxaloacetate. This end is a new beginning, for oxaloacetate reacts with acetyl CoA to make citric acid. In some of the steps of the cycle, carbon dioxide is generated as a by-product. It dissolves in the bloodstream and is carried off to the lungs to be exhaled. Thus in effect the carbon in the original glucose molecules is syphoned off into the end product carbon dioxide, completing the combustion process. […] Also syphoned off from the cycle are electrons – crudely speaking, the citric acid cycle sends an electrical current to a different part of the mitochondrion. These electrons are used to convert oxygen molecules and positively charged hydrogen ions to water – an energy-releasing process. The energy is captured and used to make ATP in abundance.”

“While mammalian cells have fuel-burning factories in the form of mitochondria, the solar-power centres in the cells of plant leaves are compartments called chloroplasts […] chloroplast takes carbon dioxide and water, and from them constructs […] sugar. […] In the first part of photosynthesis, light is used to convert NADP to an electron carrier (NADPH) and to transform ADP to ATP. This is effectively a charging-up process that primes the chloroplast for glucose synthesis. In the second part, ATP and NADPH are used to turn carbon dioxide into sugar, in a cyclic sequence of steps called the Calvin–Benson cycle […] There are several similarities between the processes of aerobic metabolism and photosynthesis. Both consist of two distinct sub-processes with separate evolutionary origins: a linear sequence of reactions coupled to a cyclic sequence that regenerates the molecules they both need. The bridge between glycolysis and the citric acid cycle is the electron-ferrying NAD molecule; the two sub-processes of photosynthesis are bridged by the cycling of an almost identical molecule, NAD phosphate (NADP).”

“Despite the variety of messages that hormones convey, the mechanism by which the signal is passed from a receptor protein at the cell surface to the cell’s interior is the same in almost all cases. It involves a sequence of molecular interactions in which molecules transform one another down a relay chain. In cell biology this is called signal transduction. At the same time as relaying the message, these interactions amplify the signal so that the docking of a single hormone molecule to a receptor creates a big response inside the cell. […] The receptor proteins span the entire width of the membrane; the hormone-binding site protrudes on the outer surface, while the base of the receptor emerges from the inner surface […]. When the receptor binds its target hormone, a shape change is transmitted to the lower face of the protein, which enables it to act as an enzyme. […] The participants of all these processes [G protein, guanosine diphosphate and -triphosphate, adenylate cyclase… – figured it didn’t matter if I left out a few details – US…] are stuck to the cell wall. But cAMP floats freely in the cell’s cytoplasm, and is able to carry the signal into the cell interior. It is called a ‘second messenger’, since it is the agent that relays the signal of the ‘first messenger’ (the hormone) into the community of the cell. Cyclic AMP becomes attached to protein molecules called protein kinases, whereupon they in turn become activated as enzymes. Most protein kinases switch other enzymes on and off by attaching phosphate groups to them – a reaction called phosphorylation. […] The process might sound rather complicated, but it is really nothing more than a molecular relay. The signal is passed from the hormone to its receptor, then to the G protein, on to an enzyme and thence to the second messenger, and further on to a protein kinase, and so forth. The G-protein mechanism of signal transduction was discovered in the 1970s by Alfred Gilman and Martin Rodbell, for which they received the 1994 Nobel Prize for medicine. It represents one of the most widespread means of getting a message across a cell membrane. […] it is not just hormonal signalling that makes use of the G-protein mechanism. Our senses of vision and smell, which also involve the transmission of signals, employ the same switching process.”

“Although axon signals are electrical, they differ from those in the metal wires of electronic circuitry. The axon is basically a tubular cell membrane decorated along its length with channels that let sodium and potassium ions in and out. Some of these ion channels are permanently open; others are ‘gated’, opening or closing in response to electrical signals. And some are not really channels at all but pumps, which actively transport sodium ions out of the cell and potassium ions in. These sodium-potassium pumps can move ions […] powered by ATP. […] Drugs that relieve pain typically engage with inhibitory receptors. Morphine, the main active ingredient of opium, binds to so-called opioid receptors in the spinal cord, which inhibit the transmission of pain signals to the brain. There are also opioid receptors in the brain itself, which is why morphine and related opiate drugs have a mental as well as a somatic effect. These receptors in the brain are the binding sites of peptide molecules called endorphins, which the brain produces in response to pain. Some of these are themselves extremely powerful painkillers. […] Not all pain-relieving drugs (analgesics) work by blocking the pain signal. Some prevent the signal from ever being sent. Pain signals are initiated by peptides called prostaglandins, which are manufactured and released by distressed cells. Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) latches onto and inhibits one of the enzymes responsible for prostaglandin synthesis, cutting off the cry of pain at its source. Unfortunately, prostaglandins are also responsible for making the mucus that protects the stomach lining […], so one of the side effects of aspirin is the risk of ulcer formation.”

“Shape changes […] are common when a receptor binds its target. If binding alone is the objective, a big shape change is not terribly desirable, since the internal rearrangements of the receptor make heavy weather of the binding event and may make it harder to achieve. This is why many supramolecular hosts are designed so that they are ‘pre-organized’ to receive their guests, minimizing the shape change caused by binding.”

“The way that a protein chain folds up is determined by its amino-acid sequence […] so the ‘information’ for making a protein is uniquely specified by this sequence. DNA encodes this information using […] groups of three bases [to] represent each amino acid. This is the genetic code.* How a particular protein sequence determines the way its chain folds is not yet fully understood. […] Nevertheless, the principle of information flow in the cell is clear. DNA is a manual of information about proteins. We can think of each chromosome as a separate chapter, each gene as a word in that chapter (they are very long words!), and each sequential group of three bases in the gene as a character in the word. Proteins are translations of the words into another language, whose characters are amino acids. In general, only when the genetic language is translated can we understand what it means.”

“It is thought that only about 2–3 per cent of the entire human genome codes for proteins. […] Some people object to genetic engineering on the grounds that it is ethically wrong to tamper with the fundamental material of life – DNA – whether it is in bacteria, humans, tomatoes, or sheep. One can understand such objections, and it would be arrogant to dismiss them as unscientific. Nevertheless, they do sit uneasily with what we now know about the molecular basis of life. The idea that our genetic make-up is sacrosanct looks hard to sustain once we appreciate how contingent, not to say arbitrary, that make-up is. Our genomes are mostly parasite-riddled junk, full of the detritus of over three billion years of evolution.”

Links:

Roald Hoffmann.
Molecular solid.
Covalent bond.
Visible spectrum.
X-ray crystallography.
Electron microscope.
Valence (chemistry).
John Dalton.
Isomer.
Lysozyme.
Organic chemistry.
Synthetic dye industry/Alizarin.
Paul Ehrlich (staining).
Retrosynthetic analysis. [I would have added a link to ‘rational synthesis as well here if there’d been a good article on that topic, but I wasn’t able to find one. Anyway: “Organic chemists call [the] kind of procedure […] in which a starting molecule is converted systematically, bit by bit, to the desired product […] a rational synthesis.”]
Paclitaxel synthesis.
Protein.
Enzyme.
Tryptophan synthase.
Ubiquitin.
Amino acid.
Protein folding.
Peptide bond.
Hydrogen bond.
Nucleotide.
Chromosome.
Structural gene. Regulatory gene.
Operon.
Gregor Mendel.
Mitochondrial DNA.
RNA world.
Ribozyme.
Artificial gene synthesis.
Keratin.
Silk.
Vulcanization.
Aramid.
Microtubule.
Tubulin.
Carbon nanotube.
Amylase/pepsin/glycogen/insulin.
Cytochrome c oxidase.
ATP synthase.
Haemoglobin.
Thylakoid membrane.
Chlorophyll.
Liposome.
TNT.
Motor protein. Dynein. Kinesin.
Sarcomere.
Sliding filament theory of muscle action.
Photoisomerization.
Supramolecular chemistry.
Hormone. Endocrine system.
Neurotransmitter.
Ionophore.
DNA.
Mutation.
Intron. Exon.
Transposon.
Molecular electronics.

October 30, 2017 Posted by | Biology, Books, Botany, Chemistry, Genetics, Neurology, Pharmacology | Leave a comment

A few diabetes papers of interest

i. The Pharmacogenetics of Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review.

“We performed a systematic review to identify which genetic variants predict response to diabetes medications.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We performed a search of electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Database) and a manual search to identify original, longitudinal studies of the effect of diabetes medications on incident diabetes, HbA1c, fasting glucose, and postprandial glucose in prediabetes or type 2 diabetes by genetic variation.

RESULTS Of 7,279 citations, we included 34 articles (N = 10,407) evaluating metformin (n = 14), sulfonylureas (n = 4), repaglinide (n = 8), pioglitazone (n = 3), rosiglitazone (n = 4), and acarbose (n = 4). […] Significant medication–gene interactions for glycemic outcomes included 1) metformin and the SLC22A1, SLC22A2, SLC47A1, PRKAB2, PRKAA2, PRKAA1, and STK11 loci; 2) sulfonylureas and the CYP2C9 and TCF7L2 loci; 3) repaglinide and the KCNJ11, SLC30A8, NEUROD1/BETA2, UCP2, and PAX4 loci; 4) pioglitazone and the PPARG2 and PTPRD loci; 5) rosiglitazone and the KCNQ1 and RBP4 loci; and 5) acarbose and the PPARA, HNF4A, LIPC, and PPARGC1A loci. Data were insufficient for meta-analysis.

CONCLUSIONS We found evidence of pharmacogenetic interactions for metformin, sulfonylureas, repaglinide, thiazolidinediones, and acarbose consistent with their pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics.”

“In this systematic review, we identified 34 articles on the pharmacogenetics of diabetes medications, with several reporting statistically significant interactions between genetic variants and medications for glycemic outcomes. Most pharmacogenetic interactions were only evaluated in a single study, did not use a control group, and/or did not report enough information to judge internal validity. However, our results do suggest specific, biologically plausible, gene–medication interactions, and we recommend confirmation of the biologically plausible interactions as a priority, including those for drug transporters, metabolizers, and targets of action. […] Given the number of comparisons reported in the included studies and the lack of accounting for multiple comparisons in approximately 53% of studies, many of the reported findings may [however] be false positives.”

ii. Insights Offered by Economic Analyses.

“This issue of Diabetes Care includes three economic analyses. The first describes the incremental costs of diabetes over a lifetime and highlights how interventions to prevent diabetes may reduce lifetime costs (1). The second demonstrates that although an expensive, intensive lifestyle intervention for type 2 diabetes does not reduce adverse cardiovascular outcomes over 10 years, it significantly reduces the costs of non-intervention−related medical care (2). The third demonstrates that although the use of the International Association of the Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) criteria for the screening and diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) results in a threefold increase in the number of people labeled as having GDM, it reduces the risk of maternal and neonatal adverse health outcomes and reduces costs (3). The first report highlights the enormous potential value of intervening in adults at high risk for type 2 diabetes to prevent its development. The second illustrates the importance of measuring economic outcomes in addition to standard clinical outcomes to fully assess the value of new treatments. The third demonstrates the importance of rigorously weighing the costs of screening and treatment against the costs of health outcomes when evaluating new approaches to care.”

“The costs of diabetes monitoring and treatment accrue as of function of the duration of diabetes, so adults who are younger at diagnosis are more likely to survive to develop the late, expensive complications of diabetes, thus they incur higher lifetime costs attributable to diabetes. Zhuo et al. report that people with diabetes diagnosed at age 40 spend approximately $125,000 more for medical care over their lifetimes than people without diabetes. For people diagnosed with diabetes at age 50, the discounted lifetime excess medical spending is approximately $91,000; for those diagnosed at age 60, it is approximately $54,000; and for those diagnosed at age 65, it is approximately $36,000 (1).

These results are very consistent with results reported by the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) Research Group, which assessed the cost-effectiveness of diabetes prevention. […] In the simulated lifetime economic analysis [included in that study] the lifestyle intervention was more cost-effective in younger participants than in older participants (5). By delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes, the lifestyle intervention delayed or prevented the need for diabetes monitoring and treatment, surveillance of diabetic microvascular and neuropathic complications, and treatment of the late, expensive complications and comorbidities of diabetes, including end-stage renal disease and cardiovascular disease (5). Although this finding was controversial at the end of the randomized, controlled clinical trial, all but 1 of 12 economic analyses published by 10 research groups in nine countries have demonstrated that lifestyle intervention for the prevention of type 2 diabetes is very cost-effective, if not cost-saving, compared with a placebo intervention (6).

Empiric, within-trial economic analyses of the DPP have now demonstrated that the incremental costs of the lifestyle intervention are almost entirely offset by reductions in the costs of medical care outside the study, especially the cost of self-monitoring supplies, prescription medications, and outpatient and inpatient care (7). Over 10 years, the DPP intensive lifestyle intervention cost only ∼$13,000 per quality-adjusted life-year gained when the analysis used an intent-to-treat approach (7) and was even more cost-effective when the analysis assessed outcomes and costs among adherent participants (8).”

“The American Diabetes Association has reported that although institutional care (hospital, nursing home, and hospice care) still account for 52% of annual per capita health care expenditures for people with diabetes, outpatient medications and supplies now account for 30% of expenditures (9). Between 2007 and 2012, annual per capita expenditures for inpatient care increased by 2%, while expenditures for medications and supplies increased by 51% (9). As the costs of diabetes medications and supplies continue to increase, it will be even more important to consider cost savings arising from the less frequent use of medications when evaluating the benefits of nonpharmacologic interventions.”

iii. The Lifetime Cost of Diabetes and Its Implications for Diabetes Prevention. (This is the Zhuo et al. paper mentioned above.)

“We aggregated annual medical expenditures from the age of diabetes diagnosis to death to determine lifetime medical expenditure. Annual medical expenditures were estimated by sex, age at diagnosis, and diabetes duration using data from 2006–2009 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys, which were linked to data from 2005–2008 National Health Interview Surveys. We combined survival data from published studies with the estimated annual expenditures to calculate lifetime spending. We then compared lifetime spending for people with diabetes with that for those without diabetes. Future spending was discounted at 3% annually. […] The discounted excess lifetime medical spending for people with diabetes was $124,600 ($211,400 if not discounted), $91,200 ($135,600), $53,800 ($70,200), and $35,900 ($43,900) when diagnosed with diabetes at ages 40, 50, 60, and 65 years, respectively. Younger age at diagnosis and female sex were associated with higher levels of lifetime excess medical spending attributed to diabetes.

CONCLUSIONS Having diabetes is associated with substantially higher lifetime medical expenditures despite being associated with reduced life expectancy. If prevention costs can be kept sufficiently low, diabetes prevention may lead to a reduction in long-term medical costs.”

The selection criteria employed in this paper are not perfect; they excluded all individuals below the age of 30 “because they likely had type 1 diabetes”, which although true is only ‘mostly true’. Some of those individuals had(/have) type 2, but if you’re evaluating prevention schemes it probably makes sense to error on the side of caution (better to miss some type 2 patients than to include some type 1s), assuming the timing of the intervention is not too important. This gets more complicated if prevention schemes are more likely to have large and persistent effects in young people – however I don’t think that’s the case, as a counterpoint drug adherence studies often seem to find that young people aren’t particularly motivated to adhere to their treatment schedules compared to their older counterparts (who might have more advanced disease and so are more likely to achieve symptomatic relief by adhering to treatments).

A few more observations from the paper:

“The prevalence of participants with diabetes in the study population was 7.4%, of whom 54% were diagnosed between the ages of 45 and 64 years. The mean age at diagnosis was 55 years, and the mean length of time since diagnosis was 9.4 years (39% of participants with diabetes had been diagnosed for ≤5 years, 32% for 6–15 years, and 27% for ≥16 years). […] The observed annual medical spending for people with diabetes was $13,966—more than twice that for people without diabetes.”

“Regardless of diabetes status, the survival-adjusted annual medical spending decreased after age 60 years, primarily because of a decreasing probability of survival. Because the probability of survival decreased more rapidly in people with diabetes than in those without, corresponding spending declined as people died and no longer accrued medical costs. For example, among men diagnosed with diabetes at age 40 years, 34% were expected to survive to age 80 years; among men of the same age who never developed diabetes, 55% were expected to survive to age 80 years. The expected annual expenditure for a person diagnosed with diabetes at age 40 years declined from $8,500 per year at age 40 years to $3,400 at age 80 years, whereas the expenses for a comparable person without diabetes declined from $3,900 to $3,200 over that same interval. […] People diagnosed with diabetes at age 40 years lived with the disease for an average of 34 years after diagnosis. Those diagnosed when older lived fewer years and, therefore, lost fewer years of life. […] The annual excess medical spending attributed to diabetes […] was smaller among people who were diagnosed at older ages. For men diagnosed at age 40 years, annual medical spending was $3,700 higher than that of similar men without diabetes; spending was $2,900 higher for those diagnosed at age 50 years; $2,200 higher for those diagnosed at age 60 years; and $2,000 higher for those diagnosed at age 65 years. Among women diagnosed with diabetes, the excess annual medical spending was consistently higher than for men of the same age at diagnosis.”

“Regardless of age at diagnosis, people with diabetes spent considerably more on health care after age 65 years than their nondiabetic counterparts. Health care spending attributed to diabetes after age 65 years ranged from $23,900 to $40,900, depending on sex and age at diagnosis. […] Of the total excess lifetime medical spending among an average diabetic patient diagnosed at age 50 years, prescription medications and inpatient care accounted for 44% and 35% of costs, respectively. Outpatient care and other medical care accounted for 17% and 4% of costs, respectively.”

“Our findings differed from those of studies of the lifetime costs of other chronic conditions. For instance, smokers have a lower average lifetime medical cost than nonsmokers (29) because of their shorter life spans. Smokers have a life expectancy about 10 years less than those who do not smoke (30); life expectancy is 16 years less for those who develop smoking-induced cancers (31). As a result, smoking cessation leads to increased lifetime spending (32). Studies of the lifetime costs for an obese person relative to a person with normal body weight show mixed results: estimated excess lifetime medical costs for people with obesity range from $3,790 less to $39,000 more than costs for those who are nonobese (33,34). […] obesity, when considered alone, results in much lower annual excess medical costs than diabetes (–$940 to $1,150 for obesity vs. $2,000 to $4,700 for diabetes) when compared with costs for people who are nonobese (33,34).”

iv. Severe Hypoglycemia and Mortality After Cardiovascular Events for Type 1 Diabetic Patients in Sweden.

“This study examines factors associated with all-cause mortality after cardiovascular complications (myocardial infarction [MI] and stroke) in patients with type 1 diabetes. In particular, we aim to determine whether a previous history of severe hypoglycemia is associated with increased mortality after a cardiovascular event in type 1 diabetic patients.

Hypoglycemia is the most common and dangerous acute complication of type 1 diabetes and can be life threatening if not promptly treated (1). The average individual with type 1 diabetes experiences about two episodes of symptomatic hypoglycemia per week, with an annual prevalence of 30–40% for hypoglycemic episodes requiring assistance for recovery (2). We define severe hypoglycemia to be an episode of hypoglycemia that requires hospitalization in this study. […] Patients with type 1 diabetes are more susceptible to hypoglycemia than those with type 2 diabetes, and therefore it is potentially of greater relevance if severe hypoglycemia is associated with mortality (6).”

“This study uses a large linked data set comprising health records from the Swedish National Diabetes Register (NDR), which were linked to administrative records on hospitalization, prescriptions, and national death records. […] [The] study is based on data from four sources: 1) risk factor data from the Swedish NDR […], 2) hospital records of inpatient episodes from the National Inpatients Register (IPR) […], 3) death records […], and 4) prescription data records […]. A study comparing registered diagnoses in the IPR with information in medical records found positive predictive values of IPR diagnoses were 85–95% for most diagnoses (8). In terms of NDR coverage, a recent study found that 91% of those aged 18–34 years and with type 1 diabetes in the Prescribed Drug Register could be matched with those in the NDR for 2007–2009 (9).”

“The outcome of the study was all-cause mortality after a major cardiovascular complication (MI or stroke). Our sample for analysis included patients with type 1 diabetes who visited a clinic after 2002 and experienced a major cardiovascular complication after this clinic visit. […] We define type 1 diabetes as diabetes diagnosed under the age of 30 years, being reported as being treated with insulin only at some clinic visit, and when alive, having had at least one prescription for insulin filled per year between 2006 and 2010 […], and not having filled a prescription for metformin at any point between July 2005 and December 2010 (under the assumption that metformin users were more likely to be type 2 diabetes patients).”

“Explanatory variables included in both models were type of complication (MI or stroke), age at complication, duration of diabetes, sex, smoking status, HbA1c, BMI, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, chronic kidney disease status based on estimated glomerular filtration rate, microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria status, HDL, LDL, total–to–HDL cholesterol ratio, triglycerides, lipid medication status, clinic visits within the year prior to the CVD event, and prior hospitalization events: hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, MI, stroke, heart failure, AF, amputation, PVD, ESRD, IHD/unstable angina, PCI, and CABG. The last known value for each clinical risk factor, prior to the cardiovascular complication, was used for analysis. […] Initially, all explanatory variables were included and excluded if the variable was not statistically significant at a 5% level (P < 0.05) via stepwise backward elimination.” [Aaaaaaargh! – US. These guys are doing a lot of things right, but this is not one of them. Just to mention this one more time: “Generally, hypothesis testing is a very poor basis for model selection […] There is no statistical theory that supports the notion that hypothesis testing with a fixed α level is a basis for model selection.” (Burnham & Anderson)]

“Patients who had prior hypoglycemic events had an estimated HR for mortality of 1.79 (95% CI 1.37–2.35) in the first 28 days after a CVD event and an estimated HR of 1.25 (95% CI 1.02–1.53) of mortality after 28 days post CVD event in the backward regression model. The univariate analysis showed a similar result compared with the backward regression model, with prior hypoglycemic events having an estimated HR for mortality of 1.79 (95% CI 1.38–2.32) and 1.35 (95% CI 1.11–1.65) in the logistic and Cox regressions, respectively. Even when all explanatory factors were included in the models […], the mortality increase associated with a prior severe hypoglycemic event was still significant, and the P values and SE are similar when compared with the backward stepwise regression. Similarly, when explanatory factors were included individually, the mortality increase associated with a prior severe hypoglycemic event was also still significant.” [Again, this sort of testing scheme is probably not a good approach to getting at a good explanatory model, but it’s what they did – US]

“The 5-year cumulative estimated mortality risk for those without complications after MI and stroke were 40.1% (95% CI 35.2–45.1) and 30.4% (95% CI 26.3–34.6), respectively. Patients with prior heart failure were at the highest estimated 5-year cumulative mortality risk, with those who suffered an MI and stroke having a 56.0% (95% CI 47.5–64.5) and 44.0% (95% CI 35.8–52.2) 5-year cumulative mortality risk, respectively. Patients who had a prior severe hypoglycemic event and suffered an MI had an estimated 5-year cumulative mortality risk at age 60 years of 52.4% (95% CI 45.3–59.5), and those who suffered a stroke had a 5-year cumulative mortality risk of 39.8% (95% CI 33.4–46.3). Patients at age 60 years who suffer a major CVD complication have over twofold risk of 5-year mortality compared with the general type 1 diabetic Swedish population, who had an estimated 5-year mortality risk of 13.8% (95% CI 12.0–16.1).”

“We found evidence that prior severe hypoglycemia is associated with reduced survival after a major CVD event but no evidence that prior severe hypoglycemia is associated with an increased risk of a subsequent CVD event.

Compared with the general type 1 diabetic Swedish population, a major CVD complication increased 5-year mortality risk at age 60 years by >25% and 15% in patients with an MI and stroke, respectively. Patients with a history of a hypoglycemic event had an even higher mortality after a major CVD event, with approximately an additional 10% being dead at the 5-year mark. This risk was comparable with that in those with late-stage kidney disease. This information is useful in determining the prognosis of patients after a major cardiovascular event and highlights the need to include this as a risk factor in simulation models (18) that are used to improve decision making (19).”

“This is the first study that has found some evidence of a dose-response relationship, where patients who experienced two or more severe hypoglycemic events had higher mortality after a cardiovascular event compared with those who experienced one severe hypoglycemic event. A lack of statistical power prevented us from investigating this further when we tried to stratify by number of prior severe hypoglycemic events in our regression models. There was no evidence of a dose-response relationship between repeated episodes of severe hypoglycemia and vascular outcomes or death in previous type 2 diabetes studies (5).”

v. Alterations in White Matter Structure in Young Children With Type 1 Diabetes.

“Careful regulation of insulin dosing, dietary intake, and activity levels are essential for optimal glycemic control in individuals with type 1 diabetes. However, even with optimal treatment many children with type 1 diabetes have blood glucose levels in the hyperglycemic range for more than half the day and in the hypoglycemic range for an hour or more each day (1). Brain cells may be especially sensitive to aberrant blood glucose levels, as glucose is the brain’s principal substrate for its energy needs.

Research in animal models has shown that white matter (WM) may be especially sensitive to dysglycemia-associated insult in diabetes (24). […] Early childhood is a period of rapid myelination and brain development (6) and of increased sensitivity to insults affecting the brain (6,7). Hence, study of the developing brain is particularly important in type 1 diabetes.”

“WM structure can be measured with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), a method based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that uses the movement of water molecules to characterize WM brain structure (8,9). Results are commonly reported in terms of mathematical scalars (representing vectors in vector space) such as fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD), and radial diffusivity (RD). FA reflects the degree of diffusion anisotropy of water (how diffusion varies along the three axes) within a voxel (three-dimensional pixel) and is determined by fiber diameter and density, myelination, and intravoxel fiber-tract coherence (increases in which would increase FA), as well as extracellular diffusion and interaxonal spacing (increases in which would decrease FA) (10). AD, a measure of water diffusivity along the main axis of diffusion within a voxel, is thought to reflect fiber coherence and structure of axonal membranes (increases in which would increase AD), as well as microtubules, neurofilaments, and axonal branching (increases in which would decrease AD) (11,12). RD, the mean of the diffusivities perpendicular to the vector with the largest eigenvalue, is thought to represent degree of myelination (13,14) (more myelin would decrease RD values) and axonal “leakiness” (which would increase RD). Often, however, a combination of these WM characteristics results in opposing contributions to the final observed FA/AD/RD value, and thus DTI scalars should not be interpreted globally as “good” or “bad” (15). Rather, these scalars can show between-group differences and relationships between WM structure and clinical variables and are suggestive of underlying histology. Definitive conclusions about histology of WM can only be derived from direct microscopic examination of biological tissue.”

“Children (ages 4 to <10 years) with type 1 diabetes (n = 127) and age-matched nondiabetic control subjects (n = 67) had diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans in this multisite neuroimaging study. Participants with type 1 diabetes were assessed for HbA1c history and lifetime adverse events, and glucose levels were monitored using a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) device and standardized measures of cognition.

RESULTS Between-group analysis showed that children with type 1 diabetes had significantly reduced axial diffusivity (AD) in widespread brain regions compared with control subjects. Within the type 1 diabetes group, earlier onset of diabetes was associated with increased radial diffusivity (RD) and longer duration was associated with reduced AD, reduced RD, and increased fractional anisotropy (FA). In addition, HbA1c values were significantly negatively associated with FA values and were positively associated with RD values in widespread brain regions. Significant associations of AD, RD, and FA were found for CGM measures of hyperglycemia and glucose variability but not for hypoglycemia. Finally, we observed a significant association between WM structure and cognitive ability in children with type 1 diabetes but not in control subjects. […] These results suggest vulnerability of the developing brain in young children to effects of type 1 diabetes associated with chronic hyperglycemia and glucose variability.”

“The profile of reduced overall AD in type 1 diabetes observed here suggests possible axonal damage associated with diabetes (30). Reduced AD was associated with duration of type 1 diabetes suggesting that longer exposure to diabetes worsens the insult to WM structure. However, measures of hyperglycemia and glucose variability were either not associated or were positively associated with AD values, suggesting that these measures did not contribute to the observed decreased AD in the type 1 diabetes group. A possible explanation for these observations is that several biological processes influence WM structure in type 1 diabetes. Some processes may be related to insulin insufficiency or C-peptide levels independent of glucose levels (31,32) and may affect WM coherence (and reduce AD values as observed in the between-group results). Other processes related to hyperglycemia and glucose variability may target myelin (resulting in reduced FA and increased RD) as well as reduced axonal branching (both would result in increased AD values). Alternatively, these seemingly conflicting AD observations may be due to a dominant effect of age, which could overshadow effects from dysglycemia.

Early age of onset is one of the most replicable risk factors for cognitive impairments in type 1 diabetes (33,34). It has been hypothesized that young children are especially vulnerable to brain insults resulting from episodes of chronic hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and acute hypoglycemic complications of type 1 diabetes (seizures and severe hypoglycemic episodes). In addition, fear of hypoglycemia often results in caregivers maintaining relatively higher blood glucose to avoid lows altogether (1), especially in very young children. However, our study suggests that this approach of aggressive hypoglycemia avoidance resulting in hyperglycemia may not be optimal and may be detrimental to WM structure in young children.

Neuronal damage (reflected in altered WM structure) may affect neuronal signal transfer and, thus, cognition (35). Cognitive domains commonly reported to be affected in children with type 1 diabetes include general intellectual ability, visuospatial abilities, attention, memory, processing speed, and executive function (3638). In our sample, even though the duration of illness was relatively short (2.9 years on average), there were modest but significant cognitive differences between children with type 1 diabetes and control subjects (24).”

“In summary, we present results from the largest study to date investigating WM structure in very young children with type 1 diabetes. We observed significant and widespread brain differences in the WM microstructure of children with type 1 diabetes compared with nondiabetic control subjects and significant associations between WM structure and measures of hyperglycemia, glucose variability, and cognitive ability in the type 1 diabetic population.”

vi. Ultrasound Findings After Surgical Decompression of the Tarsal Tunnel in Patients With Painful Diabetic Polyneuropathy: A Prospective Randomized Study.

“Polyneuropathy is a common complication in diabetes. The prevalence of neuropathy in patients with diabetes is ∼30%. During the course of the disease, up to 50% of the patients will eventually develop neuropathy (1). Its clinical features are characterized by numbness, tingling, or burning sensations and typically extend in a distinct stocking and glove pattern. Prevention plays a key role since poor glucose control is a major risk factor in the development of diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) (1,2).

There is no clear definition for the onset of painful diabetic neuropathy. Different hypotheses have been formulated.

Hyperglycemia in diabetes can lead to osmotic swelling of the nerves, related to increased glucose conversion into sorbitol by the enzyme aldose reductase (2,3). High sorbitol concentrations might also directly cause axonal degeneration and demyelination (2). Furthermore, stiffening and thickening of ligamental structures and the plantar fascia make underlying structures more prone to biomechanical compression (46). A thicker and stiffer retinaculum might restrict movements and lead to alterations of the nerve in the tarsal tunnel.

Both swelling of the nerve and changes in the tarsal tunnel might lead to nerve damage through compression.

Furthermore, vascular changes may diminish endoneural blood flow and oxygen distribution. Decreased blood supply in the (compressed) nerve might lead to ischemic damage as well as impaired nerve regeneration.

Several studies suggest that surgical decompression of nerves at narrow anatomic sites, e.g., the tarsal tunnel, is beneficial and has a positive effect on pain, sensitivity, balance, long-term risk of ulcers and amputations, and quality of life (3,710). Since the effect of decompression of the tibial nerve in patients with DPN has not been proven with a randomized clinical trial, its contribution as treatment for patients with painful DPN is still controversial. […] In this study, we compare the mean CSA and any changes in shape of the tibial nerve before and after decompression of the tarsal tunnel using ultrasound in order to test the hypothesis that the tarsal tunnel leads to compression of the tibial nerve in patients with DPN.”

“This study, with a large sample size and standardized sonographic imaging procedure with a good reliability, is the first randomized controlled trial that evaluates the effect of decompression of the tibial nerve on the CSA. Although no effect on CSA after surgery was found, this study using ultrasound demonstrates a larger and swollen tibial nerve and thicker flexor retinaculum at the ankle in patients with DPN compared with healthy control subjects.”

I would have been interested to know if there were any observable changes in symptom relief measures post-surgery, even if such variables are less ‘objective’ than measures like CSA (less objective, but perhaps more relevant to the patient…), but the authors did not look at those kinds of variables.

vii. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Is Independently Associated With an Increased Incidence of Chronic Kidney Disease in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes.

“Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has reached epidemic proportions worldwide (1). Up to 30% of adults in the U.S. and Europe have NAFLD, and the prevalence of this disease is much higher in people with diabetes (1,2). Indeed, the prevalence of NAFLD on ultrasonography ranges from ∼50 to 70% in patients with type 2 diabetes (35) and ∼40 to 50% in patients with type 1 diabetes (6,7). Notably, patients with diabetes and NAFLD are also more likely to develop more advanced forms of NAFLD that may result in end-stage liver disease (8). However, accumulating evidence indicates that NAFLD is associated not only with liver-related morbidity and mortality but also with an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) and other serious extrahepatic complications (810).”

“Increasing evidence indicates that NAFLD is strongly associated with an increased risk of CKD [chronic kidney disease, US] in people with and without diabetes (11). Indeed, we have previously shown that NAFLD is associated with an increased prevalence of CKD in patients with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes (1517), and that NAFLD independently predicts the development of incident CKD in patients with type 2 diabetes (18). However, many of the risk factors for CKD are different in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and to date, it is uncertain whether NAFLD is an independent risk factor for incident CKD in type 1 diabetes or whether measurement of NAFLD improves risk prediction for CKD, taking account of traditional risk factors for CKD.

Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate 1) whether NAFLD is associated with an increased incidence of CKD and 2) whether measurement of NAFLD improves risk prediction for CKD, adjusting for traditional risk factors, in type 1 diabetic patients.”

“Using a retrospective, longitudinal cohort study design, we have initially identified from our electronic database all Caucasian type 1 diabetic outpatients with preserved kidney function (i.e., estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m2) and with no macroalbuminuria (n = 563), who regularly attended our adult diabetes clinic between 1999 and 2001. Type 1 diabetes was diagnosed by the typical presentation of disease, the absolute dependence on insulin treatment for survival, the presence of undetectable fasting C-peptide concentrations, and the presence of anti–islet cell autoantibodies. […] Overall, 261 type 1 diabetic outpatients were included in the final analysis and were tested for the development of incident CKD during the follow-up period […] All participants were periodically seen (every 3–6 months) for routine medical examinations of glycemic control and chronic complications of diabetes. No participants were lost to follow-up. […] For this study, the development of incident CKD was defined as occurrence of eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 and/or macroalbuminuria (21). Both of these outcome measures were confirmed in all participants in a least two consecutive occasions (within 3–6 months after the first examination).”

“At baseline, the mean eGFRMDRD was 92 ± 23 mL/min/1.73 m2 (median 87.9 [IQR 74–104]), or eGFREPI was 98.6 ± 19 mL/min/1.73 m2 (median 99.7 [84–112]). Most patients (n = 234; 89.7%) had normal albuminuria, whereas 27 patients (10.3%) had microalbuminuria. NAFLD was present in 131 patients (50.2%). […] At baseline, patients who developed CKD at follow-up were older, more likely to be female and obese, and had a longer duration of diabetes than those who did not. These patients also had higher values of systolic blood pressure, A1C, triglycerides, serum GGT, and urinary ACR and lower values of eGFRMDRD and eGFREPI. Moreover, there was a higher percentage of patients with hypertension, metabolic syndrome, microalbuminuria, and some degree of diabetic retinopathy in patients who developed CKD at follow-up compared with those remaining free from CKD. The proportion using antihypertensive drugs (that always included the use of ACE inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers) was higher in those who progressed to CKD. Notably, […] this patient group also had a substantially higher frequency of NAFLD on ultrasonography.”

“During follow-up (mean duration 5.2 ± 1.7 years, range 2–10), 61 patients developed CKD using the MDRD study equation to estimate eGFR (i.e., ∼4.5% of participants progressed every year to eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 or macroalbuminuria). Of these, 28 developed an eGFRMDRD <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 with abnormal albuminuria (micro- or macroalbuminuria), 21 developed a reduced eGFRMDRD with normal albuminuria (but 9 of them had some degree of diabetic retinopathy at baseline), and 12 developed macroalbuminuria alone. None of them developed kidney failure requiring chronic dialysis. […] The annual eGFRMDRD decline for the whole cohort was 2.68 ± 3.5 mL/min/1.73 m2 per year. […] NAFLD patients had a greater annual decline in eGFRMDRD than those without NAFLD at baseline (3.28 ± 3.8 vs. 2.10 ± 3.0 mL/min/1.73 m2 per year, P < 0.005). Similarly, the frequency of a renal functional decline (arbitrarily defined as ≥25% loss of baseline eGFRMDRD) was greater among those with NAFLD than among those without the disease (26 vs. 11%, P = 0.005). […] Interestingly, BMI was not significantly associated with CKD.”

“Our novel findings indicate that NAFLD is strongly associated with an increased incidence of CKD during a mean follow-up of 5 years and that measurement of NAFLD improves risk prediction for CKD, independently of traditional risk factors (age, sex, diabetes duration, A1C, hypertension, baseline eGFR, and microalbuminuria [i.e., the last two factors being the strongest known risk factors for CKD]), in type 1 diabetic adults. Additionally, although NAFLD was strongly associated with obesity, obesity (or increased BMI) did not explain the association between NAFLD and CKD. […] The annual cumulative incidence rate of CKD in our cohort of patients (i.e., ∼4.5% per year) was essentially comparable to that previously described in other European populations with type 1 diabetes and similar baseline characteristics (∼2.5–9% of patients who progressed every year to CKD) (25,26). In line with previously published information (2528), we also found that hypertension, microalbuminuria, and lower eGFR at baseline were strong predictors of incident CKD in type 1 diabetic patients.”

“There is a pressing and unmet need to determine whether NAFLD is associated with a higher risk of CKD in people with type 1 diabetes. It has only recently been recognized that NAFLD represents an important burden of disease for type 2 diabetic patients (11,17,18), but the magnitude of the problem of NAFLD and its association with risk of CKD in type 1 diabetes is presently poorly recognized. Although there is clear evidence that NAFLD is closely associated with a higher prevalence of CKD both in those without diabetes (11) and in those with type 1 and type 2 diabetes (1517), only four prospective studies have examined the association between NAFLD and risk of incident CKD (18,2931), and only one of these studies was published in patients with type 2 diabetes (18). […] The underlying mechanisms responsible for the observed association between NAFLD and CKD are not well understood. […] The possible clinical implication for these findings is that type 1 diabetic patients with NAFLD may benefit from more intensive surveillance or early treatment interventions to decrease the risk for CKD. Currently, there is no approved treatment for NAFLD. However, NAFLD and CKD share numerous cardiometabolic risk factors, and treatment strategies for NAFLD and CKD should be similar and aimed primarily at modifying the associated cardiometabolic risk factors.”

 

October 25, 2017 Posted by | Cardiology, Diabetes, Epidemiology, Genetics, Health Economics, Medicine, Nephrology, Neurology, Pharmacology, Statistics, Studies | Leave a comment

A few diabetes papers of interest

i. Burden of Diabetic Foot Ulcers for Medicare and Private Insurers.

Some observations from the paper (my bold):

According to the American Diabetes Association, the annual cost of diabetes, which affects 22.3 million people in the U.S., was $245 billion in 2012: $176 billion in excess health care expenditures and $69 billion in reduced workforce productivity (1). While much of the excess health care cost is attributable to treatment of diabetes itself, a substantial amount of the cost differential arises via treatment of chronic complications such as those related to the heart, kidneys, and nervous system (1).

One common complication of diabetes is the development of foot ulcers. Historically, foot ulcers have been estimated to affect 1–4% of patients with diabetes annually (2,3) and as many as 25% of the patients with diabetes over their lifetimes (2). More recently, Margolis et al. (3) have estimated that the annual incidence of foot ulcers among patients with diabetes may be as high as 6%. Treatment of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) includes conventional wound management (e.g., debridement, moist dressings, and offloading areas of high pressure or friction) as well as more sophisticated treatments such as bioengineered cellular technologies and hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) (4).

DFUs often require extensive healing time and are associated with increased risk for infections and other sequelae that can result in severe and costly outcomes (4). […] DFU patients have a low survival prognosis, with a 3-year cumulative mortality rate of 28% (6) and rates among amputated patients approaching 50% (7).”

“While DFU patients can require substantial amounts of resource use, little is known about the burden of DFUs imposed on the U.S. health care system and payers. In fact, we are aware of only two studies to date that have estimated the incremental medical resource use and costs of DFU beyond that of diabetes alone (6,8). Neither of these analyses, however, accounted for the many underlying differences between DFU and non-DFU patient populations, such as disproportionate presence of costly underlying comorbid conditions among DFU patients […] Other existing literature on the burden of DFUs in the U.S. calculated the overall health care costs (as opposed to incremental) without reference to a non-DFU control population (911). As a result of the variety of data and methodologies used, it is not surprising that the burden of DFUs reported in the literature is wide-ranging, with the average per-patient costs, for example, ranging from $4,595 per episode (9) to over $35,000 annually for all services (6).

The objective of this study was to expand and improve on previous research to provide a more robust, current estimate of incremental clinical and economic burden of DFUs. To do so, this analysis examined the differences in medical resource use and costs between patients with DFUs during a recent time period (January 2007–September 2011) and a matched control population with diabetes but without DFUs, using administrative claims records from nationally representative databases for Medicare and privately insured populations. […] [Our] criteria resulted in a final analytic sample of 231,438 Medicare patients, with 29,681 (12.8%) identified as DFU patients and the remaining 201,757 comprising the potential control population of non-DFU diabetic patients. For private insurance, 119,018 patients met the sample selection criteria, with 5,681 (4.8%) DFU patients and 113,337 potential controls (Fig. 1).”

Prior to matching, DFU patients were statistically different from the non-DFU control population on nearly every dimension examined during the 12-month preindex period. […] The matching process resulted in the identification of 27,878 pairs of DFU and control patients for Medicare and 4,536 pairs for private insurance that were very similar with regards to preindex patient characteristics […] [I]mportantly, the matched DFU and control groups had comparable health care costs during the 12 months prior to the index date (Medicare, $17,744 DFU and controls; private insurance, $14,761 DFU vs. $14,766 controls). […] Despite having matched the groups to ensure similar patient characteristics, DFU patients used significantly (P < 0.0001) more medical resources during the 12-month follow-up period than did the matched controls […]. Among matched Medicare patients, DFU patients had 138.2% more days hospitalized, 85.4% more days of home health care, 40.6% more ED visits, and 35.1% more outpatient/physician office visits. The results were similar for the privately insured DFU patients, who had 173.5% more days hospitalized, 230.0% more days of home health care, 109.0% more ED visits, and 42.5% more outpatient/physician office visits than matched controls. […] The rate of lower limb amputations was 3.8% among matched Medicare DFU patients and 5.0% among matched privately insured DFU patients. In contrast, observed lower limb amputation rates among diabetic patients without foot ulcer were only 0.04% in Medicare and 0.02% in private insurance.”

Increased medical resource utilization resulted in DFU patients having approximately twice the costs as the matched non-DFU controls […], with annual incremental per-patient medical costs ranging from $11,710 for Medicare ($28,031 vs. $16,320; P < 0.0001) to $15,890 for private insurance ($26,881 vs. $10,991; P < 0.0001). All places of service (i.e., inpatient, ED, outpatient/physician office, home health care, and other) contributed approximately equally to the cost differential among Medicare patients. For the privately insured, however, increased inpatient costs ($17,061 vs. $6,501; P < 0.0001) were responsible for nearly two-thirds of the overall cost differential, […] resulting in total incremental direct health care (i.e., medical + prescription drug) costs of $16,883 ($31,419 vs. $14,536; P < 0.0001). Substantial proportions of the incremental medical costs were attributable to claims with DFU-related diagnoses or procedures for both Medicare (45.1%) and privately insured samples (60.3%).”

“Of the 4,536 matched pairs of privately insured patients, work-loss information was available for 575 DFU patients and 857 controls. DFU patients had $3,259 in excess work-loss costs ($6,311 vs. $3,052; P < 0.0001) compared with matched controls, with disability and absenteeism comprising $1,670 and $1,589 of the overall differential, respectively […] The results indicate that compared with diabetic patients without foot ulcers, DFU patients miss more days of work due to medical-related absenteeism and to disability, imposing additional burden on employers.”

“These estimates indicate that DFU imposes substantial burden on payers beyond that required to treat diabetes itself. For example, prior research has estimated annual per-patient incremental health care expenditures for patients with diabetes (versus those without diabetes) of approximately $7,900 (1). The estimates of this analysis suggest that the presence of DFU further compounds these incremental treatment costs by adding $11,710 to $16,883 per patient. Stated differently, the results indicate that the excess health care costs of DFU are approximately twice that attributable to treatment of diabetes itself, and that the presence of DFU approximately triples the excess cost differential versus a population of patients without diabetes.

“Using estimates of the total U.S. diabetes population (22.3 million) (1) and the midpoint (3.5%) of annual DFU incidence estimates (1–6%) (2,3), the results of this analysis suggest an annual incremental payer burden of DFU ranging from $9.1 billion (22.3 million patients with diabetes × 3.5% DFU incidence × $11,710 Medicare cost differential) to $13.2 billion (22.3 million patients with diabetes × 3.5% DFU incidence × $16,883 private insurance cost differential). These estimates, moreover, likely understate the actual burden of DFU because the incremental costs referenced in this calculation do not include excess work-loss costs described above, prescription drug costs for Medicare patients, out-of-pocket costs paid by the patient, costs borne by supplemental insurers, and other (non-work loss) indirect costs such as those associated with premature mortality, reduced quality of life, and informal caregiving.”

ii. Contributors to Mortality in High-Risk Diabetic Patients in the Diabetes Heart Study.

“Rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD) are two- to fourfold greater in individuals with type 2 diabetes compared with nondiabetic individuals, and up to 65% of all-cause mortality among individuals with type 2 diabetes is attributed to CVD (1,2). However, the risk profile is not uniform for all individuals affected by diabetes (35). Coronary artery calcified plaque (CAC), determined using computed tomography, is a measure of CVD burden (6,7). CAC scores have been shown to be an independent predictor of CVD outcomes and mortality in population-based studies (810) and a powerful predictor of all-cause and CVD mortality in individuals affected by type 2 diabetes (4,1115).

In the Diabetes Heart Study (DHS), individuals with CAC >1,000 were found to have greater than 6-fold (16) and 11-fold (17) increased risk for all-cause mortality and CVD mortality, respectively, after 7 years of follow-up. With this high risk for adverse outcomes, it is noteworthy that >50% of the DHS sample with CAC >1,000 have lived with this CVD burden for (now) an average of over 12 years. This suggests that outcomes vary in the type 2 diabetic patient population, even among individuals with the highest risk. This study examined the subset of DHS participants with CAC >1,000 and evaluated whether differences in a range of clinical factors and measurements, including modifiable CVD risk factors, provided further insights into risk for mortality.”

“This investigation focused on 371 high-risk participants (from 260 families) […] The goal of this analysis was to identify clinical and other characteristics that influence risk for all-cause mortality in high-risk (baseline CAC >1,000) DHS participants. […] a predominance of traditional CVD risk factors, including older age, male sex, elevated BMI, and high rates of dyslipidemia and hypertension, was evident in this high-risk subgroup (Table 1). These participants were followed for 8.2 ± 3.0 years (mean ± SD), over which time 41% died. […] a number of indices continued to significantly predict outcome following adjustment for other CVD risk factors (including age, sex, and medication use) […]. Higher cholesterol and LDL concentrations were associated with an increased risk (∼1.3-fold) for mortality […] Slightly larger increases in risk for mortality were observed with changes in kidney function (1.3- to 1.4-fold) and elevated CRP (∼1.4-fold) […] use of cholesterol-lowering medication was less common among the deceased participants; those reporting no use of cholesterol-lowering medication at baseline were at a 1.4-fold increased risk of mortality […] these results confirm that, even among this high-risk group, heterogeneity in known CVD risk factors and associations with adverse outcomes are still observed and support their ongoing consideration as useful tools for individual risk assessment. Finally, the data presented here suggest that use of cholesterol-lowering medication was strongly associated with protection, supporting the known beneficial effects of cholesterol management on CVD risk (28,29). […] data suggest that cholesterol-lowering medications may be used less than recommended and need to be more aggressively targeted as a critical modifiable risk factor.”

iii. Neurological Consequences of Diabetic Ketoacidosis at Initial Presentation of Type 1 Diabetes in a Prospective Cohort Study of Children.

“Patients aged 6–18 years with and without DKA at diagnosis were studied at four time points: <48 h, 5 days, 28 days, and 6 months postdiagnosis. Patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy with cognitive assessment at each time point. Relationships between clinical characteristics at presentation and MRI and neurologic outcomes were examined using multiple linear regression, repeated-measures, and ANCOVA analyses.”

“With DKA, cerebral white matter showed the greatest alterations with increased total white matter volume and higher mean diffusivity in the frontal, temporal, and parietal white matter. Total white matter volume decreased over the first 6 months. For gray matter in DKA patients, total volume was lower at baseline and increased over 6 months. […] Of note, although changes in total and regional brain volumes over the first 5 days resolved, they were associated with poorer delayed memory recall and poorer sustained and divided attention at 6 months. Age at time of presentation and pH level were predictors of neuroimaging and functional outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS DKA at type 1 diabetes diagnosis results in morphologic and functional brain changes. These changes are associated with adverse neurocognitive outcomes in the medium term.”

“This study highlights the common nature of transient focal cerebral edema and associated impaired mental state at presentation with new-onset type 1 diabetes in children. We demonstrate that alterations occur most markedly in cerebral white matter, particularly in the frontal lobes, and are most prominent in the youngest children with the most dramatic acidemia. […] early brain changes were associated with persisting alterations in attention and memory 6 months later. Children with DKA did not differ in age, sex, SES, premorbid need for school assistance/remediation, or postdiagnosis clinical trajectory. Earlier diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in children may avoid the complication of DKA and the neurological consequences documented in this study and is worthy of a major public health initiative.”

“In relation to clinical risk factors, the degree of acidosis and younger age appeared to be the greatest risk factors for alterations in cerebral structure. […] cerebral volume changes in the frontal, temporal, and parietal regions in the first week after diagnosis were associated with lower attention and memory scores 6 months later, suggesting that functional information processing difficulties persist after resolution of tissue water increases in cerebral white matter. These findings have not been reported to date but are consistent with the growing concern over academic performance in children with diabetes (2). […] Brain injury should no longer be considered a rare complication of DKA. This study has shown that it is both frequent and persistent.” (my bold)

iv. Antihypertensive Treatment and Resistant Hypertension in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes by Stages of Diabetic Nephropathy.

“High blood pressure (BP) is a risk factor for coronary artery disease, heart failure, and stroke, as well as for chronic kidney disease. Furthermore, hypertension has been estimated to affect ∼30% of patients with type 1 diabetes (1,2) and both parallels and precedes the worsening of kidney disease in these patients (35). […] Despite strong evidence that intensive treatment of elevated BP reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease and microvascular complications, as well as improves the prognosis of patients with diabetic nephropathy (especially with the use of ACE inhibitors [ACEIs] and angiotensin II antagonists [angiotensin receptor blockers, ARBs]) (1,911), treatment targets and recommendations seem difficult to meet in clinical practice (1215). This suggests that the patients might either show poor adherence to the treatment and lifestyle changes or have a suboptimal drug regimen. It is evident that most patients with hypertension might require multiple-drug therapy to reach treatment goals (16). However, certain subgroups of the patients have been considered to have resistant hypertension (RH). RH is defined as office BP that remains above target even after using a minimum of three antihypertensive drugs at maximal tolerated doses, from different classes, one of which is a diuretic. Also, patients with controlled BP using four or more antihypertensive drugs are considered resistant to treatment (17).”

“The true prevalence of RH is unknown, but clinical trials suggest a share between 10 and 30% of the hypertensive patients in the general population (18). […] Only a few studies have considered BP control and treatment in patients with type 1 diabetes (2,15,22). Typically these studies have been limited to a small number of participants, which has not allowed stratifying of the patients according to the nephropathy status. The rate of RH is therefore unknown in patients with type 1 diabetes in general and with respect to different stages of diabetic nephropathy. Therefore, we estimated to what extent patients with type 1 diabetes meet the BP targets proposed by the ADA guidelines. We also evaluated the use of antihypertensive medication and the prevalence of RH in the patients stratified by stage of diabetic nephropathy.”

“[A]ll adult patients with type 1 diabetes from >80 hospitals and primary healthcare centers across Finland were asked to participate. Type 1 diabetes was defined by age at onset of diabetes <40 years, C-peptide ≤0.3 nmol/L, and insulin treatment initiated within 1 year of diagnosis, if C-peptide was not measured. […] we used two different ADA BP targets: <130/85 mmHg, which was the target until 2000 (6), and <130/80 mmHg, which was the target between 2001 and 2012 (7). Patients were divided into groups based on whether their BP had reached the target or not and whether the antihypertensive drug was in use or not. […] uncontrolled hypertension was defined as failure to achieve target BP, based on these two different ADA guidelines, despite use of antihypertensive medication. RH was defined as failure to achieve the goal BP (<130/85 mmHg) even after using a minimum of three antihypertensive drugs, from different classes, one of which was a diuretic. […] On the basis of eGFR (mL/min/1.73 m2) level, patients were classified into five groups according to the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (KDOQI) guidelines: stage 1 eGFR ≥90, stage 2 eGFR 60–89, stage 3 eGFR 30–59, stage 4 eGFR 15–29, and stage 5 eGFR <15. Patients who were on dialysis were classified into stage 5. […] A total of 3,678 patients with complete data on systolic and diastolic BP and nephropathy status were identified from the FinnDiane database. […] The mean age was 38.0 ± 12.0 and mean duration of diabetes 22.1 ± 12.3 years.  […] The patients with advanced diabetic nephropathy had higher BP, worse dyslipidemia, poorer glycemic control, and more insulin resistance and macrovascular complications. BMI values were lower in the dialysis patients, probably due to renal cachexia.”

“Of all patients, 60.9% did not reach the BP target <130/85 mmHg, and the proportion was 70.3% with the target of <130/80 mmHg. […] The patients who were not on target had higher age and longer duration of diabetes and were more likely to be men. They also had poorer glycemic and lipid control as well as more micro- and macrovascular complications. […] Based on the BP target <130/85 mmHg, more than half of the patients in the normoalbuminuria group did not reach the BP target, and the share increased along with the worsening of nephropathy; two-thirds of the patients in the microalbuminuria group and fourfifths in the macroalbuminuria group were not on target, while even 90% of the dialysis and kidney transplant patients did not reach the target (Fig. 1A). Based on the stricter BP target of <130/80 mmHg, the numbers were obviously worse, but the trend was the same (Fig. 1B).”

“About 37% of the FinnDiane patients had antihypertensive treatment […] Whereas 14.1% of the patients with normal AER [Albumin Excretion Rate] had antihypertensive treatment, the proportions were 60.5% in the microalbuminuric, 90.3% in the macroalbuminuric, 88.6% in the dialysis, and 91.2% in the kidney transplant patients. However, in all groups, only a minority of the patients had BP values on target with the antihypertensive drug treatment they were prescribed […] The mean numbers of antihypertensive drugs varied within the nephropathy groups between those who had BP on target and those who did not […]. However, only in the micro- (P = 0.02) and macroalbuminuria (P = 0.003) groups were the mean numbers of the drugs higher if the BP was not on target, compared with those who had reached the targets. Notably, among the patients with normoalbuminuria who had not reached the BP target, 58% and, of the patients with microalbuminuria, 61% were taking only one antihypertensive drug. In contrast, more than half of the dialysis and 40% of the macroalbuminuric and transplanted patients, who had not reached the targets, had at least three drugs in their regimen. Moreover, one-fifth of the dialysis, 15% of the macroalbuminuric, and 10% of the transplanted patients had at least four antihypertensive drugs in use without reaching the target (Table 2). Almost all patients treated with antihypertensive drugs in the normo-, micro-, and macroalbuminuria groups (76% of normo-, 93% of micro-, and 89% of macrolbuminuric patients) had ACEIs or ARBs in the regimen. The proportions were lower in the ESRD groups: 42% of the dialysis and 29% of the transplanted patients were taking these drugs.”

“In general, the prevalence of RH was 7.9% for all patients with type 1 diabetes (n = 3,678) and 21.2% for the antihypertensive drug–treated patients (n = 1,370). The proportion was higher in men than in women (10.0 vs. 5.7%, P < 0.0001) […] When the patients were stratified by nephropathy status, the figures changed; in the normoalbuminuria group, the prevalence of RH was 1.2% of all and 8.7% of the drug treated patients. The corresponding numbers were 4.7 and 7.8% for the microalbuminuric patients, 28.1 and 31.2% for the macroalbuminuric patients, 36.6 and 41.3% for the patients on dialysis, and 26.3 and 28.8% for the kidney-transplanted patients, respectively […] The prevalence of RH also increased along with the worsening of renal function. The share was 1.4% for all and 7.4% for drug-treated patients at KDOQI stage 1. The corresponding numbers were 3.8 and 10.0% for the patients at stage 2, 26.6 and 30.0% for the patients at stage 3, 54.8 and 56.0% for the patients at stage 4, and 48.0 and 52.1% for those at stage 5, when kidney transplantation patients were excluded. […] In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, higher age, lower eGFR, higher waist-to-hip ratio, higher triglycerides, as well as microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria, when normoalbuminuria was the reference category, were independently associated with RH […] A separate analysis also showed that dietary sodium intake, based on urinary sodium excretion rate, was independently associated with RH.”

“The current study shows that the prevalence of RH in patients with type 1 diabetes increases alongside the worsening of diabetic nephropathy. Whereas less than one-tenth of the antihypertensive drug–treated patients with normo- or microalbuminuria met the criteria for RH, the proportions were substantially higher among the patients with overt nephropathy: one-third of the patients with macroalbuminuria or a transplanted kidney and even 40% of the patients on dialysis. […] the prevalence of RH for the drug-treated patients was even higher (56%) in patients at the predialysis stage (eGFR 15–29). The findings are consistent with other studies that have demonstrated that chronic kidney disease is a strong predictor of failure to achieve BP targets despite the use of three or more different types of antihypertensive drugs in the general hypertensive population (26).”

“The prevalence of RH was 21.2% of the patients treated with antihypertensive drugs. Previous studies have indicated a prevalence of RH of 13% among patients being treated for hypertension (1921,27). […] the prevalence [of RH] seems to be […] higher among the drug-treated type 1 diabetic patients. These figures can only partly be explained by the use of a lower treatment target for BP, as recommended for patients with diabetes (6), since even when we used the BP target recommended for hypertensive patients (<140/90 mmHg), our data still showed a higher prevalence of RH (17%).”

“The study also confirmed previous findings that a large number of patients with type 1 diabetes do not achieve the recommended BP targets. Although the prevalence of RH increased with the severity of diabetic nephropathy, our data also suggest that patients with normo- and microalbuminuria might have a suboptimal drug regimen, since the majority of those who had not reached the BP target were taking only one antihypertensive drug. […] There is therefore an urgent need to improve antihypertensive treatment, not only in patients with overt nephropathy but also in those who have elevated BP without complications or early signs of renal disease. Moreover, further emphasis should be placed on the transplanted patients, since it is well known that hypertension affects both graft and patient survival negatively (30).” (my bold)

v. Association of Autoimmunity to Autonomic Nervous Structures With Nerve Function in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes: A 16-Year Prospective Study.

“Neuropathy is a chronic complication that includes a number of distinct syndromes and autonomic dysfunctions and contributes to increase morbidity and mortality in the diabetic population. In particular, cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is an independent risk factor for mortality in type 1 diabetes and is associated with poor prognosis and poor quality of life (13). Cardiovascular (CV) autonomic regulation rests upon a balance between sympathetic and parasympathetic innervation of the heart and blood vessels controlling heart rate and vascular dynamics. CAN encompasses several clinical manifestations, from resting tachycardia to fatal arrhythmia and silent myocardial infarction (4).

The mechanisms responsible for altered neural function in diabetes are not fully understood, and it is assumed that multiple mutually perpetuating pathogenic mechanisms may concur. These include dysmetabolic injury, neurovascular insufficiency, deficiency of neurotrophic growth factors and essential fatty acids, advanced glycosylation products (5,6), and autoimmune damage. Independent cross-sectional and prospective (713) studies identified circulating autoantibodies to autonomic nervous structures and hypothesized that immune determinants may be involved in autonomic nerve damage in type 1 diabetes. […] However, demonstration of a cause–effect relationship between antibodies (Ab) and diabetic autonomic neuropathy awaits confirmation.”

“We report on a 16-year follow-up study specifically designed to prospectively examine a cohort of patients with type 1 diabetes and aimed at assessing whether the presence of circulating Ab to autonomic nervous structures is associated with increased risk and predictive value of developing CAN. This, in turn, would be highly suggestive of the involvement of autoimmune mechanisms in the pathogenesis of this complication.”

“The present prospective study, conducted in young patients without established autonomic neuropathy at recruitment and followed for over 16 years until adulthood, strongly indicates that a cause–effect relationship may exist between auto-Ab to autonomic nervous tissues and development of diabetic autonomic neuropathy. Incipient or established CAN (22) reached a prevalence of 68% among the Ab-positive patients, significantly higher compared with the Ab-negative patients. […] Logistic regression analysis indicates that auto-Ab carry an almost 15-fold increased RR of developing an abnormal DB [deep breathing] test over 16 years and an almost sixfold increase of developing at least one abnormal CV [cardiovascular] test, independent of other variables. […] Circulating Ab to autonomic structures are associated with the development of autonomic dysfunction in young diabetic patients independent of glycemic control. […] autoimmune mechanisms targeting sympathetic and parasympathetic structures may play a primary etiologic role in the development and progression of autonomic dysfunction in type 1 diabetes in the long term. […] positivity for auto-Ab had a high positive predictive value for the later development of autonomic neuropathy.”

“Diabetic autonomic neuropathy, possibly the least recognized and most overlooked of diabetes complications, has increasingly gained attention as an independent predictor of silent myocardial ischemia and mortality, as consistently indicated by several cross-sectional studies (2,3,33). The pooled prevalence rate risk for silent ischemia is estimated at 1.96 by meta-analysis studies (5). In this report, established CAN (22) was detected in nearly 20% of young adult patients with acceptable metabolic control, after over approximately 23 years of diabetes duration, against 12% of patients of the same cohort with subtle asymptomatic autonomic dysfunction (one abnormal CV test) a decade earlier, in line with other studies in type 1 diabetes (2,24). Approximately 30% of the patients developed signs of peripheral somatic neuropathy not associated with autonomic dysfunction. This discrepancy suggests the participation of pathogenic mechanisms different from metabolic control and a distinct clinical course, as indicated by the DCCT study, where hyperglycemia had a less robust relationship with autonomic than somatic neuropathy (6).”

“Furthermore, this study shows that autonomic neuropathy, together with female sex and the occurrence of severe hypoglycemia, is a major determinant for poor quality of life in patients with type 1 diabetes. This is in agreement with previous reports (35) and linked to such invalidating symptoms as orthostatic hypotension and chronic diarrhea. […] In conclusion, the current study provides persuasive evidence for a primary pathogenic role of autoimmunity in the development of autonomic diabetic neuropathy. However, the mechanisms through which auto-Ab impair their target organ function, whether through classical complement action, proapoptotic effects of complement, enhanced antigen presentation, or channelopathy (26,39,40), remain to be elucidated.” (my bold)

vi. Body Composition Is the Main Determinant for the Difference in Type 2 Diabetes Pathophysiology Between Japanese and Caucasians.

“According to current understanding, the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes is different in Japanese compared with Caucasians in the sense that Japanese are unable to compensate insulin resistance with increased insulin secretion to the same extent as Caucasians. Prediabetes and early stage diabetes in Japanese are characterized by reduced β-cell function combined with lower degree of insulin resistance compared with Caucasians (810). In a prospective, cross-sectional study of individuals with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), it was demonstrated that Japanese in Japan were more insulin sensitive than Mexican Americans in the U.S. and Arabs in Israel (11). The three populations also differed with regards to β-cell response, whereas the disposition index — a measure of insulin secretion relative to insulin resistance — was similar across ethnicities for NGT and IGT participants. These studies suggest that profound differences in type 2 diabetes pathophysiology exist between different populations. However, few attempts have been made to establish the underlying demographic or lifestyle-related factors such as body composition, physical fitness, and physical activity leading to these differences.”

“The current study aimed at comparing Japanese and Caucasians at various glucose tolerance states, with respect to 1) insulin sensitivity and β-cell response and 2) the role of demographic, genetic, and lifestyle-related factors as underlying predictors for possible ethnic differences in insulin sensitivity and β-cell response. […] In our study, glucose profiles from OGTTs [oral glucose tolerance tests] were similar in Japanese and Caucasians, whereas insulin and C-peptide responses were lower in Japanese participants compared with Caucasians. In line with these observations, measures of β-cell response were generally lower in Japanese, who simultaneously had higher insulin sensitivity. Moreover, β-cell response relative to the degree of insulin resistance as measured by disposition indices was virtually identical in the two populations. […] We […] confirmed the existence of differences in insulin sensitivity and β-cell response between Japanese and Caucasians and showed for the first time that a major part of these differences can be explained by differences in body composition […]. On the basis of these results, we propose a similar pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes in Caucasians and Japanese with respect to insulin sensitivity and β-cell function.”

October 12, 2017 Posted by | Cardiology, Diabetes, Epidemiology, Health Economics, Medicine, Nephrology, Neurology, Pharmacology, Studies | Leave a comment

Diabetes and the Brain (V)

I have blogged this book in some detail in the past, but I never really finished my intended coverage of the book. This post is an attempt to rectify this.

Below I have added some quotes and observations from some of the chapters I have not covered in my previous posts about the book. I bolded some key observations along the way.

A substantial number of studies have assessed the effect of type 2 diabetes on cognitive functioning with psychometric tests. The majority of these studies reported subtle decrements in individuals with type 2 diabetes relative to non-diabetic controls (2, 4). […] the majority of studies in patients with type 2 diabetes reported moderate reductions in neuropsychological test performance, mainly in memory, information-processing speed, and mental flexibility, a pattern that is also observed in aging-related cognitive decline. […] the observed cognitive decrements are relatively subtle and rather non-specific. […] All in all, disturbances in glucose and insulin metabolism and associated vascular risk factors are associated with modest reductions in cognitive performance in “pre-diabetic stages.” Consequently, it may well be that the cognitive decrements that can be observed in patients with type 2 diabetes also start to develop before the actual onset of the diabetes. […] Because the different vascular and metabolic risk factors that are clustered in the metabolic syndrome are strongly interrelated, the contribution of each of the individual factor will be difficult to assess.” 

“Aging-related changes on brain imaging include vascular lesions and focal and global atrophy. Vascular lesions include (silent) brain infarcts and white-matter hyperintensities (WMHs). WMHs are common in the general population and their prevalence increases with age, approaching 100% by the age of 85 (69). The prevalence of lacunar infarcts also increases with age, up to 5% for symptomatic infarcts and 30% for silent infarcts by the age of 80 (70). In normal aging, the brain gradually reduces in size, which becomes particularly evident after the age of 70 (71). This loss of brain volume is global […] age-related changes of the brain […] are often relatively more pronounced in older patients with type 2 […] A recent systematic review showed that patients with diabetes have a 2-fold increased risk of (silent) infarcts compared to non-diabetic persons (75). The relationship between type 2 diabetes and WMHs is subject to debate. […] there are now clear indications that diabetes is a risk factor for WMH progression (82). […] The presence of the APOE ε4 allele is a risk factor for the development of Alzheimer’s disease (99). Patients with type 2 diabetes who carry the APOE ε4 allele appeared to have a 2-fold increased risk of dementia compared to persons with either of these risk factors in isolation (100, 101).”

In adults with type 1 diabetes the occurrence of microvascular complications is associated with reduced cognitive performance (137) and accelerated cognitive decline (138). Moreover, type 1 diabetes is associated with decreased white-matter volume of the brain and diminished cognitive performance in particular in patients with retinopathy (139). Microvascular complications are also thought to play a role in the development of cognitive decline in patients with type 2 diabetes, but studies that have specifically examined this association are scarce. […] Currently there are no established specific treatment measures to prevent or ameliorate cognitive impairments in patients with diabetes.”

“Clinicians should be aware of the fact that cognitive decrements are relatively more common among patients with diabetes. […] it is important to note that cognitive complaints as spontaneously expressed by the patient are often a poor indicator of the severity of cognitive decrements. People with moderate disturbances may express marked complaints, while people with marked disturbances of cognition often do not complain at all. […] Diabetes is generally associated with relatively mild impairments, mainly in attention, memory, information-processing speed, and executive function. Rapid cognitive decline or severe cognitive impairment, especially in persons under the age of 60 is indicative of other underlying pathology. Potentially treatable causes of cognitive decline such as depression should be excluded. People who are depressed often present with complaints of concentration or memory.”

“Insulin resistance increases with age, and the organism maintains normal glucose levels as long as it can produce enough insulin (hyperinsulinemia). Some individuals are less capable than others to mount sustained hyperinsulinemia and will develop glucose intolerance and T2D (23). Other individuals with insulin resistance will maintain normal glucose levels at the expense of hyperinsulinemia but their pancreas will eventually “burn out,” will not be able to sustain hyperinsulinemia, and will develop glucose intolerance and diabetes (23). Others will continue having insulin resistance, may have or not have glucose intolerance, will not develop diabetes, but will have hyperinsulinemia and suffer its consequences. […] Elevations of adiposity result in insulin resistance, causing the pancreas to increase insulin to abnormal levels to sustain normal glucose, and if and when the pancreas can no longer sustain hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance and diabetes will ensue. However, the overlap between these processes is not complete (26). Not all persons with higher adiposity will develop insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia, but most will. Not all persons with insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia will develop glucose intolerance and diabetes, and this depends on genetic and other susceptibility factors that are not completely understood (25, 26). Some adults develop diabetes without going through insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia, but it is thought that most will. The susceptibility to adiposity, that is, the risk of developing the above-described sequence in response to adiposity, varies by gender (4) and particularly by ethnicity. […] Chinese and Southeast Asians are more susceptible than Europeans to developing insulin resistance with comparable increases of adiposity (2).”

There is very strong evidence that adiposity, hyperinsulinemia, and T2D are related to cognitive impairment syndromes, whether AD [Alzheimer’s Disease], VD [Vascular Dementia], or MCI [Mild Cognitive Impairment], and whether the main mechanism is cerebrovascular disease or non-vascular mechanisms. However, more evidence is needed to establish causation. If the relation between these conditions and dementia were to be causal, the public health implications are enormous. […] Diabetes mellitus affects about 20% of adults older than 65 years of age […] two-thirds of the adult population in the United States are overweight or obese, and the short-term trend is for this to worsen. These trends are also being observed worldwide. […] We estimated that in New York City the presence of diabetes or hyperinsulinemia in elderly people could account for 39% of cases of AD (78).”

Psychiatric illnesses in general may be more common among persons with diabetes than in community-based samples, specifically affective and anxiety-related disorders (4). Persons with diabetes are twice as likely to have depression as non-diabetic persons (5). A review of 20 studies on the comorbidity of depression and diabetes found that the average prevalence was about 15%, and ranged from 8.5 to 40%, three times the rate of depressive disorders found in the general adult population of the United States (4–7). The rates of clinically significant depressive symptoms among persons with diabetes are even higher – ranging from 21.8 to 60.0% (8). Recent studies have indicated that persons with type II diabetes, accompanied by either major or minor depression, have significantly higher mortality rates than non-depressed persons with diabetes (9–10) […] A recent meta-analysis reported that patients with type 2 diabetes have a 2-fold increased risk of depression compared to non-diabetic persons (142). The prevalence of major depressive disorder in patients with type 2 diabetes was estimated at 11% and depressive symptoms were observed in 31% of the patients.” (As should be obvious from the above quotes the range of estimates vary a lot here, but the estimates tend to be high – US.)

Depression is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease (Glassman, Maj & Sartorius is a decent book on these topics), and diabetes is also an established risk factor. Might this not lead to a hypothesis that diabetics who are depressed may do particularly poorly, with higher mortality rates and so on? Yes. …and it seems that this is also what people tend to find when they look at this stuff:

Persons with diabetes and depressive symptoms have mortality rates nearly twice as high as persons with diabetes and no depressive symptomatology (9). Persons with co-occurring medical illness and depression also have higher health care utilization leading to higher direct and indirect health care costs (12–13) […]. A meta-analysis of the relationship between depression and diabetes (types I and II) indicated that an increase in the number of depressive symptoms is associated with an increase in the severity and number of diabetic complications, including retinopathy, neuropathy, and nephropathy (15–17). Compared to persons with either diabetes or depression alone, individuals with co-occurring diabetes and depression have shown poorer adherence to dietary and physical activity recommendations, decreased adherence to hypoglycemic medication regimens, higher health care costs, increases in HgbA1c levels, poorer glycemic control, higher rates of retinopathy, and macrovascular complications such as stroke and myocardial infarction, higher ambulatory care use, and use of prescriptions (14, 18–22). Diabetes and depressive symptoms have been shown to have strong independent effects on physical functioning, and individuals experiencing either of these conditions will have worse functional outcomes than those with neither or only one condition (19–20). Nearly all of diabetes management is conducted by the patient and those with co-occurring depression may have poorer outcomes and increased risk of complications due to less adherence to glucose, diet, and medication regimens […] There is some evidence that treatment of depression with antidepressant and/or cognitive-behavioral therapies can improve glycemic control and glucose regulation without any change in the treatment for diabetes (27, 28) […] One important finding is [also] that treatment of depression seems to be able to halt atrophy of the hippocampus and may even lead to stimulation of neurogenesis of hippocampal cells (86).”

Diabetic neuropathy is a severe, disabling chronic condition that affects a significant number of individuals with diabetes. Long considered a disease of the peripheral nervous system, there is mounting evidence of central nervous system involvement. Recent advances in neuroimaging methods have led to a better understanding and refinement of how diabetic neuropathy affects the central nervous system. […] spinal cord atrophy is an early process being present not only in established-DPN [diabetic peripheral neuropathy] but also even in subjects with relatively modest impairments of nerve function (subclinical-DPN) […] findings […] show that the neuropathic process in diabetes is not confined to the peripheral nerve and does involve the spinal cord. Worryingly, this occurs early in the neuropathic process. Even at the early DPN stage, extensive and perhaps even irreversible damage may have occurred. […] it is likely that the insult of diabetes is generalised, concomitantly affecting the PNS and CNS. […] It is noteworthy that a variety of therapeutic interventions specifically targeted at peripheral nerve damage in DPN have thus far been ineffective, and it is possible that this may in part be due to inadequate appreciation of the full extent of CNS involvement in DPN.

Interestingly, if the CNS is also involved in the pathogenesis of (‘human’) diabetic neuropathy it may have some relevance to the complaint that some methods of diabetes-induction in animal models cause (secondary) damage to central structures in animal models – a complaint which I’ve previously made a note of e.g. in the context of my coverage of Horowitz & Samson’s book. The relevance of this depends quite a bit on whether it’s the same central structures that are affected in the animal models and in humans. It probably isn’t. These guys also discuss this stuff in some detail, though I won’t go into too much detail here. Some observations on related topics are however worth including here:

“Several studies examining behavioral learning have shown progressive deficits in diabetic rodents, whereas simple avoidance tasks are preserved. Impaired spatial learning and memory as assessed by the Morris water maze paradigm occur progressively in both the spontaneously diabetic BB/Worrat and STZ-induced diabetic rodents (1, 11, 12, 22, 41, 42). The cognitive components reflected by impaired Morris water maze performances involve problem-solving, enhanced attention and storage, and retrieval of information (43). […] Observations regarding cognition and plasticity in models characterized by hyperglycemia and insulin deficiency (i.e., alloxan or STZ-diabetes, BB/Wor rats, NOD-mice), often referred to as models of type 1 diabetes, are quite consistent. With respect to clinical relevance, it should be noted that the level of glycemia in these models markedly exceeds that observed in patients. Moreover, changes in cognition as observed in these models are much more rapid and severe than in adult patients with type 1 diabetes […], even if the relatively shorter lifespan of rodents is taken into account. […] In my view these models of “type 1 diabetes” may help to understand the pathophysiology of the effects of severe chronic hyperglycemia–hypoinsulinemia on the brain, but mimic the impact of type 1 diabetes on the brain in humans only to a limited extent.”

“Abnormalities in cognition and plasticity have also been noted in the majority of models characterized by insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, and (modest) hyperglycemia (e.g., Zucker fa/fa rat, Diabetic Zucker rat, db/db mouse, GK rat, OLETF rat), often referred to as models of type 2 diabetes. With regard to clinical relevance, it is important to note that although the endocrinological features of these models do mimic certain aspects of type 2 diabetes, the genetic defect that underlies each of them is not the primary defect encountered in humans with type 2 diabetes. Some of the genetic abnormalities that lead to a “diabetic phenotype” may also have a direct impact on the brain. […] some studies using these models report abnormalities in cognition and plasticity, even in the absence of hyperglycemia […] In addition, in the majority of available models insulin resistance and associated metabolic abnormalities develop at a relatively early age. Although this is practical for research purposes it needs to be acknowledged that type 2 diabetes is typically a disease of older age in humans. […] It is therefore still too early to determine the clinical significance of the available models in understanding the impact of type 2 diabetes on the brain. Further efforts into the development of a valid model are warranted.”

[A] key problem in clinical studies is the complexity and multifactorial nature of cerebral complications in relation to diabetes. Metabolic factors in patients (e.g., glucose levels, insulin levels, insulin sensitivity) are strongly interrelated and related to other factors that may affect the brain (e.g., blood pressure, lipids, inflammation, oxidative stress). Derangements in these factors in the periphery and the brain may be dissociated, for example, through the role of the blood–brain barrier, or adaptations of transport across this barrier, or through differences in receptor functions and post-receptor signaling cascades in the periphery and the brain. The different forms of treatments that patients receive add to the complexity. A key contribution of animal studies may be to single out individual components and study them in isolation or in combination with a limited number of other factors in a controlled fashion.

October 9, 2017 Posted by | Books, Cardiology, Diabetes, Epidemiology, Medicine, Neurology, Pharmacology | Leave a comment

Physical chemistry

This is a good book, I really liked it, just as I really liked the other book in the series which I read by the same author, the one about the laws of thermodynamics (blog coverage here). I know much, much more about physics than I do about chemistry and even though some of it was review I learned a lot from this one. Recommended, certainly if you find the quotes below interesting. As usual, I’ve added some observations from the book and some links to topics/people/etc. covered/mentioned in the book below.

Some quotes:

“Physical chemists pay a great deal of attention to the electrons that surround the nucleus of an atom: it is here that the chemical action takes place and the element expresses its chemical personality. […] Quantum mechanics plays a central role in accounting for the arrangement of electrons around the nucleus. The early ‘Bohr model’ of the atom, […] with electrons in orbits encircling the nucleus like miniature planets and widely used in popular depictions of atoms, is wrong in just about every respect—but it is hard to dislodge from the popular imagination. The quantum mechanical description of atoms acknowledges that an electron cannot be ascribed to a particular path around the nucleus, that the planetary ‘orbits’ of Bohr’s theory simply don’t exist, and that some electrons do not circulate around the nucleus at all. […] Physical chemists base their understanding of the electronic structures of atoms on Schrödinger’s model of the hydrogen atom, which was formulated in 1926. […] An atom is often said to be mostly empty space. That is a remnant of Bohr’s model in which a point-like electron circulates around the nucleus; in the Schrödinger model, there is no empty space, just a varying probability of finding the electron at a particular location.”

“No more than two electrons may occupy any one orbital, and if two do occupy that orbital, they must spin in opposite directions. […] this form of the principle [the Pauli exclusion principleUS] […] is adequate for many applications in physical chemistry. At its very simplest, the principle rules out all the electrons of an atom (other than atoms of one-electron hydrogen and two-electron helium) having all their electrons in the 1s-orbital. Lithium, for instance, has three electrons: two occupy the 1s orbital, but the third cannot join them, and must occupy the next higher-energy orbital, the 2s-orbital. With that point in mind, something rather wonderful becomes apparent: the structure of the Periodic Table of the elements unfolds, the principal icon of chemistry. […] The first electron can enter the 1s-orbital, and helium’s (He) second electron can join it. At that point, the orbital is full, and lithium’s (Li) third electron must enter the next higher orbital, the 2s-orbital. The next electron, for beryllium (Be), can join it, but then it too is full. From that point on the next six electrons can enter in succession the three 2p-orbitals. After those six are present (at neon, Ne), all the 2p-orbitals are full and the eleventh electron, for sodium (Na), has to enter the 3s-orbital. […] Similar reasoning accounts for the entire structure of the Table, with elements in the same group all having analogous electron arrangements and each successive row (‘period’) corresponding to the next outermost shell of orbitals.”

“[O]n crossing the [Periodic] Table from left to right, atoms become smaller: even though they have progressively more electrons, the nuclear charge increases too, and draws the clouds in to itself. On descending a group, atoms become larger because in successive periods new outermost shells are started (as in going from lithium to sodium) and each new coating of cloud makes the atom bigger […] the ionization energy [is] the energy needed to remove one or more electrons from the atom. […] The ionization energy more or less follows the trend in atomic radii but in an opposite sense because the closer an electron lies to the positively charged nucleus, the harder it is to remove. Thus, ionization energy increases from left to right across the Table as the atoms become smaller. It decreases down a group because the outermost electron (the one that is most easily removed) is progressively further from the nucleus. […] the electron affinity [is] the energy released when an electron attaches to an atom. […] Electron affinities are highest on the right of the Table […] An ion is an electrically charged atom. That charge comes about either because the neutral atom has lost one or more of its electrons, in which case it is a positively charged cation […] or because it has captured one or more electrons and has become a negatively charged anion. […] Elements on the left of the Periodic Table, with their low ionization energies, are likely to lose electrons and form cations; those on the right, with their high electron affinities, are likely to acquire electrons and form anions. […] ionic bonds […] form primarily between atoms on the left and right of the Periodic Table.”

“Although the Schrödinger equation is too difficult to solve for molecules, powerful computational procedures have been developed by theoretical chemists to arrive at numerical solutions of great accuracy. All the procedures start out by building molecular orbitals from the available atomic orbitals and then setting about finding the best formulations. […] Depictions of electron distributions in molecules are now commonplace and very helpful for understanding the properties of molecules. It is particularly relevant to the development of new pharmacologically active drugs, where electron distributions play a central role […] Drug discovery, the identification of pharmacologically active species by computation rather than in vivo experiment, is an important target of modern computational chemistry.”

Work […] involves moving against an opposing force; heat […] is the transfer of energy that makes use of a temperature difference. […] the internal energy of a system that is isolated from external influences does not change. That is the First Law of thermodynamics. […] A system possesses energy, it does not possess work or heat (even if it is hot). Work and heat are two different modes for the transfer of energy into or out of a system. […] if you know the internal energy of a system, then you can calculate its enthalpy simply by adding to U the product of pressure and volume of the system (H = U + pV). The significance of the enthalpy […] is that a change in its value is equal to the output of energy as heat that can be obtained from the system provided it is kept at constant pressure. For instance, if the enthalpy of a system falls by 100 joules when it undergoes a certain change (such as a chemical reaction), then we know that 100 joules of energy can be extracted as heat from the system, provided the pressure is constant.”

“In the old days of physical chemistry (well into the 20th century), the enthalpy changes were commonly estimated by noting which bonds are broken in the reactants and which are formed to make the products, so A → B might be the bond-breaking step and B → C the new bond-formation step, each with enthalpy changes calculated from knowledge of the strengths of the old and new bonds. That procedure, while often a useful rule of thumb, often gave wildly inaccurate results because bonds are sensitive entities with strengths that depend on the identities and locations of the other atoms present in molecules. Computation now plays a central role: it is now routine to be able to calculate the difference in energy between the products and reactants, especially if the molecules are isolated as a gas, and that difference easily converted to a change of enthalpy. […] Enthalpy changes are very important for a rational discussion of changes in physical state (vaporization and freezing, for instance) […] If we know the enthalpy change taking place during a reaction, then provided the process takes place at constant pressure we know how much energy is released as heat into the surroundings. If we divide that heat transfer by the temperature, then we get the associated entropy change in the surroundings. […] provided the pressure and temperature are constant, a spontaneous change corresponds to a decrease in Gibbs energy. […] the chemical potential can be thought of as the Gibbs energy possessed by a standard-size block of sample. (More precisely, for a pure substance the chemical potential is the molar Gibbs energy, the Gibbs energy per mole of atoms or molecules.)”

“There are two kinds of work. One kind is the work of expansion that occurs when a reaction generates a gas and pushes back the atmosphere (perhaps by pressing out a piston). That type of work is called ‘expansion work’. However, a chemical reaction might do work other than by pushing out a piston or pushing back the atmosphere. For instance, it might do work by driving electrons through an electric circuit connected to a motor. This type of work is called ‘non-expansion work’. […] a change in the Gibbs energy of a system at constant temperature and pressure is equal to the maximum non-expansion work that can be done by the reaction. […] the link of thermodynamics with biology is that one chemical reaction might do the non-expansion work of building a protein from amino acids. Thus, a knowledge of the Gibbs energies changes accompanying metabolic processes is very important in bioenergetics, and much more important than knowing the enthalpy changes alone (which merely indicate a reaction’s ability to keep us warm).”

“[T]he probability that a molecule will be found in a state of particular energy falls off rapidly with increasing energy, so most molecules will be found in states of low energy and very few will be found in states of high energy. […] If the temperature is low, then the distribution declines so rapidly that only the very lowest levels are significantly populated. If the temperature is high, then the distribution falls off very slowly with increasing energy, and many high-energy states are populated. If the temperature is zero, the distribution has all the molecules in the ground state. If the temperature is infinite, all available states are equally populated. […] temperature […] is the single, universal parameter that determines the most probable distribution of molecules over the available states.”

“Mixing adds disorder and increases the entropy of the system and therefore lowers the Gibbs energy […] In the absence of mixing, a reaction goes to completion; when mixing of reactants and products is taken into account, equilibrium is reached when both are present […] Statistical thermodynamics, through the Boltzmann distribution and its dependence on temperature, allows physical chemists to understand why in some cases the equilibrium shifts towards reactants (which is usually unwanted) or towards products (which is normally wanted) as the temperature is raised. A rule of thumb […] is provided by a principle formulated by Henri Le Chatelier […] that a system at equilibrium responds to a disturbance by tending to oppose its effect. Thus, if a reaction releases energy as heat (is ‘exothermic’), then raising the temperature will oppose the formation of more products; if the reaction absorbs energy as heat (is ‘endothermic’), then raising the temperature will encourage the formation of more product.”

“Model building pervades physical chemistry […] some hold that the whole of science is based on building models of physical reality; much of physical chemistry certainly is.”

“For reasonably light molecules (such as the major constituents of air, N2 and O2) at room temperature, the molecules are whizzing around at an average speed of about 500 m/s (about 1000 mph). That speed is consistent with what we know about the propagation of sound, the speed of which is about 340 m/s through air: for sound to propagate, molecules must adjust their position to give a wave of undulating pressure, so the rate at which they do so must be comparable to their average speeds. […] a typical N2 or O2 molecule in air makes a collision every nanosecond and travels about 1000 molecular diameters between collisions. To put this scale into perspective: if a molecule is thought of as being the size of a tennis ball, then it travels about the length of a tennis court between collisions. Each molecule makes about a billion collisions a second.”

“X-ray diffraction makes use of the fact that electromagnetic radiation (which includes X-rays) consists of waves that can interfere with one another and give rise to regions of enhanced and diminished intensity. This so-called ‘diffraction pattern’ is characteristic of the object in the path of the rays, and mathematical procedures can be used to interpret the pattern in terms of the object’s structure. Diffraction occurs when the wavelength of the radiation is comparable to the dimensions of the object. X-rays have wavelengths comparable to the separation of atoms in solids, so are ideal for investigating their arrangement.”

“For most liquids the sample contracts when it freezes, so […] the temperature does not need to be lowered so much for freezing to occur. That is, the application of pressure raises the freezing point. Water, as in most things, is anomalous, and ice is less dense than liquid water, so water expands when it freezes […] when two gases are allowed to occupy the same container they invariably mix and each spreads uniformly through it. […] the quantity of gas that dissolves in any liquid is proportional to the pressure of the gas. […] When the temperature of [a] liquid is raised, it is easier for a dissolved molecule to gather sufficient energy to escape back up into the gas; the rate of impacts from the gas is largely unchanged. The outcome is a lowering of the concentration of dissolved gas at equilibrium. Thus, gases appear to be less soluble in hot water than in cold. […] the presence of dissolved substances affects the properties of solutions. For instance, the everyday experience of spreading salt on roads to hinder the formation of ice makes use of the lowering of freezing point of water when a salt is present. […] the boiling point is raised by the presence of a dissolved substance [whereas] the freezing point […] is lowered by the presence of a solute.”

“When a liquid and its vapour are present in a closed container the vapour exerts a characteristic pressure (when the escape of molecules from the liquid matches the rate at which they splash back down into it […][)] This characteristic pressure depends on the temperature and is called the ‘vapour pressure’ of the liquid. When a solute is present, the vapour pressure at a given temperature is lower than that of the pure liquid […] The extent of lowering is summarized by yet another limiting law of physical chemistry, ‘Raoult’s law’ [which] states that the vapour pressure of a solvent or of a component of a liquid mixture is proportional to the proportion of solvent or liquid molecules present. […] Osmosis [is] the tendency of solvent molecules to flow from the pure solvent to a solution separated from it by a [semi-]permeable membrane […] The entropy when a solute is present in a solvent is higher than when the solute is absent, so an increase in entropy, and therefore a spontaneous process, is achieved when solvent flows through the membrane from the pure liquid into the solution. The tendency for this flow to occur can be overcome by applying pressure to the solution, and the minimum pressure needed to overcome the tendency to flow is called the ‘osmotic pressure’. If one solution is put into contact with another through a semipermeable membrane, then there will be no net flow if they exert the same osmotic pressures and are ‘isotonic’.”

“Broadly speaking, the reaction quotient [‘Q’] is the ratio of concentrations, with product concentrations divided by reactant concentrations. It takes into account how the mingling of the reactants and products affects the total Gibbs energy of the mixture. The value of Q that corresponds to the minimum in the Gibbs energy […] is called the equilibrium constant and denoted K. The equilibrium constant, which is characteristic of a given reaction and depends on the temperature, is central to many discussions in chemistry. When K is large (1000, say), we can be reasonably confident that the equilibrium mixture will be rich in products; if K is small (0.001, say), then there will be hardly any products present at equilibrium and we should perhaps look for another way of making them. If K is close to 1, then both reactants and products will be abundant at equilibrium and will need to be separated. […] Equilibrium constants vary with temperature but not […] with pressure. […] van’t Hoff’s equation implies that if the reaction is strongly exothermic (releases a lot of energy as heat when it takes place), then the equilibrium constant decreases sharply as the temperature is raised. The opposite is true if the reaction is strongly endothermic (absorbs a lot of energy as heat). […] Typically it is found that the rate of a reaction [how fast it progresses] decreases as it approaches equilibrium. […] Most reactions go faster when the temperature is raised. […] reactions with high activation energies proceed slowly at low temperatures but respond sharply to changes of temperature. […] The surface area exposed by a catalyst is important for its function, for it is normally the case that the greater that area, the more effective is the catalyst.”

Links:

John Dalton.
Atomic orbital.
Electron configuration.
S,p,d,f orbitals.
Computational chemistry.
Atomic radius.
Covalent bond.
Gilbert Lewis.
Valence bond theory.
Molecular orbital theory.
Orbital hybridisation.
Bonding and antibonding orbitals.
Schrödinger equation.
Density functional theory.
Chemical thermodynamics.
Laws of thermodynamics/Zeroth law/First law/Second law/Third Law.
Conservation of energy.
Thermochemistry.
Bioenergetics.
Spontaneous processes.
Entropy.
Rudolf Clausius.
Chemical equilibrium.
Heat capacity.
Compressibility.
Statistical thermodynamics/statistical mechanics.
Boltzmann distribution.
State of matter/gas/liquid/solid.
Perfect gas/Ideal gas law.
Robert Boyle/Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac/Jacques Charles/Amedeo Avogadro.
Equation of state.
Kinetic theory of gases.
Van der Waals equation of state.
Maxwell–Boltzmann distribution.
Thermal conductivity.
Viscosity.
Nuclear magnetic resonance.
Debye–Hückel equation.
Ionic solids.
Catalysis.
Supercritical fluid.
Liquid crystal.
Graphene.
Benoît Paul Émile Clapeyron.
Phase (matter)/phase diagram/Gibbs’ phase rule.
Ideal solution/regular solution.
Henry’s law.
Chemical kinetics.
Electrochemistry.
Rate equation/First order reactions/Second order reactions.
Rate-determining step.
Arrhenius equation.
Collision theory.
Diffusion-controlled and activation-controlled reactions.
Transition state theory.
Photochemistry/fluorescence/phosphorescence/photoexcitation.
Photosynthesis.
Redox reactions.
Electrochemical cell.
Fuel cell.
Reaction dynamics.
Spectroscopy/emission spectroscopy/absorption spectroscopy/Raman spectroscopy.
Raman effect.
Magnetic resonance imaging.
Fourier-transform spectroscopy.
Electron paramagnetic resonance.
Mass spectrum.
Electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis.
Scanning tunneling microscope.
Chemisorption/physisorption.

October 5, 2017 Posted by | Biology, Books, Chemistry, Pharmacology, Physics | Leave a comment

National EM Board Review Course: Toxicology

Some links:

Flumazenil.
Naloxone.
Alcoholic Ketoacidosis.
Gastrointestinal decontamination in the acutely poisoned patient.
Chelation in Metal Intoxication.
Mudpiles – causes of high anion-gap metabolic acidosis.
Toxidromes.
Whole-bowel irrigation: Background, indications, contraindications…
Organophosphate toxicity.
Withdrawal syndromes.
Acetaminophen toxicity.
Alcohol withdrawal.
Wernicke syndrome.
Methanol toxicity.
Ethylene glycol toxicity.
Sympathomimetic toxicity.
Disulfiram toxicity.
Arsenic toxicity.
Barbiturate toxicity.
Beta-blocker toxicity.
Calcium channel blocker toxicity.
Carbon monoxide toxicity.
Caustic ingestions.
Clonidine toxicity.
Cyanide toxicity.
Digitalis toxicity.
Gamma-hydroxybutyrate toxicity.
Hydrocarbon toxicity.
CDC Facts About Hydrogen Fluoride (Hydrofluoric Acid).
Hydrogen Sulfide Toxicity.
Isoniazid toxicity.
Iron toxicity.
Lead toxicity.
Lithium toxicity.
Mercury toxicity.
Methemoglobinemia.
Mushroom toxicity.
Argyria.
Gyromitra mushroom toxicity.
Neuroleptic agent toxicity.
Neuroleptic malignant syndrome.
Oral hypoglycemic agent toxicity.
PCP toxicity.
Phenytoin toxicity.
Rodenticide toxicity.
Salicylate toxicity.
Serotonin syndrome.
TCA toxicity.

September 29, 2017 Posted by | Lectures, Medicine, Pharmacology, Psychiatry | Leave a comment

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and Cardiovascular Disease

“Despite the known higher risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), the pathophysiology underlying the relationship between cardiovascular events, CVD risk factors, and T1DM is not well understood. […] The present review will focus on the importance of CVD in patients with T1DM. We will summarize recent observations of potential differences in the pathophysiology of T1DM compared with T2DM, particularly with regard to atherosclerosis. We will explore the implications of these concepts for treatment of CVD risk factors in patients with T1DM. […] The statement will identify gaps in knowledge about T1DM and CVD and will conclude with a summary of areas in which research is needed.”

The above quote is from this paper: Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and Cardiovascular Disease: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association and American Diabetes Association.

I originally intended to cover this one in one of my regular diabetes posts, but I decided in the end that there was simply too much stuff to cover here for it to make sense not to devote an entire post to it. I have quoted extensively from the paper/statement below and I also decided to bold a few of the observations I found particularly important/noteworthy(/worth pointing out to people reading along?).

“T1DM has strong human leukocyte antigen associations to the DQA, DQB, and DRB alleles (2). One or more autoantibodies, including islet cell, insulin, glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65), zinc transporter 8 (3), and tyrosine phosphatase IA-2β and IA-2β antibodies, can be detected in 85–90% of individuals on presentation. The rate of β-cell destruction varies, generally occurring more rapidly at younger ages. However, T1DM can also present in adults, some of whom can have enough residual β-cell function to avoid dependence on insulin until many years later. When autoantibodies are present, this is referred to as latent autoimmune diabetes of adulthood. Infrequently, T1DM can present without evidence of autoimmunity but with intermittent episodes of ketoacidosis; between episodes, the need for insulin treatment can come and go. This type of DM, called idiopathic diabetes (1) or T1DM type B, occurs more often in those of African and Asian ancestry (4). Because of the increasing prevalence of obesity in the United States, there are also obese individuals with T1DM, particularly children. Evidence of insulin resistance (such as acanthosis nigricans); fasting insulin, glucose, and C-peptide levels; and the presence of islet cell, insulin, glutamic acid decarboxylase, and phosphatase autoantibodies can help differentiate between T1DM and T2DM, although both insulin resistance and insulin insufficiency can be present in the same patient (5), and rarely, T2DM can present at an advanced stage with low C-peptide levels and minimal islet cell function.”

Overall, CVD events are more common and occur earlier in patients with T1DM than in nondiabetic populations; women with T1DM are more likely to have a CVD event than are healthy women. CVD prevalence rates in T1DM vary substantially based on duration of DM, age of cohort, and sex, as well as possibly by race/ethnicity (8,11,12). The Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications (EDC) study demonstrated that the incidence of major coronary artery disease (CAD) events in young adults (aged 28–38 years) with T1DM was 0.98% per year and surpassed 3% per year after age 55 years, which makes it the leading cause of death in that population (13). By contrast, incident first CVD in the nondiabetic population ranges from 0.1% in 35- to 44-year-olds to 7.4% in adults aged 85–94 years (14). An increased risk of CVD has been reported in other studies, with the age-adjusted relative risk (RR) for CVD in T1DM being ≈10 times that of the general population (1517). One of the most robust analyses of CVD risk in this disease derives from the large UK General Practice Research Database (GPRD), comprising data from >7,400 patients with T1DM with a mean ± SD age of 33 ± 14.5 years and a mean DM duration of 15 ± 12 years (8). CVD events in the UK GPRD study occurred on average 10 to 15 years earlier than in matched nondiabetic control subjects.”

“When types of CVD are reported separately, CHD [coronary heart disease] predominates […] The published cumulative incidence of CHD ranges between 2.1% (18) and 19% (19), with most studies reporting cumulative incidences of ≈15% over ≈15 years of follow-up (2022). […] Although stroke is less common than CHD in T1DM, it is another important CVD end point. Reported incidence rates vary but are relatively low. […] the Wisconsin Epidemiologic Study of Diabetic Retinopathy (WESDR) reported an incidence rate of 5.9% over 20 years (≈0.3%) (21); and the European Diabetes (EURODIAB) Study reported a 0.74% incidence of cerebrovascular disease per year (18). These incidence rates are for the most part higher than those reported in the general population […] PAD [peripheral artery disease] is another important vascular complication of T1DM […] The rate of nontraumatic amputation in T1DM is high, occurring at 0.4–7.2% per year (28). By 65 years of age, the cumulative probability of lower-extremity amputation in a Swedish administrative database was 11% for women with T1DM and 20.7% for men (10). In this Swedish population, the rate of lower-extremity amputation among those with T1DM was nearly 86-fold that of the general population.

“Abnormal vascular findings associated with atherosclerosis are also seen in patients with T1DM. Coronary artery calcification (CAC) burden, an accepted noninvasive assessment of atherosclerosis and a predictor of CVD events in the general population, is greater in people with T1DM than in nondiabetic healthy control subjects […] With regard to subclinical carotid disease, both carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and plaque are increased in children, adolescents, and adults with T1DM […] compared with age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects […] Endothelial function is altered even at a very early stage of T1DM […] Taken together, these data suggest that preclinical CVD can be seen more frequently and to a greater extent in patients with T1DM, even at an early age. Some data suggest that its presence may portend CVD events; however, how these subclinical markers function as end points is not clear.”

“Neuropathy in T1DM can lead to abnormalities in the response of the coronary vasculature to sympathetic stimulation, which may manifest clinically as resting tachycardia or bradycardia, exercise intolerance, orthostatic hypotension, loss of the nocturnal decline in BP, or silent myocardial ischemia on cardiac testing. These abnormalities can lead to delayed presentation of CVD. An early indicator of cardiac autonomic neuropathy is reduced heart rate variability […] Estimates of the prevalence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy in T1DM vary widely […] Cardiac neuropathy may affect as many as ≈40% of individuals with T1DM (45).”

CVD events occur much earlier in patients with T1DM than in the general population, often after 2 decades of T1DM, which in some patients may be by age 30 years. Thus, in the EDC study, CVD was the leading cause of death in T1DM patients after 20 years of disease duration, at rates of >3% per year (13). Rates of CVD this high fall into the National Cholesterol Education Program’s high-risk category and merit intensive CVD prevention efforts (48). […] CVD events are not generally expected to occur during childhood, even in the setting of T1DM; however, the atherosclerotic process begins during childhood. Children and adolescents with T1DM have subclinical CVD abnormalities even within the first decade of DM diagnosis according to a number of different methodologies”.

Rates of CVD are lower in premenopausal women than in men […much lower: “Cardiovascular disease develops 7 to 10 years later in women than in men” – US]. In T1DM, these differences are erased. In the United Kingdom, CVD affects men and women with T1DM equally at <40 years of age (23), although after age 40 years, men are affected more than women (51). Similar findings on CVD mortality rates were reported in a large Norwegian T1DM cohort study (52) and in the Allegheny County (PA) T1DM Registry (13), which reported the relative impact of CVD compared with the general population was much higher for women than for men (standardized mortality ratio [SMR] 13.2 versus 5.0 for total mortality and 24.7 versus 8.8 for CVD mortality, women versus men). […] Overall, T1DM appears to eliminate most of the female sex protection seen in the nondiabetic population.”

“The data on atherosclerosis in T1DM are limited. A small angiographic study compared 32 individuals with T1DM to 31 nondiabetic patients matched for age and symptoms (71). That study found atherosclerosis in the setting of T1DM was characterized by more severe (tighter) stenoses, more extensive involvement (multiple vessels), and more distal coronary findings than in patients without DM. A quantitative coronary angiographic study in T1DM suggested more severe, distal disease and an overall increased burden compared with nondiabetic patients (up to fourfold higher) (72).”

“In the general population, inflammation is a central pathological process of atherosclerosis (79). Limited pathology data suggest that inflammation is more prominent in patients with DM than in nondiabetic control subjects (70), and those with T1DM in particular are affected. […] Knowledge of the clinical role of inflammatory markers in T1DM and CVD prediction and management is in its infancy, but early data suggest a relationship with preclinical atherosclerosis. […] Studies showed C-reactive protein is elevated within the first year of diagnosis of T1DM (80), and interleukin-6 and fibrinogen levels are high in individuals with an average disease duration of 2 years (81), independent of adiposity and glycemia (82). Other inflammatory markers such as soluble interleukin-2 receptor (83) and CD40 ligand (84,85) are higher in patients with T1DM than in nondiabetic subjects. Inflammation is evident in youth, even soon after the diagnosis of T1DM. […] The mechanisms by which inflammation operates in T1DM are likely multiple but may include hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia, excess adiposity or altered body fat distribution, thrombosis, and adipokines. Several recent studies have demonstrated a relationship between acute hypoglycemia and indexes of systemic inflammation […] These studies suggest that acute hypoglycemia in T1DM produces complex vascular effects involved in the activation of proinflammatory, prothrombotic, and proatherogenic mechanisms. […] Fibrinogen, a prothrombotic acute phase reactant, is increased in T1DM and is associated with premature CVD (109), and it may be important in vessel thrombosis at later stages of CVD.”

“Genetic polymorphisms appear to influence the progression and prognosis of CVD in T1DM […] Like fibrinogen, haptoglobin is an acute phase protein that inhibits hemoglobin-induced oxidative tissue damage by binding to free hemoglobin (110). […] In humans, there are 2 classes of alleles at the haptoglobin locus, giving rise to 3 possible genotypes: haptoglobin 1-1, haptoglobin 2-1, and haptoglobin 2-2. […] In T1DM, there is an independent twofold increased incidence of CAD in haptoglobin 2-2 carriers compared with those with the haptoglobin 1-1 genotype (117); the 2-1 genotype is associated with an intermediate effect of increased CVD risk. More recently, an independent association was reported in T1DM between the haptoglobin 2-2 genotype and early progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) (118). In the CACTI study group, the presence of the haptoglobin 2-2 genotype also doubled the risk of CAC [coronary artery calcification] in patients free from CAC at baseline, after adjustment for traditional CVD risk factors (119). […] At present, genetic testing for polymorphisms in T1DM [however] has no clear clinical utility in CVD prediction or management.”

“Dysglycemia is often conceived of as a vasculopathic process. Preclinical atherosclerosis and epidemiological studies generally support this relationship. Clinical trial data from the DCCT supplied definitive findings strongly in favor of beneficial effects of better glycemic control on CVD outcomes. Glycemia is associated with preclinical atherosclerosis in studies that include tests of endothelial function, arterial stiffness, cIMT, autonomic neuropathy, and left ventricular (LV) function in T1DM […] LV mass and function improve with better glycemic control (126,135,136). Epidemiological evidence generally supports the relationship between hyperglycemia and clinical CHD events in T1DM. […] A large Swedish database review recently reported a reasonably strong association between HbA1c and CAD in T1DM (HR, 1.3 per 1% HbA1c increase) (141). […] findings support the recommendation that early optimal glycemic control in T1DM will have long-term benefits for CVD reduction.”

“Obesity is a known independent risk factor for CVD in nondiabetic populations, but the impact of obesity in T1DM has not been fully established. Traditionally, T1DM was a condition of lean individuals, yet the prevalence of overweight and obesity in T1DM has increased significantly […] This is related to epidemiological shifts in the population overall, tighter glucose control leading to less glucosuria, more frequent/greater caloric intake to fend off real and perceived hypoglycemia, and the specific effects of intensive DM therapy, which has been shown to increase the prevalence of obesity (152). Indeed, several clinical trials, including the DCCT, demonstrate that intensive insulin therapy can lead to excessive weight gain in a subset of patients with T1DM (152). […] No systematic evaluation has been conducted to assess whether improving insulin sensitization lowers rates of CVD. Ironically, the better glycemic control associated with insulin therapy may lead to weight gain, with a superimposed insulin resistance, which may be approached by giving higher doses of insulin. However, some evidence from the EDC study suggests that weight gain in the presence of improved glycemic control is associated with an improved CVD risk profile (162). […] Although T1DM is characteristically a disease of absolute insulin deficiency (154), insulin resistance appears to contribute to CHD risk in patients with T1DM. For example, having a family history of T2DM, which suggests a genetic predisposition for insulin resistance, has been associated with an increased CVD risk in patients with T1DM (155).”

“In general, the lipid levels of adults with well-controlled T1DM are similar to those of individuals without DM […] Worse glycemic control, higher weight (164), and more insulin resistance as measured by euglycemic clamp (165) are associated with a more atherogenic cholesterol distribution in men and women with T1DM […] Studies in pediatric and young adult populations suggest higher lipid values than in youth without T1DM, with glycemic control being a significant contributor (148). […] Most studies show that as is true for the general population, dyslipidemia is a risk factor for CVD in T1DM. Qualitative differences in lipid and lipoprotein fractions are being investigated to determine whether abnormal lipid function may contribute to this. The HDL-C fraction has been of particular interest because the metabolism of HDL-C in T1DM may be altered because of abnormal lipoprotein lipase and hepatic lipase activities related to exogenously administered insulin […] Additionally, as noted earlier, the less efficient handling of heme by the haptoglobin 2-2 genotype in patients with T1DM leaves these complexes less capable of being removed by macrophages, which allows them to associate with HDL, which renders it less functional (116). […] Conventionally, pharmacotherapy is used more aggressively for patients with T1DM and lipid disorders than for nondiabetic patients; however, recommendations for treatment are mostly extrapolated from interventional trials in adults with T2DM, in which rates of CVD events are equivalent to those in secondary prevention populations. Whether this is appropriate for T1DM is not clear […] Awareness of CVD risk and screening for hypercholesterolemia in T1DM have increased over time, yet recent data indicate that control is suboptimal, particularly in younger patients who have not yet developed long-term complications and might therefore benefit from prevention efforts (173). Adults with T1DM who have abnormal lipids and additional risk factors for CVD (e.g., hypertension, obesity, or smoking) who have not developed CVD should be treated with statins. Adults with CVD and T1DM should also be treated with statins, regardless of whether they have additional risk factors.”

“Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is a complication of T1DM that is strongly linked to CVD. DKD can present as microalbuminuria or macroalbuminuria, impaired GFR, or both. These represent separate but complementary manifestations of DKD and are often, but not necessarily, sequential in their presentation. […] the risk of all-cause mortality increased with the severity of DKD, from microalbuminuria to macroalbuminuria to ESRD. […] Microalbuminuria is likely an indicator of diffuse vascular injury. […] Microalbuminuria is highly correlated with CVD (49,180182). In the Steno Diabetes Center (Gentofte, Denmark) cohort, T1DM patients with isolated microalbuminuria had a 4.2-fold increased risk of CVD (49,180). In the EDC study, microalbuminuria was associated with mortality risk, with an SMR of 6.4. In the FinnDiane study, mortality risk was also increased with microalbuminuria (SMR, 2.8). […] A recent review summarized these data. In patients with T1DM and microalbuminuria, there was an RR of all-cause mortality of 1.8 (95% CI, 1.5–2.1) that was unaffected by adjustment for confounders (183). Similar RRs were found for mortality from CVD (1.9; 95% CI, 1.3–2.9), CHD (2.1; 95% CI, 1.2–3.5), and aggregate CVD mortality (2.0; 95% CI, 1.5–2.6).”

“Macroalbuminuria represents more substantial kidney damage and is also associated with CVD. Mechanisms may be more closely related to functional consequences of kidney disease, such as higher LDL-C and lower HDL-C. Prospective data from Finland indicate the RR for CVD is ≈10 times greater in patients with macroalbuminuria than in those without macroalbuminuria (184). Historically, in the [Danish] Steno cohort, patients with T1DM and macroalbuminuria had a 37-fold increased risk of CVD mortality compared with the general population (49,180); however, a more recent report from EURODIAB suggests a much lower RR (8.7; 95% CI, 4.03–19.0) (185). […] In general, impaired GFR is a risk factor for CVD, independent of albuminuria […] ESRD [end-stage renal disease, US], the extreme form of impaired GFR, is associated with the greatest risk of CVD of all varieties of DKD. In the EDC study, ESRD was associated with an SMR for total mortality of 29.8, whereas in the FinnDiane study, it was 18.3. It is now clear that GFR loss and the development of eGFR <60 mL · min−1 · 1.73 m−2 can occur without previous manifestation of microalbuminuria or macroalbuminuria (177,178). In T1DM, the precise incidence, pathological basis, and prognosis of this phenotype remain incompletely described.”

“Prevention of DKD remains challenging. Although microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria are attractive therapeutic targets for CVD prevention, there are no specific interventions directed at the kidney that prevent DKD. Inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is an attractive option but has not been demonstrated to prevent DKD before it is clinically apparent. […] In contrast to prevention efforts, treatment of DKD with agents that inhibit the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is effective. […] angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors reduce the progression of DKD and death in T1DM (200). Thus, once DKD develops, treatment is recommended to prevent progression and to reduce or minimize other CVD risk factors, which has a positive effect on CVD risk. All patients with T1DM and hypertension or albuminuria should be treated with an ACE inhibitor. If an ACE inhibitor is not tolerated, an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) is likely to have similar efficacy, although this has not been studied specifically in patients with T1DM. Optimal dosing for ACE inhibitors or ARBs in the setting of DKD is not well defined; titration may be guided by BP, albuminuria, serum potassium, and creatinine. Combination therapy of ACE and ARB blockade cannot be specifically recommended at this time.”

“Hypertension is more common in patients with T1DM and is a powerful risk factor for CVD, regardless of whether an individual has DKD. In the CACTI [Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes] study, hypertension was much more common in patients with T1DM than in age- and sex-matched control subjects (43% versus 15%, P < 0.001); in fact, only 42% of all T1DM patients met the Joint National Commission 7 goal (BP <130/80 mmHg) (201). Hypertension also affects youth with T1DM. The SEARCH trial of youth aged 3–17 years with T1DM (n = 3,691) found the prevalence of elevated BP was 5.9% […] Abnormalities in BP can stem from DKD or obesity. Hyperglycemia may also contribute to hypertension over the long term. In the DCCT/EDIC cohort, higher HbA1c was strongly associated with increased risk of hypertension, and intensive DM therapy reduced the long-term risk of hypertension by 24% (203). […] There are few published trials about the ideal pharmacotherapeutic agent(s) for hypertension in T1DM.”

“Smoking is a major risk factor for CVD, particularly PAD (213); however, there is little information on the prevalence or effects of smoking in T1DM. […] The added CVD risk of smoking may be particularly important in patients with DM, who are already vulnerable. In patients with T1DM, cigarette smoking [has been shown to increase] the risk of DM nephropathy, retinopathy, and neuropathy (214,215) […] Smoking increases CVD risk factors in T1DM via deterioration in glucose metabolism, lipids, and endothelial function (216). Unfortunately, smoking cessation can result in weight gain, which may deter smokers with DM from quitting (217). […] Smoking cessation should be strongly recommended to all patients with T1DM as part of an overall strategy to lower CVD, in particular PAD.”

“CVD risk factors are more common in children with T1DM than in the general pediatric population (218). Population-based studies estimate that 14–45% of children with T1DM have ≥2 CVD risk factors (219221). As with nondiabetic children, the prevalence of CVD risk factors increases with age (221). […] The American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Heart Association, and the ADA recognize patients with DM, and particularly T1DM, as being in a higher-risk group who should receive more aggressive risk factor screening and treatment than nondiabetic children […] The available data suggest many children and adolescents with T1DM do not receive the recommended treatment for their dyslipidemia and hypertension (220,222).”

“There are no CVD risk-prediction algorithms for patients with T1DM in widespread use. […] Use of the Framingham Heart Study and UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) algorithms in the EDC study population did not provide good predictive results, which suggests that neither general or T2DM risk algorithms are sufficient for risk prediction in T1DM (235). On the basis of these findings, a model has been developed with the use of EDC cohort data (236) that incorporates measures outside the Framingham construct (white blood cell count, albuminuria, DM duration). Although this algorithm was validated in the EURODIAB Study cohort (237), it has not been widely adopted, and diagnostic and therapeutic decisions are often based on global CVD risk-estimation methods (i.e., Framingham risk score or T2DM-specific UKPDS risk engine [http://www.dtu.ox.ac.uk/riskengine/index.php]). Other options for CVD risk prediction in patients with T1DM include the ADA risk-assessment tool (http://main.diabetes.org/dorg/mha/main_en_US.html?loc=dorg-mha) and the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) risk predictor (http://www.aricnews.net/riskcalc/html/RC1.html), but again, accuracy for T1DM is not clear.”

September 25, 2017 Posted by | Cardiology, Diabetes, Epidemiology, Genetics, Medicine, Nephrology, Neurology, Pharmacology, Studies | Leave a comment

Ophthalmology – National EM Board Review Course

The lecture covers a lot of different stuff. Some links:

Blepharitis.
Dacryocystitis.
Dacryoadenitis.
Chalazion.
Orbital Cellulitis.
Cranial Nerves III, IV, and VI: The Oculomotor System.
Argyll Robertson pupil.
Marcus Gunn pupil.
Horner syndrome.
Third nerve palsy.
Homonymous hemianopsia.
Central Retinal Artery Occlusion.
Central Retinal Vein Occlusion.
Optic Neuritis.
Retinal detachment.
Temporal Arteritis.
Conjunctivitis.
Epidemic Keratoconjunctivitis (EKC).
Uveitis.
Hypopyon.
Keratitis.
Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus.
Subconjunctival Hemorrhage.
Corneal Abrasion.
Corneal Laceration.
Globe Rupture.
Acute Angle-Closure Glaucoma.
Hyphema.
Endophthalmitis.
Retrobulbar hemorrhage.

September 15, 2017 Posted by | Lectures, Medicine, Ophthalmology, Pharmacology | Leave a comment

Depression and Heart Disease (II)

Below I have added some more observations from the book, which I gave four stars on goodreads.

“A meta-analysis of twin (and family) studies estimated the heritability of adult MDD around 40% [16] and this estimate is strikingly stable across different countries [17, 18]. If measurement error due to unreliability is taken into account by analysing MDD assessed on two occasions, heritability estimates increase to 66% [19]. Twin studies in children further show that there is already a large genetic contribution to depressive symptoms in youth, with heritability estimates varying between 50% and 80% [20–22]. […] Cardiovascular research in twin samples has suggested a clear-cut genetic contribution to hypertension (h2 = 61%) [30], fatal stroke (h2 = 32%) [31] and CAD (h2 = 57% in males and 38% in females) [32]. […] A very important, and perhaps underestimated, source of pleiotropy in the association of MDD and CAD are the major behavioural risk factors for CAD: smoking and physical inactivity. These factors are sometimes considered ‘environmental’, but twin studies have shown that such behaviours have a strong genetic component [33–35]. Heritability estimates for [many] established risk factors [for CAD – e.g. BMI, smoking, physical inactivity – US] are 50% or higher in most adult twin samples and these estimates remain remarkably similar across the adult life span [41–43].”

“The crucial question is whether the genetic factors underlying MDD also play a role in CAD and CAD risk factors. To test for an overlap in the genetic factors, a bivariate extension of the structural equation model for twin data can be used [57]. […] If the depressive symptoms in a twin predict the IL-6 level in his/her co-twin, this can only be explained by an underlying factor that affects both depression and IL-6 levels and is shared by members of a family. If the prediction is much stronger in MZ than in DZ twins, this signals that the underlying factor is their shared genetic make-up, rather than their shared (family) environment. […] It is important to note clearly here that genetic correlations do not prove the existence of pleiotropy, because genes that influence MDD may, through causal effects of MDD on CAD risk, also become ‘CAD genes’. The absence of a genetic correlation, however, can be used to falsify the existence of genetic pleiotropy. For instance, the hypothesis that genetic pleiotropy explains part of the association between depressive symptoms and IL-6 requires the genetic correlation between these traits to be significantly different from zero. [Furthermore,] the genetic correlation should have a positive value. A negative genetic correlation would signal that genes that increase the risk for depression decrease the risk for higher IL-6 levels, which would go against the genetic pleiotropy hypothesis. […] Su et al. [26] […] tested pleiotropy as a possible source of the association of depressive symptoms with Il-6 in 188 twin pairs of the Vietnam Era Twin (VET) Registry. The genetic correlation between depressive symptoms and IL-6 was found to be positive and significant (RA = 0.22, p = 0.046)”

“For the association between MDD and physical inactivity, the dominant hypothesis has not been that MDD causes a reduction in regular exercise, but instead that regular exercise may act as a protective factor against mood disorders. […] we used the twin method to perform a rigorous test of this popular hypothesis [on] 8558 twins and their family members using their longitudinal data across 2-, 4-, 7-, 9- and 11-year follow-up periods. In spite of sufficient statistical power, we found only the genetic correlation to be significant (ranging between *0.16 and *0.44 for different symptom scales and different time-lags). The environmental correlations were essentially zero. This means that the environmental factors that cause a person to take up exercise do not cause lower anxiety or depressive symptoms in that person, currently or at any future time point. In contrast, the genetic factors that cause a person to take up exercise also cause lower anxiety or depressive symptoms in that person, at the present and all future time points. This pattern of results falsifies the causal hypothesis and leaves genetic pleiotropy as the most likely source for the association between exercise and lower levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms in the population at large. […] Taken together, [the] studies support the idea that genetic pleiotropy may be a factor contributing to the increased risk for CAD in subjects suffering from MDD or reporting high counts of depressive symptoms. The absence of environmental correlations in the presence of significant genetic correlations for a number of the CAD risk factors (CFR, cholesterol, inflammation and regular exercise) suggests that pleiotropy is the sole reason for the association between MDD and these CAD risk factors, whereas for other CAD risk factors (e.g. smoking) and CAD incidence itself, pleiotropy may coexist with causal effects.”

“By far the most tested polymorphism in psychiatric genetics is a 43-base pair insertion or deletion in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene (5HTT, renamed SLC6A4). About 55% of Caucasians carry a long allele (L) with 16 repeat units. The short allele (S, with 14 repeat units) of this length polymorphism repeat (LPR) reduces transcriptional efficiency, resulting in decreased serotonin transporter expression and function [83]. Because serotonin plays a key role in one of the major theories of MDD [84], and because the most prescribed antidepressants act directly on this transporter, 5HTT is an obvious candidate gene for this disorder. […] The dearth of studies attempting to associate the 5HTTLPR to MDD or related personality traits tells a revealing story about the fate of most candidate genes in psychiatric genetics. Many conflicting findings have been reported, and the two largest studies failed to link the 5HTTLPR to depressive symptoms or clinical MDD [85, 86]. Even at the level of reviews and meta-analyses, conflicting conclusions have been drawn about the role of this polymorphism in the development of MDD [87, 88]. The initially promising explanation for discrepant findings – potential interactive effects of the 5HTTLPR and stressful life events [89] – did not survive meta-analysis [90].”

“Across the board, overlooking the wealth of candidate gene studies on MDD, one is inclined to conclude that this approach has failed to unambiguously identify genetic variants involved in MDD […]. Hope is now focused on the newer GWA [genome wide association] approach. […] At the time of writing, only two GWA studies had been published on MDD [81, 95]. […] In theory, the strategy to identify potential pleiotropic genes in the MDD–CAD relationship is extremely straightforward. We simply select the genes that occur in the lists of confirmed genes from the GWA studies for both traits. In practice, this is hard to do, because genetics in psychiatry is clearly lagging behind genetics in cardiology and diabetes medicine. […] What is shown by the reviewed twin studies is that some genetic variants may influence MDD and CAD risk factors. This can occur through one of three mechanisms: (a) the genetic variants that increase the risk for MDD become part of the heritability of CAD through a causal effect of MDD on CAD risk factors (causality); (b) the genetic variants that increase the risk for CAD become part of the heritability of MDD through a direct causal effect of CAD on MDD (reverse causality); (c) the genetic variants influence shared risk factors that independently increase the risk for MDD as well as CAD (pleiotropy). I suggest that to fully explain the MDD–CAD association we need to be willing to be open to the possibility that these three mechanisms co-exist. Even in the presence of true pleiotropic effects, MDD may influence CAD risk factors, and having CAD in turn may worsen the course of MDD.”

“Patients with depression are more likely to exhibit several unhealthy behaviours or avoid other health-promoting ones than those without depression. […] Patients with depression are more likely to have sleep disturbances [6]. […] sleep deprivation has been linked with obesity, diabetes and the metabolic syndrome [13]. […] Physical inactivity and depression display a complex, bidirectional relationship. Depression leads to physical inactivity and physical inactivity exacerbates depression [19]. […] smoking rates among those with depression are about twice that of the general population [29]. […] Poor attention to self-care is often a problem among those with major depressive disorder. In the most severe cases, those with depression may become inattentive to their personal hygiene. One aspect of this relationship that deserves special attention with respect to cardiovascular disease is the association of depression and periodontal disease. […] depression is associated with poor adherence to medical treatment regimens in many chronic illnesses, including heart disease. […] There is some evidence that among patients with an acute coronary syndrome, improvement in depression is associated with improvement in adherence. […] Individuals with depression are often socially withdrawn or isolated. It has been shown that patients with heart disease who are depressed have less social support [64], and that social isolation or poor social support is associated with increased mortality in heart disease patients [65–68]. […] [C]linicians who make recommendations to patients recovering from a heart attack should be aware that low levels of social support and social isolation are particularly common among depressed individuals and that high levels of social support appear to protect patients from some of the negative effects of depression [78].”

“Self-efficacy describes an individual’s self-confidence in his/her ability to accomplish a particular task or behaviour. Self-efficacy is an important construct to consider when one examines the psychological mechanisms linking depression and heart disease, since it influences an individual’s engagement in behaviour and lifestyle changes that may be critical to improving cardiovascular risk. Many studies on individuals with chronic illness show that depression is often associated with low self-efficacy [95–97]. […] Low self-efficacy is associated with poor adherence behaviour in patients with heart failure [101]. […] Much of the interest in self-efficacy comes from the fact that it is modifiable. Self-efficacy-enhancing interventions have been shown to improve cardiac patients’ self-efficacy and thereby improve cardiac health outcomes [102]. […] One problem with targeting self-efficacy in depressed heart disease patients is [however] that depressive symptoms reduce the effects of self-efficacy-enhancing interventions [105, 106].”

“Taken together, [the] SADHART and ENRICHD [studies] suggest, but do not prove, that antidepressant drug therapy in general, and SSRI treatment in particular, improve cardiovascular outcomes in depressed post-acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients. […] even large epidemiological studies of depression and antidepressant treatment are not usually informative, because they confound the effects of depression and antidepressant treatment. […] However, there is one Finnish cohort study in which all subjects […] were followed up through a nationwide computerised database [17]. The purpose of this study was not to examine the relationship between depression and cardiac mortality, but rather to look at the relationship between antidepressant use and suicide. […] unexpectedly, ‘antidepressant use, and especially SSRI use, was associated with a marked reduction in total mortality (=49%, p < 0.001), mostly attributable to a decrease in cardiovascular deaths’. The study involved 15 390 patients with a mean follow-up of 3.4 years […] One of the marked differences between the SSRIs and the earlier tricyclic antidepressants is that the SSRIs do not cause cardiac death in overdose as the tricyclics do [41]. There has been literature that suggested that tricyclics even at therapeutic doses could be cardiotoxic and more problematic than SSRIs [42, 43]. What has been surprising is that both in the clinical trial data from ENRICHD and the epidemiological data from Finland, tricyclic treatment has also been associated with a decreased risk of mortality. […] Given that SSRI treatment of depression in the post-ACS period is safe, effective in reducing depressed mood, able to improve health behaviours and may reduce subsequent cardiac morbidity and mortality, it would seem obvious that treating depression is strongly indicated. However, the vast majority of post-ACS patients will not see a psychiatrically trained professional and many cases are not identified [33].”

“That depression is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality is no longer open to question. Similarly, there is no question that the risk of morbidity and mortality increases with increasing severity of depression. Questions remain about the mechanisms that underlie this association, whether all types of depression carry the same degree of risk and to what degree treating depression reduces that risk. There is no question that the benefits of treating depression associated with coronary artery disease far outweigh the risks.”

“Two competing trends are emerging in research on psychotherapy for depression in cardiac patients. First, the few rigorous RCTs that have been conducted so far have shown that even the most efficacious of the current generation of interventions produce relatively modest outcomes. […] Second, there is a growing recognition that, even if an intervention is highly efficacious, it may be difficult to translate into clinical practice if it requires intensive or extensive contacts with a highly trained, experienced, clinically sophisticated psychotherapist. It can even be difficult to implement such interventions in the setting of carefully controlled, randomised efficacy trials. Consequently, there are efforts to develop simpler, more efficient interventions that can be delivered by a wider variety of interventionists. […] Although much more work remains to be done in this area, enough is already known about psychotherapy for comorbid depression in heart disease to suggest that a higher priority should be placed on translation of this research into clinical practice. In many cases, cardiac patients do not receive any treatment for their depression.”

August 14, 2017 Posted by | Books, Cardiology, Diabetes, Genetics, Medicine, Pharmacology, Psychiatry, Psychology | Leave a comment

Depression and Heart Disease (I)

I’m currently reading this book. It’s a great book, with lots of interesting observations.

Below I’ve added some quotes from the book.

“Frasure-Smith et al. [1] demonstrated that patients diagnosed with depression post MI [myocardial infarction, US] were more than five times more likely to die from cardiac causes by 6 months than those without major depression. At 18 months, cardiac mortality had reached 20% in patients with major depression, compared with only 3% in non-depressed patients [5]. Recent work has confirmed and extended these findings. A meta-analysis of 22 studies of post-MI subjects found that post-MI depression was associated with a 2.0–2.5 increased risk of negative cardiovascular outcomes [6]. Another meta-analysis examining 20 studies of subjects with MI, coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), angioplasty or angiographically documented CAD found a twofold increased risk of death among depressed compared with non-depressed patients [7]. Though studies included in these meta-analyses had substantial methodological variability, the overall results were quite similar [8].”

“Blumenthal et al. [31] published the largest cohort study (N = 817) to date on depression in patients undergoing CABG and measured depression scores, using the CES-D, before and at 6 months after CABG. Of those patients, 26% had minor depression (CES-D score 16–26) and 12% had moderate to severe depression (CES-D score =27). Over a mean follow-up of 5.2 years, the risk of death, compared with those without depression, was 2.4 (HR adjusted; 95% CI 1.4, 4.0) in patients with moderate to severe depression and 2.2 (95% CI 1.2, 4.2) in those whose depression persisted from baseline to follow-up at 6 months. This is one of the few studies that found a dose response (in terms of severity and duration) between depression and death in CABG in particular and in CAD in general.”

“Of the patients with known CAD but no recent MI, 12–23% have major depressive disorder by DSM-III or DSM-IV criteria [20, 21]. Two studies have examined the prognostic association of depression in patients whose CAD was confirmed by angiography. […] In [Carney et al.], a diagnosis of major depression by DSM-III criteria was the best predictor of cardiac events (MI, bypass surgery or death) at 1 year, more potent than other clinical risk factors such as impaired left ventricular function, severity of coronary disease and smoking among the 52 patients. The relative risk of a cardiac event was 2.2 times higher in patients with major depression than those with no depression.[…] Barefoot et al. [23] provided a larger sample size and longer follow-up duration in their study of 1250 patients who had undergone their first angiogram. […] Compared with non-depressed patients, those who were moderately to severely depressed had 69% higher odds of cardiac death and 78% higher odds of all-cause mortality. The mildly depressed had a 38% higher risk of cardiac death and a 57% higher risk of all-cause mortality than non-depressed patients.”

“Ford et al. [43] prospectively followed all male medical students who entered the Johns Hopkins Medical School from 1948 to 1964. At entry, the participants completed questionnaires about their personal and family history, health status and health behaviour, and underwent a standard medical examination. The cohort was then followed after graduation by mailed, annual questionnaires. The incidence of depression in this study was based on the mailed surveys […] 1190 participants [were included in the] analysis. The cumulative incidence of clinical depression in this population at 40 years of follow-up was 12%, with no evidence of a temporal change in the incidence. […] In unadjusted analysis, clinical depression was associated with an almost twofold higher risk of subsequent CAD. This association remained after adjustment for time-dependent covariates […]. The relative risk ratio for CAD development with versus without clinical depression was 2.12 (95% CI 1.24, 3.63), as was their relative risk ratio for future MI (95% CI 1.11, 4.06), after adjustment for age, baseline serum cholesterol level, parental MI, physical activity, time-dependent smoking, hypertension and diabetes. The median time from the first episode of clinical depression to first CAD event was 15 years, with a range of 1–44 years.”

“In the Women’s Ischaemia Syndrome Evaluation (WISE) study, 505 women referred for coronary angiography were followed for a mean of 4.9 years and completed the BDI [46]. Significantly increased mortality and cardiovascular events were found among women with elevated BDI scores, even after adjustment for age, cholesterol, stenosis score on angiography, smoking, diabetes, education, hyper-tension and body mass index (RR 3.1; 95% CI 1.5, 6.3). […] Further compelling evidence comes from a meta-analysis of 28 studies comprising almost 80 000 subjects [47], which demonstrated that, despite heterogeneity and differences in study quality, depression was consistently associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases in general, including stroke.”

“The preponderance of evidence strongly suggests that depression is a risk factor for CAD [coronary artery disease, US] development. […] In summary, it is fair to conclude that depression plays a significant role in CAD development, independent of conventional risk factors, and its adverse impact endures over time. The impact of depression on the risk of MI is probably similar to that of smoking [52]. […] Results of longitudinal cohort studies suggest that depression occurs before the onset of clinically significant CAD […] Recent brain imaging studies have indicated that lesions resulting from cerebrovascular insufficiency may lead to clinical depression [54, 55]. Depression may be a clinical manifestation of atherosclerotic lesions in certain areas of the brain that cause circulatory deficits. The depression then exacerbates the onset of CAD. The exact aetiological mechanism of depression and CAD development remains to be clarified.”

“Rutledge et al. [65] conducted a meta-analysis in 2006 in order to better understand the prevalence of depression among patients with CHF and the magnitude of the relationship between depression and clinical outcomes in the CHF population. They found that clinically significant depression was present in 21.5% of CHF patients, varying by the use of questionnaires versus diagnostic interview (33.6% and 19.3%, respectively). The combined results suggested higher rates of death and secondary events (RR 2.1; 95% CI 1.7, 2.6), and trends toward increased health care use and higher rates of hospitalisation and emergency room visits among depressed patients.”

“In the past 15 years, evidence has been provided that physically healthy subjects who suffer from depression are at increased risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality [1, 2], and that the occurrence of depression in patients with either unstable angina [3] or myocardial infarction (MI) [4] increases the risk for subsequent cardiac death. Moreover, epidemiological studies have proved that cardiovascular disease is a risk factor for depression, since the prevalence of depression in individuals with a recent MI or with coronary artery disease (CAD) or congestive heart failure has been found to be significantly higher than in the general population [5, 6]. […] findings suggest a bidirectional association between depression and cardiovascular disease. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this association are, at present, largely unclear, but several candidate mechanisms have been proposed.”

“Autonomic nervous system dysregulation is one of the most plausible candidate mechanisms underlying the relationship between depression and ischaemic heart disease, since changes of autonomic tone have been detected in both depression and cardiovascular disease [7], and autonomic imbalance […] has been found to lower the threshold for ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation and sudden cardiac death in patients with CAD [8, 9]. […] Imbalance between prothrombotic and antithrombotic mechanisms and endothelial dysfunction have [also] been suggested to contribute to the increased risk of cardiac events in both medically well patients with depression and depressed patients with CAD. Depression has been consistently associated with enhanced platelet activation […] evidence has accumulated that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) reduce platelet hyperreactivity and hyperaggregation of depressed patients [39, 40] and reduce the release of the platelet/endothelial biomarkers ß-thromboglobulin, P-selectin and E-selectin in depressed patients with acute CAD [41]. This may explain the efficacy of SSRIs in reducing the risk of mortality in depressed patients with CAD [42–44].”

“[S]everal studies have shown that reduced endothelium-dependent flow-mediated vasodilatation […] occurs in depressed adults with or without CAD [48–50]. Atherosclerosis with subsequent plaque rupture and thrombosis is the main determinant of ischaemic cardiovascular events, and atherosclerosis itself is now recognised to be fundamentally an inflammatory disease [56]. Since activation of inflammatory processes is common to both depression and cardiovascular disease, it would be reasonable to argue that the link between depression and ischaemic heart disease might be mediated by inflammation. Evidence has been provided that major depression is associated with a significant increase in circulating levels of both pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and TNF-a, and inflammatory acute phase proteins, especially the C-reactive protein (CRP) [57, 58], and that antidepressant treatment is able to normalise CRP levels irrespective of whether or not patients are clinically improved [59]. […] Vaccarino et al. [79] assessed specifically whether inflammation is the mechanism linking depression to ischaemic cardiac events and found that, in women with suspected coronary ischaemia, depression was associated with increased circulating levels of CRP and IL-6 and was a strong predictor of ischaemic cardiac events”

“Major depression has been consistently associated with hyperactivity of the HPA axis, with a consequent overstimulation of the sympathetic nervous system, which in turn results in increased circulating catecholamine levels and enhanced serum cortisol concentrations [68–70]. This may cause an imbalance in sympathetic and parasympathetic activity, which results in elevated heart rate and blood pressure, reduced HRV [heart rate variability], disruption of ventricular electrophysiology with increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias as well as an increased risk of atherosclerotic plaque rupture and acute coronary thrombosis. […] In addition, glucocorticoids mobilise free fatty acids, causing endothelial inflammation and excessive clotting, and are associated with hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia and glucose dysregulation [88, 89], which are risk factors for CAD.”

“Most of the literature on [the] comorbidity [between major depressive disorder (MDD) and coronary artery disease (CAD), US] has tended to favour the hypothesis of a causal effect of MDD on CAD, but reversed causality has also been suggested to contribute. Patients with severe CAD at baseline, and consequently a worse prognosis, may simply be more prone to report mood disturbances than less severely ill patients. Furthermore, in pre-morbid populations, insipid atherosclerosis in cerebral vessels may cause depressive symptoms before the onset of actual cardiac or cerebrovascular events, a variant of reverse causality known as the ‘vascular depression’ hypothesis [2]. To resolve causality, comorbidity between MDD and CAD has been addressed in longitudinal designs. Most prospective studies reported that clinical depression or depressive symptoms at baseline predicted higher incidence of heart disease at follow-up [1], which seems to favour the hypothesis of causal effects of MDD. We need to remind ourselves, however […] [that] [p]rospective associations do not necessarily equate causation. Higher incidence of CAD in depressed individuals may reflect the operation of common underlying factors on MDD and CAD that become manifest in mental health at an earlier stage than in cardiac health. […] [T]he association between MDD and CAD may be due to underlying genetic factors that lead to increased symptoms of anxiety and depression, but may also independently influence the atherosclerotic process. This phenomenon, where low-level biological variation has effects on multiple complex traits at the organ and behavioural level, is called genetic ‘pleiotropy’. If present in a time-lagged form, that is if genetic effects on MDD risk precede effects of the same genetic variants on CAD risk, this phenomenon can cause longitudinal correlations that mimic a causal effect of MDD.”

 

August 12, 2017 Posted by | Books, Cardiology, Genetics, Medicine, Neurology, Pharmacology, Psychiatry, Psychology | Leave a comment

A few diabetes papers of interest

i. Long-term Glycemic Variability and Risk of Adverse Outcomes: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

“This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluates the association between HbA1c variability and micro- and macrovascular complications and mortality in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. […] Seven studies evaluated HbA1c variability among patients with type 1 diabetes and showed an association of HbA1c variability with renal disease (risk ratio 1.56 [95% CI 1.08–2.25], two studies), cardiovascular events (1.98 [1.39–2.82]), and retinopathy (2.11 [1.54–2.89]). Thirteen studies evaluated HbA1c variability among patients with type 2 diabetes. Higher HbA1c variability was associated with higher risk of renal disease (1.34 [1.15–1.57], two studies), macrovascular events (1.21 [1.06–1.38]), ulceration/gangrene (1.50 [1.06–2.12]), cardiovascular disease (1.27 [1.15–1.40]), and mortality (1.34 [1.18–1.53]). Most studies were retrospective with lack of adjustment for potential confounders, and inconsistency existed in the definition of HbA1c variability.

CONCLUSIONS HbA1c variability was positively associated with micro- and macrovascular complications and mortality independently of the HbA1c level and might play a future role in clinical risk assessment.”

Two observations related to the paper: One, although only a relatively small number of studies were included in the review, the number of patients included in some of those included studies was rather large – the 7 type 1 studies thus included 44,021 participants, and the 13 type 2 studies included in total 43,620 participants. Two, it’s noteworthy that some of the associations already look at least reasonably strong, despite interest in HbA1c variability being a relatively recent phenomenon. Confounding might be an issue, but then again it almost always might be, and to give an example, out of 11 studies analyzing the association between renal disease and HbA1c variability included in the review, ten of them support a link and the only one which does not was a small study on pediatric patients which was almost certainly underpowered to investigate such a link in the first place (the base rate of renal complications is, as mentioned before here on this blog quite recently (link 3), quite low in pediatric samples).

ii. Risk of Severe Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetes Over 30 Years of Follow-up in the DCCT/EDIC Study.

(I should perhaps note here that I’m already quite familiar with the context of the DCCT/EDIC study/studies, and although readers may not be, and although background details are included in the paper, I decided not to cover such details here although they would make my coverage of the paper easier to understand. I instead decided to limit my coverage of the paper to a few observations which I myself found to be of interest.)

“During the DCCT, the rates of SH [Severe Hypoglycemia, US], including episodes with seizure or coma, were approximately threefold greater in the intensive treatment group than in the conventional treatment group […] During EDIC, the frequency of SH increased in the former conventional group and decreased in the former intensive group so that the difference in SH event rates between the two groups was no longer significant (36.6 vs. 40.8 episodes per 100 patient-years, respectively […] By the end of DCCT, with an average of 6.5 years of follow-up, 65% of the intensive group versus 35% of the conventional group experienced at least one episode of SH. In contrast, ∼50% of participants within each group reported an episode of SH during the 20 years of EDIC.”

“Of [the] participants reporting episodes of SH, during the DCCT, 54% of the intensive group and 30% of the conventional group experienced four or more episodes, whereas in EDIC, 37% of the intensive group and 33% of the conventional group experienced four or more events […]. Moreover, a subset of participants (14% [99 of 714]) experienced nearly one-half of all SH episodes (1,765 of 3,788) in DCCT, and a subset of 7% (52 of 709) in EDIC experienced almost one-third of all SH episodes (888 of 2,813) […] Fifty-one major accidents occurred during the 6.5 years of DCCT and 143 during the 20 years of EDIC […] The most frequent type of major accident was that involving a motor vehicle […] Hypoglycemia played a role as a possible, probable, or principal cause in 18 of 28 operator-caused motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) during DCCT […] and in 23 of 54 operator-caused MVAs during EDIC”.

“The T1D Exchange Clinic Registry recently reported that 8% of 4,831 adults with T1D living in the U.S. had a seizure or coma event during the 3 months before their most recent annual visit (11). During EDIC, we observed that 27% of the cohort experienced a coma or seizure event over the 20 years of 3-month reporting intervals (∼1.4% per year), a much lower annual risk than in the T1D Exchange Clinic Registry. In part, the open enrollment of patients into the T1D Exchange may be reflected without the exclusion of participants with a history of SH as in the DCCT and other clinical trials. The current data support the clinical perception that a small subset of individuals is more susceptible to SH (7% of patients with 11 or more SH episodes during EDIC, which represents 32% of all SH episodes in EDIC) […] a history of SH during DCCT and lower current HbA1c levels were the two major factors associated with an increased risk of SH during EDIC. Safety concerns were the reason why a history of frequent SH events was an exclusion criterion for enrollment in DCCT. […] Of note, we found that participants who entered the DCCT as adolescents were more likely to experience SH during EDIC.”

“In summary, although event rates in the DCCT/EDIC cohort seem to have fallen and stabilized over time, SH remains an ever-present threat for patients with T1D who use current technology, occurring at a rate of ∼36–41 episodes per 100 patient-years, even among those with longer diabetes duration. Having experienced one or more such prior events is the strongest predictor of a future SH episode.”

I didn’t actually like that summary. If a history of severe hypoglycemia was an exclusion criterion in the DCCT trial, which it was, then the event rate you’d get from this data set is highly likely to provide a biased estimator of the true event rate, as the Exchange Clinic Registry data illustrate. The true population event rate in unselected samples is higher.

Another note which may also be important to add is that many diabetics who do not have a ‘severe event’ during a specific time period might still experience a substantial number of hypoglycemic episodes; ‘severe events’ (which require the assistance of another individual) is a somewhat blunt instrument in particular for assessing quality-of-life aspects of hypoglycemia.

iii. The Presence and Consequence of Nonalbuminuric Chronic Kidney Disease in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes.

“This study investigated the prevalence of nonalbuminuric chronic kidney disease in type 1 diabetes to assess whether it increases the risk of cardiovascular and renal outcomes as well as all-cause mortality. […] This was an observational follow-up of 3,809 patients with type 1 diabetes from the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy Study. […] mean age was 37.6 ± 11.8 years and duration of diabetes 21.2 ± 12.1 years. […] During 13 years of median follow-up, 378 developed end-stage renal disease, 415 suffered an incident cardiovascular event, and 406 died. […] At baseline, 78 (2.0%) had nonalbuminuric chronic kidney disease. […] Nonalbuminuric chronic kidney disease did not increase the risk of albuminuria (hazard ratio [HR] 2.0 [95% CI 0.9–4.4]) or end-stage renal disease (HR 6.4 [0.8–53.0]) but did increase the risk of cardiovascular events (HR 2.0 [1.4–3.5]) and all-cause mortality (HR 2.4 [1.4–3.9]). […] ESRD [End-Stage Renal Disease] developed during follow-up in 0.3% of patients with nonalbuminuric non-CKD [CKD: Chronic Kidney Disease], in 1.3% of patients with nonalbuminuric CKD, in 13.9% of patients with albuminuric non-CKD, and in 63.0% of patients with albuminuric CKD (P < 0.001).”

CONCLUSIONS Nonalbuminuric chronic kidney disease is not a frequent finding in patients with type 1 diabetes, but when present, it is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and all-cause mortality but not with renal outcomes.”

iv. Use of an α-Glucosidase Inhibitor and the Risk of Colorectal Cancer in Patients With Diabetes: A Nationwide, Population-Based Cohort Study.

This one relates closely to stuff covered in Horowitz & Samsom’s book about Gastrointestinal Function in Diabetes Mellitus which I just finished (and which I liked very much). Here’s a relevant quote from chapter 7 of that book (which is about ‘Hepato-biliary and Pancreatic Function’):

“Several studies have provided evidence that the risk of pancreatic cancer is increased in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus [136,137]. In fact, diabetes has been associated with an increased risk of several cancers, including those of the pancreas, liver, endometrium and kidney [136]. The pooled relative risk of pancreatic cancer for diabetics vs. non-diabetics in a meta-analysis was 2.1 (95% confidence interval 1.6–2.8). Patients presenting with diabetes mellitus within a period of 12 months of the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer were excluded because in these cases diabetes may be an early presenting sign of pancreatic cancer rather than a risk factor [137]”.

They don’t mention colon cancer there, but it’s obvious from the research which has been done – and which is covered extensively in that book – that diabetes has the potential to cause functional changes in a large number of components of the digestive system (and I hope to cover this kind of stuff in a lot more detail later on) so the fact that some of these changes may lead to neoplastic changes should hardly be surprising. However evaluating causal pathways is more complicated here than it might have been, because e.g. pancreatic diseases may also themselves cause secondary diabetes in some patients. Liver pathologies like hepatitis B and C also display positive associations with diabetes, although again causal pathways here are not completely clear; treatments used may be a contributing factor (interferon-treatment may induce diabetes), but there are also suggestions that diabetes should be considered one of the extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis. This stuff is complicated.

The drug mentioned in the paper, acarbose, is incidentally a drug also discussed in some detail in the book. It belongs to a group of drugs called alpha glucosidase inhibitors, and it is ‘the first antidiabetic medication designed to act through an influence on intestinal functions.’ Anyway, some quotes from the paper:

“We conducted a nationwide, population-based study using a large cohort with diabetes in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Patients with newly diagnosed diabetes (n = 1,343,484) were enrolled between 1998 and 2010. One control subject not using acarbose was randomly selected for each subject using acarbose after matching for age, sex, diabetes onset, and comorbidities. […] There were 1,332 incident cases of colorectal cancer in the cohort with diabetes during the follow-up period of 1,487,136 person-years. The overall incidence rate was 89.6 cases per 100,000 person-years. Patients treated with acarbose had a 27% reduction in the risk of colorectal cancer compared with control subjects. The adjusted HRs were 0.73 (95% CI 0.63–0.83), 0.69 (0.59–0.82), and 0.46 (0.37–0.58) for patients using >0 to <90, 90 to 364, and ≥365 cumulative defined daily doses of acarbose, respectively, compared with subjects who did not use acarbose (P for trend < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS Acarbose use reduced the risk of incident colorectal cancer in patients with diabetes in a dose-dependent manner.”

It’s perhaps worth mentioning that the prevalence of type 1 is relatively low in East Asian populations and that most of the patients included were type 2 (this is also clearly indicated by this observation from the paper: “The median age at the time of the initial diabetes diagnosis was 54.1 years, and the median diabetes duration was 8.9 years.”). Another thing worth mentioning is that colon cancer is a very common type of cancer, and so even moderate risk reductions here at the individual level may translate into a substantial risk reduction at the population level. A third thing, noted in Horowitz & Samsom’s coverage, is that the side effects of acarbose are quite mild, so widespread use of the drug is not out of the question, at least poor tolerance is not likely to be an obstacle; the drug may cause e.g. excessive flatulence and something like 10% of patients may have to stop treatment because of gastrointestinal side effects, but although the side effects are annoying and may be unacceptable to some patients, they are not dangerous; it’s a safe drug which can be used even in patients with renal failure (a context where some of the other oral antidiabetic treatments available are contraindicated).

v. Diabetes, Lower-Extremity Amputation, and Death.

“Worldwide, every 30 s, a limb is lost to diabetes (1,2). Nearly 2 million people living in the U.S. are living with limb loss (1). According to the World Health Organization, lower-extremity amputations (LEAs) are 10 times more common in people with diabetes than in persons who do not have diabetes. In the U.S. Medicare population, the incidence of diabetic foot ulcers is ∼6 per 100 individuals with diabetes per year and the incidence of LEA is 4 per 1,000 persons with diabetes per year (3). LEA in those with diabetes generally carries yearly costs between $30,000 and $60,000 and lifetime costs of half a million dollars (4). In 2012, it was estimated that those with diabetes and lower-extremity wounds in the U.S. Medicare program accounted for $41 billion in cost, which is ∼1.6% of all Medicare health care spending (47). In 2012, in the U.K., it was estimated that the National Health Service spent between £639 and 662 million on foot ulcers and LEA, which was approximately £1 in every £150 spent by the National Health Service (8).”

“LEA does not represent a traditional medical complication of diabetes like myocardial infarction (MI), renal failure, or retinopathy in which organ failure is directly associated with diabetes (2). An LEA occurs because of a disease complication, usually a foot ulcer that is not healing (e.g., organ failure of the skin, failure of the biomechanics of the foot as a unit, nerve sensory loss, and/or impaired arterial vascular supply), but it also occurs at least in part as a consequence of a medical plan to amputate based on a decision between health care providers and patients (9,10). […] 30-day postoperative mortality can approach 10% […]. Previous reports have estimated that the 1-year post-LEA mortality rate in people with diabetes is between 10 and 50%, and the 5-year mortality rate post-LEA is between 30 and 80% (4,1315). More specifically, in the U.S. Medicare population mortality within a year after an incident LEA was 23.1% in 2006, 21.8% in 2007, and 20.6% in 2008 (4). In the U.K., up to 80% will die within 5 years of an LEA (8). In general, those with diabetes with an LEA are two to three times more likely to die at any given time point than those with diabetes who have not had an LEA (5). For perspective, the 5-year death rate after diagnosis of malignancy in the U.S. was 32% in 2010 (16).”

“Evidence on why individuals with diabetes and an LEA die is based on a few mainly small (e.g., <300 subjects) and often single center–based (13,1720) studies or <1 year duration of evaluation (11). In these studies, death is primarily associated with a previous history of cardiovascular disease and renal insufficiency, which are also major complications of diabetes; these complications are also associated with an increased risk of LEA. The goal of our study was to determine whether complications of diabetes well-known to be associated with death in those with diabetes such as cardiovascular disease and renal failure fully explain the higher rate of death in those who have undergone an LEA.”

“This is the largest and longest evaluation of the risk of death among those with diabetes and LEA […] Between 2003 and 2012, 416,434 individuals met the entrance criteria for the study. This cohort accrued an average of 9.0 years of follow-up and a total of 3.7 million diabetes person-years of follow-up. During this period of time, 6,566 (1.6%) patients had an LEA and 77,215 patients died (18.5%). […] The percentage of individuals who died within 30 days, 1 year, and by year 5 of their initial code for an LEA was 1.0%, 9.9%, and 27.2%, respectively. For those >65 years of age, the rates were 12.2% and 31.7%, respectively. For the full cohort of those with diabetes, the rate of death was 2.0% after 1 year of follow up and 7.3% after 5 years of follow up. In general, those with an LEA were more than three times more likely to die during a year of follow-up than an individual with diabetes who had not had an LEA. […] In any given year, >5% of those with diabetes and an LEA will die.”

“From 2003 to 2012, the HR [hazard rate, US] for death after an LEA was 3.02 (95% CI 2.90, 3.14). […] our a priori assumption was that the HR associating LEA with death would be fully diminished (i.e., it would become 1) when adjusted for the other risk factor variables. However, the fully adjusted LEA HR was diminished only ∼22% to 2.37 (95% CI 2.27, 2.48). With the exception of age >65 years, individual risk factors, in general, had minimal effect (<10%) on the HR of the association between LEA and death […] We conducted sensitivity analyses to determine the general statistical parameters of an unmeasured risk factor that could remove the association of LEA with death. We found that even if there existed a very strong risk factor with an HR of death of three, a prevalence of 10% in the general diabetes population, and a prevalence of 60% in those who had an LEA, LEA would still be associated with a statistically significant and clinically important risk of 1.30. These findings are describing a variable that would seem to be so common and so highly associated with death that it should already be clinically apparent. […] In summary, individuals with diabetes and an LEA are more likely to die at any given point in time than those who have diabetes but no LEA. While some of this variation can be explained by other known complications of diabetes, the amount that can be explained is small. Based on the results of this study, including a sensitivity analysis, it is highly unlikely that a “new” major risk factor for death exists. […] LEA is often performed because of an end-stage disease process like chronic nonhealing foot ulcer. By the time a patient has a foot ulcer and an LEA is offered, they are likely suffering from the end-stage consequence of diabetes. […] We would […] suggest that patients who have had an LEA require […] vigilant follow-up and evaluation to assure that their medical care is optimized. It is also important that GPs communicate to their patients about the risk of death to assure that patients have proper expectations about the severity of their disease.”

vi. Trends in Health Care Expenditure in U.S. Adults With Diabetes: 2002–2011.

Before quoting from the paper, I’ll remind people reading along here that ‘total medical expenditures’ != ‘total medical costs’. Lots of relevant medical costs are not included when you focus only on direct medical expenditures (sick days, early retirement, premature mortality and productivity losses associated therewith, etc., etc.). With that out of the way…

“This study examines trends in health care expenditures by expenditure category in U.S. adults with diabetes between 2002 and 2011. […] We analyzed 10 years of data representing a weighted population of 189,013,514 U.S. adults aged ≥18 years from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. […] Relative to individuals without diabetes ($5,058 [95% CI 4,949–5,166]), individuals with diabetes ($12,180 [11,775–12,586]) had more than double the unadjusted mean direct expenditures over the 10-year period. After adjustment for confounders, individuals with diabetes had $2,558 (2,266–2,849) significantly higher direct incremental expenditures compared with those without diabetes. For individuals with diabetes, inpatient expenditures rose initially from $4,014 in 2002/2003 to $4,183 in 2004/2005 and then decreased continuously to $3,443 in 2010/2011, while rising steadily for individuals without diabetes. The estimated unadjusted total direct expenditures for individuals with diabetes were $218.6 billion/year and adjusted total incremental expenditures were approximately $46 billion/year. […] in the U.S., direct medical costs associated with diabetes were $176 billion in 2012 (1,3). This is almost double to eight times the direct medical cost of other chronic diseases: $32 billion for COPD in 2010 (10), $93 billion for all cancers in 2008 (11), $21 billion for heart failure in 2012 (12), and $43 billion for hypertension in 2010 (13). In the U.S., total economic cost of diabetes rose by 41% from 2007 to 2012 (2). […] Our findings show that compared with individuals without diabetes, individuals with diabetes had significantly higher health expenditures from 2002 to 2011 and the bulk of the expenditures came from hospital inpatient and prescription expenditures.”

 

August 10, 2017 Posted by | Books, Cancer/oncology, Cardiology, Diabetes, Economics, Epidemiology, Gastroenterology, Health Economics, Medicine, Nephrology, Pharmacology | Leave a comment

Infectious Disease Surveillance (I)

Concepts and Methods in Infectious Disease Surveillance […] familiarizes the reader with basic surveillance concepts; the legal basis for surveillance in the United States and abroad; and the purposes, structures, and intended uses of surveillance at the local, state, national, and international level. […] A desire for a readily accessible, concise resource that detailed current methods and challenges in disease surveillance inspired the collaborations that resulted in this volume. […] The book covers major topics at an introductory-to-intermediate level and was designed to serve as a resource or class text for instructors. It can be used in graduate level courses in public health, human and veterinary medicine, as well as in undergraduate programs in public health–oriented disciplines. We hope that the book will be a useful primer for frontline public health practitioners, hospital epidemiologists, infection-control practitioners, laboratorians in public health settings, infectious disease researchers, and medical informatics specialists interested in a concise overview of infectious disease surveillance.”

I thought the book was sort of okay, but not really all that great. I assume part of the reason I didn’t like it as much as I might have is that someone like me don’t really need to know all the details about, say, the issues encountered in Florida while they were trying to implement electronic patient records, or whether or not the mandated reporting requirements for brucellosis in, say, Texas are different from those of, say, Florida – but the book has a lot of that kind of information. Useful knowledge if you work with this stuff, but if you don’t and you’re just curious about the topic ‘in a general way’ those kinds of details can subtract a bit from the experience. A lot of chapters cover similar topics and don’t seem all that well coordinated, in the sense that details which could easily have been left out of specific chapters without any significant information loss (because those details were covered elsewhere in the publication) are included anyway; we are probably told at least ten times what is the difference between active and passive surveillance. It probably means that the various chapters can be read more or less independently (you don’t need to read chapter 5 to understand the coverage in chapter 11), but if you’re reading the book from cover to cover the way I was that sort of approach is not ideal. However in terms of the coverage included in the individual chapters and the content in general, I feel reasonably confident that if you’re actually working in public health or related fields and so a lot of this stuff might be ‘work-relevant’ (especially if you’re from the US), it’s probably a very useful book to keep around/know about. I didn’t need to know how many ‘NBS-states’ there are, and whether or not South Carolina is such a state, but some people might.

As I’ve pointed out before, a two star goodreads rating on my part (which is the rating I gave this publication) is not an indication that I think a book is terrible, it’s an indication that the book is ‘okay’.

Below I’ve added some quotes and observations from the book. The book is an academic publication but it is not a ‘classic textbook’ with key items in bold etc.; I decided to use bold to highlight key concepts and observations below, to make the post easier to navigate later on (none of the bolded words below were in bold in the original text), but aside from that I have made no changes to the quotes included in this post. I would note that given that many of the chapters included in the book are not covered by copyright (many chapters include this observation: “Materials appearing in this chapter are prepared by individuals as part of their official duties as United States government employees and are not covered by the copyright of the book, and any views expressed herein do not necessarily represent the views of the United States government.”) I may decide to cover the book in a bit more detail than I otherwise would have.

“The methods used for infectious disease surveillance depend on the type of disease. Part of the rationale for this is that there are fundamental differences in etiology, mode of transmission, and control measures between different types of infections. […] Despite the fact that much of surveillance is practiced on a disease-specific basis, it is worth remembering that surveillance is a general tool used across all types of infectious and, noninfectious conditions, and, as such, all surveillance methods share certain core elements. We advocate the view that surveillance should not be regarded as a public health “specialty,” but rather that all public health practitioners should understand the general principles underlying surveillance.”

“Control of disease spread is achieved through public health actions. Public health actions resulting from information gained during the investigation usually go beyond what an individual physician can provide to his or her patients presenting in a clinical setting. Examples of public health actions include identifying the source of infection […] identifying persons who were in contact with the index case or any infected person who may need vaccines or antiinfectives to prevent them from developing the infection; closure of facilities implicated in disease spread; or isolation of sick individuals or, in rare circumstances, quarantining those exposed to an infected person. […] Monitoring surveillance data enables public health authorities to detect sudden changes in disease occurrence and distribution, identify changes in agents or host factors, and detect changes in healthcare practices […] The primary use of surveillance data at the local and state public health level is to identify cases or outbreaks in order to implement immediate disease control and prevention activities. […] Surveillance data are also used by states and CDC to monitor disease trends, demonstrate the need for public health interventions such as vaccines and vaccine policy, evaluate public health activities, and identify future research priorities. […] The final and most-important link in the surveillance chain is the application of […] data to disease prevention and control. A surveillance system includes a functional capacity for data collection, analysis, and dissemination linked to public health programs [6].

“The majority of reportable disease surveillance is conducted through passive surveillance methods. Passive surveillance means that public health agencies inform healthcare providers and other entities of their reporting requirements, but they do not usually conduct intensive efforts to solicit all cases; instead, the public health agency waits for the healthcare entities to submit case reports. Because passive surveillance is often incomplete, public health agencies may use hospital discharge data, laboratory testing records, mortality data, or other sources of information as checks on completeness of reporting and to identify additional cases. This is called active surveillance. Active surveillance usually includes intensive activities on the part of the public health agency to identify all cases of a specific reportable disease or group of diseases. […] Because it can be very labor intensive, active surveillance is usually conducted for a subset of reportable conditions, in a defined geographic locale and for a defined period of time.”

“Active surveillance may be conducted on a routine basis or in response to an outbreak […]. When an outbreak is suspected or identified, another type of surveillance known as enhanced passive surveillance may also be initiated. In enhanced passive surveillance methods, public health may improve communication with the healthcare community, schools, daycare centers, and other facilities and request that all suspected cases be reported to public health. […] Case-based surveillance is supplemented through laboratory-based surveillance activities. As opposed to case-based surveillance, the focus is on laboratory results themselves, independent of whether or not an individual’s result is associated with a “case” of illness meeting the surveillance case definition. Laboratory-based surveillance is conducted by state public health laboratories as well as the healthcare community (e.g., hospital, private medical office, and commercial laboratories). […] State and local public health entities participate in sentinel surveillance activities. With sentinel methods, surveillance is conducted in a sample of reporting entities, such as healthcare providers or hospitals, or in a specific population known to be an early indicator of disease activity (e.g., pediatric). However, because the goal of sentinel surveillance is not to identify every case, it is not necessarily representative of the underlying population of interest; and results should be interpreted accordingly.”

Syndromic surveillance identifies unexpected changes in prediagnostic information from a variety of sources to detect potential outbreaks [56]. Sources include work- or school-absenteeism records, pharmacy sales for over-the-counter pharmaceuticals, or emergency room admission data [51]. During the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, syndromic surveillance of emergency room visits for influenza-like illness correlated well with laboratory diagnosed cases of influenza [57]. […] According to a 2008 survey of U.S. health departments, 88% of respondents reported that they employ syndromic-based approaches as part of routine surveillance [21].

“Public health operated for many decades (and still does to some extent) using stand-alone, case-based information systems for collection of surveillance data that do not allow information sharing between systems and do not permit the ability to track the occurrences of different diseases in a specific person over time. One of the primary objectives of NEDSS [National Electronic Disease Surveillance System] is to promote person-based surveillance and integrated and interoperable surveillance systems. In an integrated person-based system, information is collected to create a public health record for a given person for different diseases over time. This enables public health to track public health conditions associated with a person over time, allowing analyses of public health events and comorbidities, as well as more robust public health interventions. An interoperable system can exchange information with other systems. For example, data are shared between surveillance systems or between other public health or clinical systems, such as an electronic health record or outbreak management system. Achieving the goal of establishing a public health record for an individual over time does not require one monolithic system that supports all needs; this can, instead, be achieved through integration and/or interoperability of systems.

“For over a decade, public health has focused on automation of reporting of laboratory results to public health from clinical laboratories and healthcare providers. Paper-based submission of laboratory results to public health for reportable conditions results in delays in receipt of information, incomplete ascertainment of possible cases, and missing information on individual reports. All of these aspects are improved through automation of the process [39–43].”

“During the pre-vaccine era, rotavirus infected nearly every unvaccinated child before their fifth birthday. In the absence of vaccine, multiple rotavirus infections may occur during infancy and childhood. Rotavirus causes severe diarrhea and vomiting (acute gastroenteritis [AGE]), which can lead to dehydration, electrolyte depletion, complications of viremia, shock, and death. Nearly one-half million children around the world die of rotavirus infections each year […] [In the US] this virus was responsible for 40–50% of hospitalizations because of acute gastroenteritis during the winter months in the era before vaccines were introduced. […] Because first infections have been shown to induce strong immunity against severe rotavirus reinfections [3] and because vaccination mimics such first infections without causing illness, vaccination was identified as the optimal strategy for decreasing the burden associated with severe and fatal rotavirus diarrhea. Any changes that may be later attributed to vaccination effects require knowledge of the pre-licensure (i.e., baseline) rates and trends in the target disease as a reference […] Efforts to obtain baseline data are necessary before a vaccine is licensed and introduced [13]. […] After the first year of widespread rotavirus vaccination coverage in 2008, very large and consistent decreases in rotavirus hospitalizations were noted around the country. Many of the decreases in childhood hospitalizations resulting from rotavirus were 90% or more, compared with the pre-licensure, baseline period.”

There is no single perfect data source for assessing any VPD [Vaccine-Preventable Disease, US]. Meaningful surveillance is achieved by the much broader approach of employing diverse datasets. The true impact of a vaccine or the accurate assessment of disease trends in a population is more likely the result of evaluating many datasets having different strengths and weaknesses. Only by understanding these strengths and weaknesses can a public health practitioner give the appropriate consideration to the findings derived from these data. […] In a Phase III clinical trial, the vaccine is typically administered to large numbers of people who have met certain inclusionary and exclusionary criteria and are then randomly selected to receive either the vaccine or a placebo. […] Phase III trials represent the “best case scenario” of vaccine protection […] Once the Phase III trials show adequate protection and safety, the vaccine may be licensed by the FDA […] When the vaccine is used in routine clinical practice, Phase IV trials (called post-licensure studies or post-marketing studies) are initiated. These are the evaluations conducted during the course of VPD surveillance that delineate additional performance information in settings where strict controls on who receives the vaccine are not present. […] Often, measuring vaccine performance in the broader population yields slightly lower protective results compared to Phase III clinical trials […] During these post-licensure Phase IV studies, it is not the vaccine’s efficacy but its effectiveness that is assessed. […] Administrative datasets may be created by research institutions, managed-care organizations, or national healthcare utilization repositories. They are not specifically created for VPD surveillance and may contain coded data […] on health events. They often do not provide laboratory confirmation of specific diseases, unlike passive and active VPD surveillance. […] administrative datasets offer huge sample sizes, which allow for powerful inferences within the confines of any data limitations.”

August 6, 2017 Posted by | Books, Epidemiology, Infectious disease, Medicine, Pharmacology | Leave a comment

A few diabetes papers of interest

i. Clinically Relevant Cognitive Impairment in Middle-Aged Adults With Childhood-Onset Type 1 Diabetes.

“Modest cognitive dysfunction is consistently reported in children and young adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D) (1). Mental efficiency, psychomotor speed, executive functioning, and intelligence quotient appear to be most affected (2); studies report effect sizes between 0.2 and 0.5 (small to modest) in children and adolescents (3) and between 0.4 and 0.8 (modest to large) in adults (2). Whether effect sizes continue to increase as those with T1D age, however, remains unknown.

A key issue not yet addressed is whether aging individuals with T1D have an increased risk of manifesting “clinically relevant cognitive impairment,” defined by comparing individual cognitive test scores to demographically appropriate normative means, as opposed to the more commonly investigated “cognitive dysfunction,” or between-group differences in cognitive test scores. Unlike the extensive literature examining cognitive impairment in type 2 diabetes, we know of only one prior study examining cognitive impairment in T1D (4). This early study reported a higher rate of clinically relevant cognitive impairment among children (10–18 years of age) diagnosed before compared with after age 6 years (24% vs. 6%, respectively) or a non-T1D cohort (6%).”

“This study tests the hypothesis that childhood-onset T1D is associated with an increased risk of developing clinically relevant cognitive impairment detectable by middle age. We compared cognitive test results between adults with and without T1D and used demographically appropriate published norms (1012) to determine whether participants met criteria for impairment for each test; aging and dementia studies have selected a score ≥1.5 SD worse than the norm on that test, corresponding to performance at or below the seventh percentile (13).”

“During 2010–2013, 97 adults diagnosed with T1D and aged <18 years (age and duration 49 ± 7 and 41 ± 6 years, respectively; 51% female) and 138 similarly aged adults without T1D (age 49 ± 7 years; 55% female) completed extensive neuropsychological testing. Biomedical data on participants with T1D were collected periodically since 1986–1988.  […] The prevalence of clinically relevant cognitive impairment was five times higher among participants with than without T1D (28% vs. 5%; P < 0.0001), independent of education, age, or blood pressure. Effect sizes were large (Cohen d 0.6–0.9; P < 0.0001) for psychomotor speed and visuoconstruction tasks and were modest (d 0.3–0.6; P < 0.05) for measures of executive function. Among participants with T1D, prevalent cognitive impairment was related to 14-year average A1c >7.5% (58 mmol/mol) (odds ratio [OR] 3.0; P = 0.009), proliferative retinopathy (OR 2.8; P = 0.01), and distal symmetric polyneuropathy (OR 2.6; P = 0.03) measured 5 years earlier; higher BMI (OR 1.1; P = 0.03); and ankle-brachial index ≥1.3 (OR 4.2; P = 0.01) measured 20 years earlier, independent of education.”

“Having T1D was the only factor significantly associated with the between-group difference in clinically relevant cognitive impairment in our sample. Traditional risk factors for age-related cognitive impairment, in particular older age and high blood pressure (24), were not related to the between-group difference we observed. […] Similar to previous studies of younger adults with T1D (14,26), we found no relationship between the number of severe hypoglycemic episodes and cognitive impairment. Rather, we found that chronic hyperglycemia, via its associated vascular and metabolic changes, may have triggered structural changes in the brain that disrupt normal cognitive function.”

Just to be absolutely clear about these results: The type 1 diabetics they recruited in this study were on average not yet fifty years old, yet more than one in four of them were cognitively impaired to a clinically relevant degree. This is a huge effect. As they note later in the paper:

“Unlike previous reports of mild/modest cognitive dysfunction in young adults with T1D (1,2), we detected clinically relevant cognitive impairment in 28% of our middle-aged participants with T1D. This prevalence rate in our T1D cohort is comparable to the prevalence of mild cognitive impairment typically reported among community-dwelling adults aged 85 years and older (29%) (20).”

The type 1 diabetics included in the study had had diabetes for roughly a decade more than I have. And the number of cognitively impaired individuals in that sample corresponds roughly to what you find when you test random 85+ year-olds. Having type 1 diabetes is not good for your brain.

ii. Comment on Nunley et al. Clinically Relevant Cognitive Impairment in Middle-Aged Adults With Childhood-Onset Type 1 Diabetes.

This one is a short comment to the above paper, below I’ve quoted ‘the meat’ of the comment:

“While the […] study provides us with important insights regarding cognitive impairment in adults with type 1 diabetes, we regret that depression has not been taken into account. A systematic review and meta-analysis published in 2014 identified significant objective cognitive impairment in adults and adolescents with depression regarding executive functioning, memory, and attention relative to control subjects (2). Moreover, depression is two times more common in adults with diabetes compared with those without this condition, regardless of type of diabetes (3). There is even evidence that the co-occurrence of diabetes and depression leads to additional health risks such as increased mortality and dementia (3,4); this might well apply to cognitive impairment as well. Furthermore, in people with diabetes, the presence of depression has been associated with the development of diabetes complications, such as retinopathy, and higher HbA1c values (3). These are exactly the diabetes-specific correlates that Nunley et al. (1) found.”

“We believe it is a missed opportunity that Nunley et al. (1) mainly focused on biological variables, such as hyperglycemia and microvascular disease, and did not take into account an emotional disorder widely represented among people with diabetes and closely linked to cognitive impairment. Even though severe or chronic cases of depression are likely to have been excluded in the group without type 1 diabetes based on exclusion criteria (1), data on the presence of depression (either measured through a diagnostic interview or by using a validated screening questionnaire) could have helped to interpret the present findings. […] Determining the role of depression in the relationship between cognitive impairment and type 1 diabetes is of significant importance. Treatment of depression might improve cognitive impairment both directly by alleviating cognitive depression symptoms and indirectly by improving treatment nonadherence and glycemic control, consequently lowering the risk of developing complications.”

iii. Prevalence of Diabetes and Diabetic Nephropathy in a Large U.S. Commercially Insured Pediatric Population, 2002–2013.

“[W]e identified 96,171 pediatric patients with diabetes and 3,161 pediatric patients with diabetic nephropathy during 2002–2013. We estimated prevalence of pediatric diabetes overall, by diabetes type, age, and sex, and prevalence of pediatric diabetic nephropathy overall, by age, sex, and diabetes type.”

“Although type 1 diabetes accounts for a majority of childhood and adolescent diabetes, type 2 diabetes is becoming more common with the increasing rate of childhood obesity and it is estimated that up to 45% of all new patients with diabetes in this age-group have type 2 diabetes (1,2). With the rising prevalence of diabetes in children, a rise in diabetes-related complications, such as nephropathy, is anticipated. Moreover, data suggest that the development of clinical macrovascular complications, neuropathy, and nephropathy may be especially rapid among patients with young-onset type 2 diabetes (age of onset <40 years) (36). However, the natural history of young patients with type 2 diabetes and resulting complications has not been well studied.”

I’m always interested in the identification mechanisms applied in papers like this one, and I’m a little confused about the high number of patients without prescriptions (almost one-third of patients); I sort of assume these patients do take (/are given) prescription drugs, but get them from sources not available to the researchers (parents get prescriptions for the antidiabetic drugs, and the researchers don’t have access to these data? Something like this..) but this is a bit unclear. The mechanism they employ in the paper is not perfect (no mechanism is), but it probably works:

“Patients who had one or more prescription(s) for insulin and no prescriptions for another antidiabetes medication were classified as having type 1 diabetes, while those who filled prescriptions for noninsulin antidiabetes medications were considered to have type 2 diabetes.”

When covering limitations of the paper, they observe incidentally in this context that:

“Klingensmith et al. (31) recently reported that in the initial month after diagnosis of type 2 diabetes around 30% of patients were treated with insulin only. Thus, we may have misclassified a small proportion of type 2 cases as type 1 diabetes or vice versa. Despite this, we found that 9% of patients had onset of type 2 diabetes at age <10 years, consistent with the findings of Klingensmith et al. (8%), but higher than reported by the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study (<3%) (31,32).”

Some more observations from the paper:

“There were 149,223 patients aged <18 years at first diagnosis of diabetes in the CCE database from 2002 through 2013. […] Type 1 diabetes accounted for a majority of the pediatric patients with diabetes (79%). Among these, 53% were male and 53% were aged 12 to <18 years at onset, while among patients with type 2 diabetes, 60% were female and 79% were aged 12 to <18 years at onset.”

“The overall annual prevalence of all diabetes increased from 1.86 to 2.82 per 1,000 during years 2002–2013; it increased on average by 9.5% per year from 2002 to 2006 and slowly increased by 0.6% after that […] The prevalence of type 1 diabetes increased from 1.48 to 2.32 per 1,000 during the study period (average increase of 8.5% per year from 2002 to 2006 and 1.4% after that; both P values <0.05). The prevalence of type 2 diabetes increased from 0.38 to 0.67 per 1,000 during 2002 through 2006 (average increase of 13.3% per year; P < 0.05) and then dropped from 0.56 to 0.49 per 1,000 during 2007 through 2013 (average decrease of 2.7% per year; P < 0.05). […] Prevalence of any diabetes increased by age, with the highest prevalence in patients aged 12 to <18 years (ranging from 3.47 to 5.71 per 1,000 from 2002 through 2013).” […] The annual prevalence of diabetes increased over the study period mainly because of increases in type 1 diabetes.”

“Dabelea et al. (8) reported, based on data from the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study, that the annual prevalence of type 1 diabetes increased from 1.48 to 1.93 per 1,000 and from 0.34 to 0.46 per 1,000 for type 2 diabetes from 2001 to 2009 in U.S. youth. In our study, the annual prevalence of type 1 diabetes was 1.48 per 1,000 in 2002 and 2.10 per 1,000 in 2009, which is close to their reported prevalence.”

“We identified 3,161 diabetic nephropathy cases. Among these, 1,509 cases (47.7%) were of specific diabetic nephropathy and 2,253 (71.3%) were classified as probable cases. […] The annual prevalence of diabetic nephropathy in pediatric patients with diabetes increased from 1.16 to 3.44% between 2002 and 2013; it increased by on average 25.7% per year from 2002 to 2005 and slowly increased by 4.6% after that (both P values <0.05).”

Do note that the relationship between nephropathy prevalence and diabetes prevalence is complicated and that you cannot just explain an increase in the prevalence of nephropathy over time easily by simply referring to an increased prevalence of diabetes during the same time period. This would in fact be a very wrong thing to do, in part but not only on account of the data structure employed in this study. One problem which is probably easy to understand is that if more children got diabetes but the same proportion of those new diabetics got nephropathy, the diabetes prevalence would go up but the diabetic nephropathy prevalence would remain fixed; when you calculate the diabetic nephropathy prevalence you implicitly condition on diabetes status. But this just scratches the surface of the issues you encounter when you try to link these variables, because the relationship between the two variables is complicated; there’s an age pattern to diabetes risk, with risk (incidence) increasing with age (up to a point, after which it falls – in most samples I’ve seen in the past peak incidence in pediatric populations is well below the age of 18). However diabetes prevalence increases monotonously with age as long as the age-specific death rate of diabetics is lower than the age-specific incidence, because diabetes is chronic, and then on top of that you have nephropathy-related variables, which display diabetes-related duration-dependence (meaning that although nephropathy risk is also increasing with age when you look at that variable in isolation, that age-risk relationship is confounded by diabetes duration – a type 1 diabetic at the age of 12 who’s had diabetes for 10 years has a higher risk of nephropathy than a 16-year old who developed diabetes the year before). When a newly diagnosed pediatric patient is included in the diabetes sample here this will actually decrease the nephropathy prevalence in the short run, but not in the long run, assuming no changes in diabetes treatment outcomes over time. This is because the probability that that individual has diabetes-related kidney problems as a newly diagnosed child is zero, so he or she will unquestionably only contribute to the denominator during the first years of illness (the situation in the middle-aged type 2 context is different; here you do sometimes have newly-diagnosed patients who have developed complications already). This is one reason why it would be quite wrong to say that increased diabetes prevalence in this sample is the reason why diabetic nephropathy is increasing as well. Unless the time period you look at is very long (e.g. you have a setting where you follow all individuals with a diagnosis until the age of 18), the impact of increasing prevalence of one condition may well be expected to have a negative impact on the estimated risk of associated conditions, if those associated conditions display duration-dependence (which all major diabetes complications do). A second factor supporting a default assumption of increasing incidence of diabetes leading to an expected decreasing rate of diabetes-related complications is of course the fact that treatment options have tended to increase over time, and especially if you take a long view (look back 30-40 years) the increase in treatment options and improved medical technology have lead to improved metabolic control and better outcomes.

That both variables grew over time might be taken to indicate that both more children got diabetes and that a larger proportion of this increased number of children with diabetes developed kidney problems, but this stuff is a lot more complicated than it might look and it’s in particular important to keep in mind that, say, the 2005 sample and the 2010 sample do not include the same individuals, although there’ll of course be some overlap; in age-stratified samples like this you always have some level of implicit continuous replacement, with newly diagnosed patients entering and replacing the 18-year olds who leave the sample. As long as prevalence is constant over time, associated outcome variables may be reasonably easy to interpret, but when you have dynamic samples as well as increasing prevalence over time it gets difficult to say much with any degree of certainty unless you crunch the numbers in a lot of detail (and it might be difficult even if you do that). A factor I didn’t mention above but which is of course also relevant is that you need to be careful about how to interpret prevalence rates when you look at complications with high mortality rates (and late-stage diabetic nephropathy is indeed a complication with high mortality); in such a situation improvements in treatment outcomes may have large effects on prevalence rates but no effect on incidence. Increased prevalence is not always bad news, sometimes it is good news indeed. Gleevec substantially increased the prevalence of CML.

In terms of the prevalence-outcomes (/complication risk) connection, there are also in my opinion reasons to assume that there may be multiple causal pathways between prevalence and outcomes. For example a very low prevalence of a condition in a given area may mean that fewer specialists are educated to take care of these patients than would be the case for an area with a higher prevalence, and this may translate into a more poorly developed care infrastructure. Greatly increasing prevalence may on the other hand lead to a lower level of care for all patients with the illness, not just the newly diagnosed ones, due to binding budget constraints and care rationing. And why might you have changes in prevalence; might they not sometimes rather be related to changes in diagnostic practices, rather than changes in the True* prevalence? If that’s the case, you might not be comparing apples to apples when you’re comparing the evolving complication rates. There are in my opinion many reasons to believe that the relationship between chronic conditions and the complication rates of these conditions is far from simple to model.

All this said, kidney problems in children with diabetes is still rare, compared to the numbers you see when you look at adult samples with longer diabetes duration. It’s also worth distinguishing between microalbuminuria and overt nephropathy; children rarely proceed to develop diabetes-related kidney failure, although poor metabolic control may mean that they do develop this complication later, in early adulthood. As they note in the paper:

“It has been reported that overt diabetic nephropathy and kidney failure caused by either type 1 or type 2 diabetes are uncommon during childhood or adolescence (24). In this study, the annual prevalence of diabetic nephropathy for all cases ranged from 1.16 to 3.44% in pediatric patients with diabetes and was extremely low in the whole pediatric population (range 2.15 to 9.70 per 100,000), confirming that diabetic nephropathy is a very uncommon condition in youth aged <18 years. We observed that the prevalence of diabetic nephropathy increased in both specific and unspecific cases before 2006, with a leveling off of the specific nephropathy cases after 2005, while the unspecific cases continued to increase.”

iv. Adherence to Oral Glucose-Lowering Therapies and Associations With 1-Year HbA1c: A Retrospective Cohort Analysis in a Large Primary Care Database.

“Between a third and a half of medicines prescribed for type 2 diabetes (T2DM), a condition in which multiple medications are used to control cardiovascular risk factors and blood glucose (1,2), are not taken as prescribed (36). However, estimates vary widely depending on the population being studied and the way in which adherence to recommended treatment is defined.”

“A number of previous studies have used retrospective databases of electronic health records to examine factors that might predict adherence. A recent large cohort database examined overall adherence to oral therapy for T2DM, taking into account changes of therapy. It concluded that overall adherence was 69%, with individuals newly started on treatment being significantly less likely to adhere (19).”

“The impact of continuing to take glucose-lowering medicines intermittently, but not as recommended, is unknown. Medication possession (expressed as a ratio of actual possession to expected possession), derived from prescribing records, has been identified as a valid adherence measure for people with diabetes (7). Previous studies have been limited to small populations in managed-care systems in the U.S. and focused on metformin and sulfonylurea oral glucose-lowering treatments (8,9). Further studies need to be carried out in larger groups of people that are more representative of the general population.

The Clinical Practice Research Database (CPRD) is a long established repository of routine clinical data from more than 13 million patients registered with primary care services in England. […] The Genetics of Diabetes and Audit Research Tayside Study (GoDARTS) database is derived from integrated health records in Scotland with primary care, pharmacy, and hospital data on 9,400 patients with diabetes. […] We conducted a retrospective cohort study using [these databases] to examine the prevalence of nonadherence to treatment for type 2 diabetes and investigate its potential impact on HbA1c reduction stratified by type of glucose-lowering medication.”

“In CPRD and GoDARTS, 13% and 15% of patients, respectively, were nonadherent. Proportions of nonadherent patients varied by the oral glucose-lowering treatment prescribed (range 8.6% [thiazolidinedione] to 18.8% [metformin]). Nonadherent, compared with adherent, patients had a smaller HbA1c reduction (0.4% [4.4 mmol/mol] and 0.46% [5.0 mmol/mol] for CPRD and GoDARTs, respectively). Difference in HbA1c response for adherent compared with nonadherent patients varied by drug (range 0.38% [4.1 mmol/mol] to 0.75% [8.2 mmol/mol] lower in adherent group). Decreasing levels of adherence were consistently associated with a smaller reduction in HbA1c.”

“These findings show an association between adherence to oral glucose-lowering treatment, measured by the proportion of medication obtained on prescription over 1 year, and the corresponding decrement in HbA1c, in a population of patients newly starting treatment and continuing to collect prescriptions. The association is consistent across all commonly used oral glucose-lowering therapies, and the findings are consistent between the two data sets examined, CPRD and GoDARTS. Nonadherent patients, taking on average <80% of the intended medication, had about half the expected reduction in HbA1c. […] Reduced medication adherence for commonly used glucose-lowering therapies among patients persisting with treatment is associated with smaller HbA1c reductions compared with those taking treatment as recommended. Differences observed in HbA1c responses to glucose-lowering treatments may be explained in part by their intermittent use.”

“Low medication adherence is related to increased mortality (20). The mean difference in HbA1c between patients with MPR <80% and ≥80% is between 0.37% and 0.55% (4 mmol/mol and 6 mmol/mol), equivalent to up to a 10% reduction in death or an 18% reduction in diabetes complications (21).”

v. Health Care Transition in Young Adults With Type 1 Diabetes: Perspectives of Adult Endocrinologists in the U.S.

“Empiric data are limited on best practices in transition care, especially in the U.S. (10,1316). Prior research, largely from the patient perspective, has highlighted challenges in the transition process, including gaps in care (13,1719); suboptimal pediatric transition preparation (13,20); increased post-transition hospitalizations (21); and patient dissatisfaction with the transition experience (13,1719). […] Young adults with type 1 diabetes transitioning from pediatric to adult care are at risk for adverse outcomes. Our objective was to describe experiences, resources, and barriers reported by a national sample of adult endocrinologists receiving and caring for young adults with type 1 diabetes.”

“We received responses from 536 of 4,214 endocrinologists (response rate 13%); 418 surveys met the eligibility criteria. Respondents (57% male, 79% Caucasian) represented 47 states; 64% had been practicing >10 years and 42% worked at an academic center. Only 36% of respondents reported often/always reviewing pediatric records and 11% reported receiving summaries for transitioning young adults with type 1 diabetes, although >70% felt that these activities were important for patient care.”

“A number of studies document deficiencies in provider hand-offs across other chronic conditions and point to the broader relevance of our findings. For example, in two studies of inflammatory bowel disease, adult gastroenterologists reported inadequacies in young adult transition preparation (31) and infrequent receipt of medical histories from pediatric providers (32). In a study of adult specialists caring for young adults with a variety of chronic diseases (33), more than half reported that they had no contact with the pediatric specialists.

Importantly, more than half of the endocrinologists in our study reported a need for increased access to mental health referrals for young adult patients with type 1 diabetes, particularly in nonacademic settings. Report of barriers to care was highest for patient scenarios involving mental health issues, and endocrinologists without easy access to mental health referrals were significantly more likely to report barriers to diabetes management for young adults with psychiatric comorbidities such as depression, substance abuse, and eating disorders.”

“Prior research (34,35) has uncovered the lack of mental health resources in diabetes care. In the large cross-national Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN) study (36) […] diabetes providers often reported not having the resources to manage mental health problems; half of specialist diabetes physicians felt unable to provide psychiatric support for patients and one-third did not have ready access to outside expertise in emotional or psychiatric matters. Our results, which resonate with the DAWN findings, are particularly concerning in light of the vulnerability of young adults with type 1 diabetes for adverse medical and mental health outcomes (4,34,37,38). […] In a recent report from the Mental Health Issues of Diabetes conference (35), which focused on type 1 diabetes, a major observation included the lack of trained mental health professionals, both in academic centers and the community, who are knowledgeable about the mental health issues germane to diabetes.”

August 3, 2017 Posted by | Diabetes, Epidemiology, Medicine, Nephrology, Neurology, Pharmacology, Psychiatry, Psychology, Statistics, Studies | Leave a comment

Neurology Grand Rounds – Typical and Atypical Diabetic Neuropathy

The lecture is not particularly easy to follow if you’re not a neurologist, and/but I assume even neurologists might have difficulties with Liewluck’s (? the second guy’s…) contribution because that guy’s English pronunciation is not great. But if you’re the sort of person who watches neurology lectures online it’s well worth watching.

Said noted in his book on these topics that: “In general pharmacological treatments will not cause anywhere near complete pain relief: “For patients receiving pharmacological treatment, the average pain reduction is about 20-30%, and only 20-35% of patients will achieve at least a 50% pain reduction with available drugs. […] often only partial pain relief from neuropathic pain can be expected, and […] sensory deficits are unlikely to respond to treatment.” Treatment of neuropathic pain is often a trial-and-error process.”

These guys make an even stronger point than Said did: Diabetics who develop painful neuropathies do not get rid of the pain even with treatment – the pain can be managed, but it’s permanent in (…almost? …a few young type 1 diabetics, maybe? But the 60-year old neurologist had never encountered one of those, so odds are against you being one of the lucky ones…) every single case. This of course has some consequences for how patients should be managed – for example you want to devote some time and effort to managing expectations, so people don’t get/have unrealistic ideas about what the treatments which are available may actually accomplish. Another aspect related to this is which sort of treatment options to consider in such a setting, as also noted in the lecture – tolerance development is for example an easily foreseeable problem with opiate treatment which is likely to cause problems down the line if not addressed (but as I pointed out a few years ago, my impression is that: “‘it may not work particularly well in the long run, and there are a lot of side-effects’ is a better argument against [chronic opioid treatment] than the potential for addiction”).

June 23, 2017 Posted by | Diabetes, Lectures, Medicine, Neurology, Pharmacology | Leave a comment

A few papers

i. To Conform or to Maintain Self-Consistency? Hikikomori Risk in Japan and the Deviation From Seeking Harmony.

A couple of data points and observations from the paper:

“There is an increasing number of youth in Japan who are dropping out of society and isolating themselves in their bedrooms from years to decades at a time. According to Japan’s Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare’s first official 2003 guidelines on this culture-bound syndrome, hikikomori (social isolation syndrome) has the following specific diagnostic criteria: (1) no motivation to participate in school or work; (2) no signs of schizophrenia or any other known psychopathologies; and (3) persistence of social withdrawal for at least six months.”

“One obvious dilemma in studying hikikomori is that most of those suffering from hikikomori, by definition, do not seek treatment. More importantly, social isolation itself is not even a symptom of any of the DSM diagnosis often assigned to an individual afflicted with hikikomori […] The motivation for isolating oneself among a hikikomori is simply to avoid possible social interactions with others who might know or judge them (Zielenziger, 2006).”

“Saito’s (2010) and Sakai and colleagues’ (2011) data suggest that 10% to 15% of the hikikomori population suffer from an autism spectrum disorder. […] in the first epidemiological study conducted on hikikomori that was as close to a nation-wide random sample as possible, Koyama and colleagues (2010) conducted a face-to-face household survey, including a structured diagnostic interview, by randomly picking households and interviewing 4,134 individuals. They confirmed a hikikomori lifetime prevalence rate of 1.2% in their nationwide sample. Among these hikikomori individuals, the researchers found that only half suffered from a DSM-IV diagnosis. However, and more importantly, there was no particular diagnosis that was systematically associated with hikikomori. […] the researchers concluded that any DSM diagnosis was an epiphenomenon to hikikomori at best and that hikikomori is rather a “psychopathology characterized by impaired motivation” p. 72).”

ii. Does the ‘hikikomori’ syndrome of social withdrawal exist outside Japan?: A preliminary international investigation.

Purpose

To explore whether the ‘hikikomori’ syndrome (social withdrawal) described in Japan exists in other countries, and if so, how patients with the syndrome are diagnosed and treated.

Methods

Two hikikomori case vignettes were sent to psychiatrists in Australia, Bangladesh, India, Iran, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Thailand and the USA. Participants rated the syndrome’s prevalence in their country, etiology, diagnosis, suicide risk, and treatment.

Results

Out of 247 responses to the questionnaire (123 from Japan and 124 from other countries), 239 were enrolled in the analysis. Respondents’ felt the hikikomori syndrome is seen in all countries examined and especially in urban areas. Biopsychosocial, cultural, and environmental factors were all listed as probable causes of hikikomori, and differences among countries were not significant. Japanese psychiatrists suggested treatment in outpatient wards and some did not think that psychiatric treatment is necessary. Psychiatrists in other countries opted for more active treatment such as hospitalization.

Conclusions

Patients with the hikikomori syndrome are perceived as occurring across a variety of cultures by psychiatrists in multiple countries. Our results provide a rational basis for study of the existence and epidemiology of hikikomori in clinical or community populations in international settings.”

“Our results extend rather than clarify the debate over diagnosis of hikikomori. In our survey, a variety of diagnoses, such as psychosis, depression anxiety and personality disorders, were proffered. Opinions as to whether hikikomori cases can be diagnosed using ICD-10/DSV-IV criteria differed depending on the participants’ countries and the cases’ age of onset. […] a recent epidemiological survey in Japan reported approximately a fifty-fifty split between hikikomori who had experienced a psychiatric disorder and had not [14]. These data and other studies that have not been able to diagnose all cases of hikikomori may suggest the existence of ‘primary hikikomori’ that is not an expression of any other psychiatric disorder [28,8,9,5,29]. In order to clarify differences between ‘primary hikikomori’ (social withdrawal not associated with any underlying psychiatric disorder) and ‘secondary hikikomori’ (social withdrawal caused by an established psychiatric disorder), further epidemiological and psychopathological studies are needed. […] Even if all hikikomori cases prove to be within some kind of psychiatric disorders, it is valuable to continue to focus on the hikikomori phenomenon because of its associated morbidity, similar to how suicidality is examined in various fields of psychiatry [30]. Reducing the burden of hikikomori symptoms, regardless of what psychiatric disorders patients may have, may provide a worthwhile improvement in their quality of life, and this suggests another direction of future hikikomori research.”

“Our case vignette survey indicates that the hikikomori syndrome, previously thought to exist only in Japan, is perceived by psychiatrists to exist in many other countries. It is particularly perceived as occurring in urban areas and might be associated with rapid global sociocultural changes. There is no consensus among psychiatrists within or across countries about the causes, diagnosis and therapeutic interventions for hikikomori yet.”

iii. Hikikomori: clinical and psychopathological issues (review). A poor paper, but it did have a little bit of data of interest:

“The prevalence of hikikomori is difficult to assess […]. In Japan, more than one million cases have been estimated by experts, but there is no population-based study to confirm these data (9). […] In 2008, Kiyota et al. summarized 3 population-based studies involving 12 cities and 3951 subjects, highlighting that a percentage comprised between 0.9% and 3.8% of the sample had an hikikomori history in anamnesis (11). The typical hikikomori patient is male (4:1 male-to-female ratio) […] females constitute a minor fraction of the reported cases, and usually their period of social isolation is limited.”

iv. Interpreting results of ethanol analysis in postmortem specimens: A review of the literature.

A few observations from the paper:

“A person’s blood-alcohol concentration (BAC) and state of inebriation at the time of death is not always easy to establish owing to various postmortem artifacts. The possibility of alcohol being produced in the body after death, e.g. via microbial contamination and fermentation is a recurring issue in routine casework. If ethanol remains unabsorbed in the stomach at the time of death, this raises the possibility of continued local diffusion into surrounding tissues and central blood after death. Skull trauma often renders a person unconscious for several hours before death, during which time the BAC continues to decrease owing to metabolism in the liver. Under these circumstances blood from an intracerebral or subdural clot is a useful specimen for determination of ethanol. Bodies recovered from water are particular problematic to deal with owing to possible dilution of body fluids, decomposition, and enhanced risk of microbial synthesis of ethanol. […] Alcoholics often die at home with zero or low BAC and nothing more remarkable at autopsy than a fatty liver. Increasing evidence suggests that such deaths might be caused by a pronounced ketoacidosis.”

“The concentrations of ethanol measured in blood drawn from different sampling sites tend to vary much more than expected from inherent variations in the analytical methods used [49]. Studies have shown that concentrations of ethanol and other drugs determined in heart blood are generally higher than in blood from a peripheral vein although in any individual case there are likely to be considerable variations [50–53].”

“The BAC necessary to cause death is often an open question and much depends on the person’s age, drinking experience and degree of tolerance development [78]. The speed of drinking plays a role in alcohol toxicity as does the kind of beverage consumed […] Drunkenness and hypothermia represent a dangerous combination and deaths tend to occur at a lower BAC when people are exposed to cold, such as, when an alcoholic sleeps outdoors in the winter months [78]. Drinking large amounts of alcohol to produce stupor and unconsciousness combined with positional asphyxia or inhalation of vomit are common causes of death in intoxicated individuals who die of suffocation [81–83]. The toxicity of ethanol is often considerably enhanced by the concomitant use of other drugs with their site of action in the brain, especially opiates, propoxyphene, antidepressants and some sedative hypnotics [84]. […] It seems reasonable to assume that the BAC at autopsy will almost always be lower than the maximum BAC reached during a drinking binge, owing to metabolism of ethanol taking place up until the moment of death [85–87]. During the time after discontinuation of drinking until death, the BAC might decrease appreciably depending on the speed of alcohol elimination from blood, which in heavy drinkers could exceed 20 or 30 mg/100 mL per h (0.02 or 0.03 g% per h) [88].”

“When the supply of oxygen to the body ends, the integrity of cell membranes and tissue compartments gradually disintegrate through the action of various digestive enzymes. This reflects the process of autolysis (self digestion) resulting in a softening and liquefaction of the tissue (freezing the body prevents autolysis). During this process, bacteria from the bowel invade the surrounding tissue and vascular system and the rate of infiltration depends on many factors including the ambient temperature, position of the body and whether death was caused by bacterial infection. Glucose concentrations increase in blood after death and this sugar is probably the simplest substrate for microbial synthesis of ethanol [20,68]. […] Extensive trauma to a body […] increases the potential for spread of bacteria and heightens the risk of ethanol production after death [217]. Blood-ethanol concentrations as high as 190 mg/100 mL have been reported in postmortem blood after particularly traumatic events such as explosions and when no evidence existed to support ingestion of ethanol before the disaster [218].”

v. Interventions based on the Theory of Mind cognitive model for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) (Cochrane review).

“The ‘Theory of Mind’ (ToM) model suggests that people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have a profound difficulty understanding the minds of other people – their emotions, feelings, beliefs, and thoughts. As an explanation for some of the characteristic social and communication behaviours of people with ASD, this model has had a significant influence on research and practice. It implies that successful interventions to teach ToM could, in turn, have far-reaching effects on behaviours and outcome.”

“Twenty-two randomised trials were included in the review (N = 695). Studies were highly variable in their country of origin, sample size, participant age, intervention delivery type, and outcome measures. Risk of bias was variable across categories. There were very few studies for which there was adequate blinding of participants and personnel, and some were also judged at high risk of bias in blinding of outcome assessors. There was also evidence of some bias in sequence generation and allocation concealment.”

“Studies were grouped into four main categories according to intervention target/primary outcome measure. These were: emotion recognition studies, joint attention and social communication studies, imitation studies, and studies teaching ToM itself. […] There was very low quality evidence of a positive effect on measures of communication based on individual results from three studies. There was low quality evidence from 11 studies reporting mixed results of interventions on measures of social interaction, very low quality evidence from four studies reporting mixed results on measures of general communication, and very low quality evidence from four studies reporting mixed results on measures of ToM ability. […] While there is some evidence that ToM, or a precursor skill, can be taught to people with ASD, there is little evidence of maintenance of that skill, generalisation to other settings, or developmental effects on related skills. Furthermore, inconsistency in findings and measurement means that evidence has been graded of ‘very low’ or ‘low’ quality and we cannot be confident that suggestions of positive effects will be sustained as high-quality evidence accumulates. Further longitudinal designs and larger samples are needed to help elucidate both the efficacy of ToM-linked interventions and the explanatory value of the ToM model itself.”

vi. Risk of Psychiatric and Neurodevelopmental Disorders Among Siblings of Probands With Autism Spectrum Disorders.

“The Finnish Prenatal Study of Autism and Autism Spectrum Disorders used a population-based cohort that included children born from January 1, 1987, to December 31, 2005, who received a diagnosis of ASD by December 31, 2007. Each case was individually matched to 4 control participants by sex and date and place of birth. […] Among the 3578 cases with ASD (2841 boys [79.4%]) and 11 775 controls (9345 boys [79.4%]), 1319 cases (36.9%) and 2052 controls (17.4%) had at least 1 sibling diagnosed with any psychiatric or neurodevelopmental disorder (adjusted RR, 2.5; 95% CI, 2.3-2.6).”

Conclusions and Relevance Psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders cluster among siblings of probands with ASD. For etiologic research, these findings provide further evidence that several psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders have common risk factors.”

vii. Treatment for epilepsy in pregnancy: neurodevelopmental outcomes in the child (Cochrane review).

“Accumulating evidence suggests an association between prenatal exposure to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and increased risk of both physical anomalies and neurodevelopmental impairment. Neurodevelopmental impairment is characterised by either a specific deficit or a constellation of deficits across cognitive, motor and social skills and can be transient or continuous into adulthood. It is of paramount importance that these potential risks are identified, minimised and communicated clearly to women with epilepsy.”

“Twenty-two prospective cohort studies were included and six registry based studies. Study quality varied. […] the IQ of children exposed to VPA [sodium valproate] (n = 112) was significantly lower than for those exposed to CBZ [carbamazepine] (n = 191) (MD [mean difference] 8.69, 95% CI 5.51 to 11.87, P < 0.00001). […] IQ was significantly lower for children exposed to VPA (n = 74) versus LTG [lamotrigine] (n = 84) (MD -10.80, 95% CI -14.42 to -7.17, P < 0.00001). DQ [developmental quotient] was higher in children exposed to PHT (n = 80) versus VPA (n = 108) (MD 7.04, 95% CI 0.44 to 13.65, P = 0.04). Similarly IQ was higher in children exposed to PHT (n = 45) versus VPA (n = 61) (MD 9.25, 95% CI 4.78 to 13.72, P < 0.0001). A dose effect for VPA was reported in six studies, with higher doses (800 to 1000 mg daily or above) associated with a poorer cognitive outcome in the child. We identified no convincing evidence of a dose effect for CBZ, PHT or LTG. Studies not included in the meta-analysis were reported narratively, the majority of which supported the findings of the meta-analyses.”

“The most important finding is the reduction in IQ in the VPA exposed group, which are sufficient to affect education and occupational outcomes in later life. However, for some women VPA is the most effective drug at controlling seizures. Informed treatment decisions require detailed counselling about these risks at treatment initiation and at pre-conceptual counselling. We have insufficient data about newer AEDs, some of which are commonly prescribed, and further research is required. Most women with epilepsy should continue their medication during pregnancy as uncontrolled seizures also carries a maternal risk.”

Do take note of the effect sizes reported here. To take an example, the difference between being treated with valproate and lamotrigine might equal 10 IQ points in the child – these are huge effects.

June 11, 2017 Posted by | Medicine, Neurology, Pharmacology, Psychiatry, Psychology, Studies | Leave a comment

A few diabetes papers of interest

i. Cost-Effectiveness of Prevention and Treatment of the Diabetic Foot.

“A risk-based Markov model was developed to simulate the onset and progression of diabetic foot disease in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes managed with care according to guidelines for their lifetime. Mean survival time, quality of life, foot complications, and costs were the outcome measures assessed. Current care was the reference comparison. Data from Dutch studies on the epidemiology of diabetic foot disease, health care use, and costs, complemented with information from international studies, were used to feed the model.

RESULTS—Compared with current care, guideline-based care resulted in improved life expectancy, gain of quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), and reduced incidence of foot complications. The lifetime costs of management of the diabetic foot following guideline-based care resulted in a cost per QALY gained of <$25,000, even for levels of preventive foot care as low as 10%. The cost-effectiveness varied sharply, depending on the level of foot ulcer reduction attained.

CONCLUSIONS—Management of the diabetic foot according to guideline-based care improves survival, reduces diabetic foot complications, and is cost-effective and even cost saving compared with standard care.”

I won’t go too deeply into the model setup and the results but some of the data they used to feed the model were actually somewhat interesting in their own right, and I have added some of these data below, along with some of the model results.

“It is estimated that 80% of LEAs [lower extremity amputations] are preceded by foot ulcers. Accordingly, it has been demonstrated that preventing the development of foot ulcers in patients with diabetes reduces the frequency of LEAs by 49–85% (6).”

“An annual ulcer incidence rate of 2.1% and an amputation incidence rate of 0.6% were among the reference country-specific parameters derived from this study and adopted in the model.”

“The health outcomes results of the cohort following standard care were comparable to figures reported for diabetic patients in the Netherlands. […] In the 10,000 patients followed until death, a total of 1,780 ulcer episodes occurred, corresponding to a cumulative ulcer incidence of 17.8% and an annual ulcer incidence of 2.2% (mean annual ulcer incidence for the Netherlands is 2.1%) (17). The number of amputations observed was 362 (250 major and 112 minor), corresponding to a cumulative incidence of 3.6% and an annual incidence of 0.4% (mean annual amputation incidence reported for the Netherlands is 0.6%) (17).”

“Cornerstones of guidelines-based care are intensive glycemic control (IGC) and optimal foot care (OFC). Although health benefits and economic efficiency of intensive blood glucose control (8) and foot care programs (914) have been individually reported, the health and economic outcomes and the cost-effectiveness of both interventions have not been determined. […] OFC according to guidelines includes professional protective foot care, education of patients and staff, regular inspection of the feet, identification of the high-risk patient, treatment of nonulcerative lesions, and a multidisciplinary approach to established foot ulcers. […] All cohorts of patients simulated for the different scenarios of guidelines care resulted in improved life expectancy, QALYs gained, and reduced incidence of foot ulcers and LEA compared with standard care. The largest effects on these outcomes were obtained when patients received IGC + OFC. When comparing the independent health effects of the two guidelines strategies, OFC resulted in a greater reduction in ulcer and amputation rates than IGC. Moreover, patients who received IGC + OFC showed approximately the same LEA incidence as patients who received OFC alone. The LEA decrease obtained was proportional to the level of foot ulcer reduction attained.”

“The mean total lifetime costs of a patient under either of the three guidelines care scenarios ranged from $4,088 to $4,386. For patients receiving IGC + OFC, these costs resulted in <$25,000 per QALY gained (relative to standard care). For patients receiving IGC alone, the ICER [here’s a relevant link – US] obtained was $32,057 per QALY gained, and for those receiving OFC alone, this ICER ranged from $12,169 to $220,100 per QALY gained, depending on the level of ulcer reduction attained. […] Increasing the effectiveness of preventive foot care in patients under OFC and IGC + OFC resulted in more QALYs gained, lower costs, and a more favorable ICER. The results of the simulations for the combined scenario (IGC + OFC) were rather insensitive to changes in utility weights and costing parameters. Similar results were obtained for parameter variations in the other two scenarios (IGC and OFC separately).”

“The results of this study suggest that IGC + OFC reduces foot ulcers and amputations and leads to an improvement in life expectancy. Greater health benefits are obtained with higher levels of foot ulcer prevention. Although care according to guidelines increases health costs, the cost per QALY gained is <$25,000, even for levels of preventive foot care as low as 10%. ICERs of this order are cost-effective according to the stratification of interventions for diabetes recently proposed (32). […] IGC falls into the category of a possibly cost-effective intervention in the management of the diabetic foot. Although it does not produce significant reduction in foot ulcers and LEA, its effectiveness resides in the slowing of neuropathy progression rates.

Extrapolating our results to a practical situation, if IGC + OFC was to be given to all diabetic patients in the Netherlands, with the aim of reducing LEA by 50% (St. Vincent’s declaration), the cost per QALY gained would be $12,165 and the cost for managing diabetic ulcers and amputations would decrease by 53 and 58%, respectively. From a policy perspective, this is clearly cost-effective and cost saving compared with current care.”

ii. Early Glycemic Control, Age at Onset, and Development of Microvascular Complications in Childhood-Onset Type 1 Diabetes.

“The aim of this work was to study the impact of glycemic control (HbA1c) early in disease and age at onset on the occurrence of incipient diabetic nephropathy (MA) and background retinopathy (RP) in childhood-onset type 1 diabetes.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—All children, diagnosed at 0–14 years in a geographically defined area in northern Sweden between 1981 and 1992, were identified using the Swedish Childhood Diabetes Registry. From 1981, a nationwide childhood diabetes care program was implemented recommending intensified insulin treatment. HbA1c and urinary albumin excretion were analyzed, and fundus photography was performed regularly. Retrospective data on all 94 patients were retrieved from medical records and laboratory reports.

RESULTS—During the follow-up period, with a mean duration of 12 ± 4 years (range 5–19), 17 patients (18%) developed MA, 45 patients (48%) developed RP, and 52% had either or both complications. A Cox proportional hazard regression, modeling duration to occurrence of MA or RP, showed that glycemic control (reflected by mean HbA1c) during the follow-up was significantly associated with both MA and RP when adjusted for sex, birth weight, age at onset, and tobacco use as potential confounders. Mean HbA1c during the first 5 years of diabetes was a near-significant determinant for development of MA (hazard ratio 1.41, P = 0.083) and a significant determinant of RP (1.32, P = 0.036). The age at onset of diabetes significantly influenced the risk of developing RP (1.11, P = 0.021). Thus, in a Kaplan-Meier analysis, onset of diabetes before the age of 5 years, compared with the age-groups 5–11 and >11 years, showed a longer time to occurrence of RP (P = 0.015), but no clear tendency was seen for MA, perhaps due to lower statistical power.

CONCLUSIONS—Despite modern insulin treatment, >50% of patients with childhood-onset type 1 diabetes developed detectable diabetes complications after ∼12 years of diabetes. Inadequate glycemic control, also during the first 5 years of diabetes, seems to accelerate time to occurrence, whereas a young age at onset of diabetes seems to prolong the time to development of microvascular complications. […] The present study and other studies (15,54) indicate that children with an onset of diabetes before the age of 5 years may have a prolonged time to development of microvascular complications. Thus, the youngest age-groups, who are most sensitive to hypoglycemia with regard to risk of persistent brain damage, may have a relative protection during childhood or a longer time to development of complications.”

It’s important to note that although some people reading the study may think this is all ancient history (people diagnosed in the 80es?), to a lot of people it really isn’t. The study is of great personal interest to me, as I was diagnosed in ’87; if it had been a Danish study rather than a Swedish one I might well have been included in the analysis.

Another note to add in the context of the above coverage is that unlike what the authors of the paper seem to think/imply, hypoglycemia may not be the only relevant variable of interest in the context of the effect of childhood diabetes on brain development, where early diagnosis has been observed to tend to lead to less favourable outcomes – other variables which may be important include DKA episodes and perhaps also chronic hyperglycemia during early childhood. See this post for more stuff on these topics.

Some more stuff from the paper:

“The annual incidence of type 1 diabetes in northern Sweden in children 0–14 years of age is now ∼31/100,000. During the time period 1981–1992, there has been an increase in the annual incidence from 19 to 31/100,000 in northern Sweden. This is similar to the rest of Sweden […]. Seventeen (18%) of the 94 patients fulfilled the criteria for MA during the follow-up period. None of the patients developed overt nephropathy, elevated serum creatinine, or had signs of any other kidney disorder, e.g., hematuria, during the follow-up period. […] The mean time to diagnosis of MA was 9 ± 3 years (range 4–15) from diabetes onset. Forty-five (48%) of the 94 patients fulfilled the criteria for RP during the follow-up period. None of the patients developed proliferative retinopathy or were treated with photocoagulation. The mean time to diagnosis of RP was 11 ± 4 years (range 4–19) from onset of diabetes. Of the 45 patients with RP, 13 (29%) had concomitant MA, and thus 13 (76.5%) of the 17 patients with MA had concomitant RP. […] Altogether, among the 94 patients, 32 (34%) had isolated RP, 4 (4%) had isolated MA, and 13 (14%) had combined RP and MA. Thus, 49 (52%) patients had either one or both complications and, hence, 45 (48%) had neither of these complications.”

“When modeling MA as a function of glycemic level up to the onset of MA or during the entire follow-up period, adjusting for sex, birth weight, age at onset of diabetes, and tobacco use, only glycemic control had a significant effect. An increase in hazard ratio (HR) of 83% per one percentage unit increase in mean HbA1c was seen. […] The increase in HR of developing RP for each percentage unit rise in HbA1c during the entire follow-up period was 43% and in the early period 32%. […] Age at onset of diabetes was a weak but significant independent determinant for the development of RP in all regression models (P = 0.015, P = 0.018, and P = 0.010, respectively). […] Despite that this study was relatively small and had a retrospective design, we were able to show that the glycemic level already during the first 5 years may be an important predictor of later development of both MA and RP. This is in accordance with previous prospective follow-up studies (16,30).”

“Previously, male sex, smoking, and low birth weight have been shown to be risk factors for the development of nephropathy and retinopathy (6,4549). However, in this rather small retrospective study with a limited follow-up time, we could not confirm these associations”. This may just be because of lack of power, it’s a relatively small study. Again, this is/was of personal interest to me; two of those three risk factors apply to me, and neither of those risk factors are modifiable.

iii. Eighteen Years of Fair Glycemic Control Preserves Cardiac Autonomic Function in Type 1 Diabetes.

“Reduced cardiovascular autonomic function is associated with increased mortality in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes (14). Poor glycemic control plays an important role in the development and progression of diabetic cardiac autonomic dysfunction (57). […] Diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) can be defined as impaired function of the peripheral autonomic nervous system. Exercise intolerance, resting tachycardia, and silent myocardial ischemia may be early signs of cardiac autonomic dysfunction (9).The most frequent finding in subclinical and symptomatic CAN is reduced heart rate variability (HRV) (10). […] No other studies have followed type 1 diabetic patients on intensive insulin treatment during ≥14-year periods and documented cardiac autonomic dysfunction. We evaluated the association between 18 years’ mean HbA1c and cardiac autonomic function in a group of type 1 diabetic patients with 30 years of disease duration.”

“A total of 39 patients with type 1 diabetes were followed during 18 years, and HbA1c was measured yearly. At 18 years follow-up heart rate variability (HRV) measurements were used to assess cardiac autonomic function. Standard cardiac autonomic tests during normal breathing, deep breathing, the Valsalva maneuver, and the tilt test were performed. Maximal heart rate increase during exercise electrocardiogram and minimal heart rate during sleep were also used to describe cardiac autonomic function.

RESULTS—We present the results for patients with mean HbA1c <8.4% (two lowest HbA1c tertiles) compared with those with HbA1c ≥8.4% (highest HbA1c tertile). All of the cardiac autonomic tests were significantly different in the high- and the low-HbA1c groups, and the most favorable scores for all tests were seen in the low-HbA1c group. In the low-HbA1c group, the HRV was 40% during deep breathing, and in the high-HbA1c group, the HRV was 19.9% (P = 0.005). Minimal heart rate at night was significantly lower in the low-HbA1c groups than in the high-HbA1c group (P = 0.039). With maximal exercise, the increase in heart rate was significantly higher in the low-HbA1c group compared with the high-HbA1c group (P = 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS—Mean HbA1c during 18 years was associated with cardiac autonomic function. Cardiac autonomic function was preserved with HbA1c <8.4%, whereas cardiac autonomic dysfunction was impaired in the group with HbA1c ≥8.4%. […] The study underlines the importance of good glycemic control and demonstrates that good long-term glycemic control is associated with preserved cardiac autonomic function, whereas a lack of good glycemic control is associated with cardiac autonomic dysfunction.”

These results are from Norway (Oslo), and again they seem relevant to me personally (‘from a statistical point of view’) – I’ve had diabetes for about as long as the people they included in the study.

iv. The Mental Health Comorbidities of Diabetes.

“Individuals living with type 1 or type 2 diabetes are at increased risk for depression, anxiety, and eating disorder diagnoses. Mental health comorbidities of diabetes compromise adherence to treatment and thus increase the risk for serious short- and long-term complications […] Young adults with type 1 diabetes are especially at risk for poor physical and mental health outcomes and premature mortality. […] we summarize the prevalence and consequences of mental health problems for patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes and suggest strategies for identifying and treating patients with diabetes and mental health comorbidities.”

“Major advances in the past 2 decades have improved understanding of the biological basis for the relationship between depression and diabetes.2 A bidirectional relationship might exist between type 2 diabetes and depression: just as type 2 diabetes increases the risk for onset of major depression, a major depressive disorder signals increased risk for on set of type 2 diabetes.2 Moreover, diabetes distress is now recognized as an entity separate from major depressive disorder.2 Diabetes distress occurs because virtually all of diabetes care involves self-management behavior—requiring balance of a complex set of behavioral tasks by the person and family, 24 hours a day, without “vacation” days. […] Living with diabetes is associated with a broad range of diabetes-related distresses, such as feeling over-whelmed with the diabetes regimen; being concerned about the future and the possibility of serious complications; and feeling guilty when management is going poorly. This disease burden and emotional distress in individuals with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, even at levels of severity below the threshold for a psychiatric diagnosis of depression or anxiety, are associated with poor adherence to treatment, poor glycemic control, higher rates of diabetes complications, and impaired quality of life. […] Depression in the context of diabetes is […] associated with poor self-care with respect to diabetes treatment […] Depression among individuals with diabetes is also associated with increased health care use and expenditures, irrespective of age, sex, race/ethnicity, and health insurance status.3

“Women with type 1 diabetes have a 2-fold increased risk for developing an eating disorder and a 1.9-fold increased risk for developing subthreshold eating disorders than women without diabetes.6 Less is known about eating disorders in boys and men with diabetes. Disturbed eating behaviors in women with type 1 diabetes include binge eating and caloric purging through insulin restriction, with rates of these disturbed eating behaviors reported to occur in 31% to 40% of women with type 1 diabetes aged between 15 and 30 years.6 […] disordered eating behaviors persist and worsen over time. Women with type 1 diabetes and eating disorders have poorer glycemic control, with higher rates of hospitalizations and retinopathy, neuropathy, and premature death compared with similarly aged women with type 1 diabetes without eating disorders.6 […] few diabetes clinics provide mental health screening or integrate mental/behavioral health services in diabetes clinical care.4 It is neither practical nor affordable to use standardized psychiatric diagnostic interviews to diagnose mental health comorbidities in individuals with diabetes. Brief paper-and-pencil self-report measures such as the Beck Depression Inventory […] that screen for depressive symptoms are practical in diabetes clinical settings, but their use remains rare.”

The paper does not mention this, but it is important to note that there are multiple plausible biological pathways which might help to explain bidirectional linkage between depression and type 2 diabetes. Physiological ‘stress’ (think: inflammation) is likely to be an important factor, and so are the typical physiological responses to some of the pharmacological treatments used to treat depression (…as well as other mental health conditions); multiple drugs used in psychiatry, including tricyclic antidepressants, cause weight gain and have proven diabetogenic effects – I’ve covered these topics before here on the blog. I’ve incidentally also covered other topics touched briefly upon in the paper – here’s for example a more comprehensive post about screening for depression in the diabetes context, and here’s a post with some information about how one might go about screening for eating disorders; skin signs are important. I was a bit annoyed that the author of the above paper did not mention this, as observing whether or not Russell’s sign – which is a very reliable indicator of eating disorder – is present or not is easier/cheaper/faster than performing any kind of even semi-valid depression screen.

v. Diabetes, Depression, and Quality of Life. This last one covers topics related to the topics covered in the paper above.

“The study consisted of a representative population sample of individuals aged ≥15 years living in South Australia comprising 3,010 personal interviews conducted by trained health interviewers. The prevalence of depression in those suffering doctor-diagnosed diabetes and comparative effects of diabetic status and depression on quality-of-life dimensions were measured.

RESULTS—The prevalence of depression in the diabetic population was 24% compared with 17% in the nondiabetic population. Those with diabetes and depression experienced an impact with a large effect size on every dimension of the Short Form Health-Related Quality-of-Life Questionnaire (SF-36) as compared with those who suffered diabetes and who were not depressed. A supplementary analysis comparing both depressed diabetic and depressed nondiabetic groups showed there were statistically significant differences in the quality-of-life effects between the two depressed populations in the physical and mental component summaries of the SF-36.

CONCLUSIONS—Depression for those with diabetes is an important comorbidity that requires careful management because of its severe impact on quality of life.”

I felt slightly curious about the setup after having read this, because representative population samples of individuals should not in my opinion yield depression rates of either 17% nor 24%. Rates that high suggest to me that the depression criteria used in the paper are a bit ‘laxer’/more inclusive than what you see in some other contexts when reading this sort of literature – to give an example of what I mean, the depression screening post I link to above noted that clinical or major depression occurred in 11.4% of people with diabetes, compared to a non-diabetic prevalence of 5%. There’s a long way from 11% to 24% and from 5% to 17%. Another potential explanation for such a high depression rate could of course also be some sort of selection bias at the data acquisition stage, but that’s obviously not the case here. However 3000 interviews is a lot of interviews, so let’s read on…

“Several studies have assessed the impact of depression in diabetes in terms of the individual’s functional ability or quality of life (3,4,13). Brown et al. (13) examined preference-based time tradeoff utility values associated with diabetes and showed that those with diabetes were willing to trade a significant proportion of their remaining life in return for a diabetes-free health state.”

“Depression was assessed using the mood module of the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders questionnaire. This has been validated to provide estimates of mental disorder comparable with those found using structured and longer diagnostic interview schedules (16). The mental disorders examined in the questionnaire included major depressive disorder, dysthymia, minor depressive disorder, and bipolar disorder. [So yes, the depression criteria used in this study are definitely more inclusive than depression criteria including only people with MDD] […] The Short Form Health-Related Quality-of-Life Questionnaire (SF-36) was also included to assess the quality of life of the different population groups with and without diabetes. […] Five groups were examined: the overall population without diabetes and without depression; the overall diabetic population; the depression-only population; the diabetic population without depression; and the diabetic population with depression.”

“Of the population sample, 205 (6.8%) were classified as having major depression, 130 (4.3%) had minor depression, 105 (3.5%) had partial remission of major depression, 79 (2.6%) had dysthymia, and 5 (0.2%) had bipolar disorder (depressed phase). No depressive syndrome was detected in 2,486 (82.6%) respondents. The population point prevalence of doctor-diagnosed diabetes in this survey was 5.2% (95% CI 4.6–6.0). The prevalence of depression in the diabetic population was 23.6% (22.1–25.1) compared with 17.1% (15.8–18.4) in the nondiabetic population. This difference approached statistical significance (P = 0.06). […] There [was] a clear difference in the quality-of-life scores for the diabetic and depression group when compared with the diabetic group without depression […] Overall, the highest quality-of-life scores are experienced by those without diabetes and depression and the lowest by those with diabetes and depression. […] the standard scores of those with no diabetes have quality-of-life status comparable with the population mean or slightly better. At the other extreme those with diabetes and depression experience the most severe comparative impact on quality-of-life for every dimension. Between these two extremes, diabetes overall and the diabetes without depression groups have a moderate-to-severe impact on the physical functioning, role limitations (physical), and general health scales […] The results of the two-factor ANOVA showed that the interaction term was significant only for the PCS [Physical Component Score – US] scale, indicating a greater than additive effect of diabetes and depression on the physical health dimension.”

“[T]here was a significant interaction between diabetes and depression on the PCS but not on the MCS [Mental Component Score. Do note in this context that the no-interaction result is far from certain, because as they observe: “it may simply be sample size that has not allowed us to observe a greater than additive effect in the MCS scale. Although there was no significant interaction between diabetes and depression and the MCS scale, we did observe increases on the effect size for the mental health dimensions”]. One explanation for this finding might be that depression can influence physical outcomes, such as recovery from myocardial infarction, survival with malignancy, and propensity to infection. Various mechanisms have been proposed for this, including changes to the immune system (24). Other possibilities are that depression in diabetes may affect the capacity to maintain medication vigilance, maintain a good diet, and maintain other lifestyle factors, such as smoking and exercise, all of which are likely possible pathways for a greater than additive effect. Whatever the mechanism involved, these data indicate that the addition of depression to diabetes has a severe impact on quality of life, and this needs to be managed in clinical practice.”

May 25, 2017 Posted by | Cardiology, Diabetes, Health Economics, Medicine, Nephrology, Neurology, Ophthalmology, Papers, Personal, Pharmacology, Psychiatry, Psychology | Leave a comment

Today’s Landscape of Pharmaceutical Research in Cancer

It’s been a while since I watched this lecture so I don’t remember the details very well, but I usually add notes in my bookmarks when I watch lectures so that I know what details to include in my comments here on the blog, and I have added the details from the bookmark notes below.

It is a short lecture, the lecture itself lasts only roughly 30 minutes; it doesn’t really start until roughly the 9 minutes and 30 seconds mark, and it finishes around the 44 min mark (the rest is Q&A – I skipped some of the introduction, but watched the Q&A). The lecture is not very technical, I think the content is perfectly understandable also to people without a medical background. One data point from the lecture which I thought worth including in these comments is this: According to Sigal, “roughly 30 per cent of the biopharmaceutical industry’s portfolio … is focused on research in oncology.”

May 17, 2017 Posted by | Cancer/oncology, Health Economics, Immunology, Lectures, Medicine, Pharmacology | Leave a comment

A few diabetes papers of interest

1. Cognitive Dysfunction in Older Adults With Diabetes: What a Clinician Needs to Know. I’ve talked about these topics before here on the blog (see e.g. these posts on related topics), but this is a good summary article. I have added some observations from the paper below:

“Although cognitive dysfunction is associated with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, there are several distinct differences observed in the domains of cognition affected in patients with these two types. Patients with type 1 diabetes are more likely to have diminished mental flexibility and slowing of mental speed, whereas learning and memory are largely not affected (8). Patients with type 2 diabetes show decline in executive function, memory, learning, attention, and psychomotor efficiency (9,10).”

“So far, it seems that the risk of cognitive dysfunction in type 2 diabetes may be influenced by glycemic control, hypoglycemia, inflammation, depression, and macro- and microvascular pathology (14). The cumulative impact of these conditions on the vascular etiology may further decrease the threshold at which cognition is affected by other neurological conditions in the aging brain. In patients with type 1 diabetes, it seems as though diabetes has a lesser impact on cognitive dysfunction than those patients with type 2 diabetes. […] Thus, the cognitive decline in patients with type 1 diabetes may be mild and may not interfere with their functionality until later years, when other aging-related factors become important. […] However, recent studies have shown a higher prevalence of cognitive dysfunction in older patients (>60 years of age) with type 1 diabetes (5).”

“Unlike other chronic diseases, diabetes self-care involves many behaviors that require various degrees of cognitive pliability and insight to perform proper self-care coordination and planning. Glucose monitoring, medications and/or insulin injections, pattern management, and diet and exercise timing require participation from different domains of cognitive function. In addition, the recognition, treatment, and prevention of hypoglycemia, which are critical for the older population, also depend in large part on having intact cognition.

The reason a clinician needs to recognize different domains of cognition affected in patients with diabetes is to understand which self-care behavior will be affected in that individual. […] For example, a patient with memory problems may forget to take insulin doses, forget to take medications/insulin on time, or forget to eat on time. […] Cognitively impaired patients using insulin are more likely to not know what to do in the event of low blood glucose or how to manage medication on sick days (34). Patients with diminished mental flexibility and processing speed may do well with a simple regimen but may fail if the regimen is too complex. In general, older patients with diabetes with cognitive dysfunction are less likely to be involved in diabetes self-care and glucose monitoring compared with age-matched control subjects (35). […] Other comorbidities associated with aging and diabetes also add to the burden of cognitive impairment and its impact on self-care abilities. For example, depression is associated with a greater decline in cognitive function in patients with type 2 diabetes (36). Depression also can independently negatively impact the motivation to practice self-care.”

“Recently, there is an increasing discomfort with the use of A1C as a sole parameter to define glycemic goals in the older population. Studies have shown that A1C values in the older population may not reflect the same estimated mean glucose as in the younger population. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are the commonly present comorbidities that impact red cell life span (e.g., anemia, uremia, renal dysfunction, blood transfusion, erythropoietin therapy) (45,46). In addition, A1C level does not reflect glucose excursions and variability. […] Thus, it is prudent to avoid A1C as the sole measure of glycemic goal in this population. […] In patients who need insulin therapy, simplification, also known as de-intensification of the regimen, is generally recommended in all frail patients, especially if they have cognitive dysfunction (37,49). However, the practice has not caught up with the recommendations as shown by large observational studies showing unnecessary intensive control in patients with diabetes and dementia (50–52).”

“With advances in the past few decades, we now see a larger number of patients with type 1 diabetes who are aging successfully and facing the new challenges that aging brings. […] Patients with type 1 diabetes are typically proactive in their disease management and highly disciplined. Cognitive dysfunction in these patients creates significant distress for the first time in their lives; they suddenly feel a “lack of control” over the disease they have managed for many decades. The addition of autonomic dysfunction, gastropathy, or neuropathy may result in wider glucose excursions. These patients are usually more afraid of hyperglycemia than hypoglycemia — both of which they have managed for many years. However, cognitive dysfunction in older adults with type 1 diabetes has been found to be associated with hypoglycemic unawareness and glucose variability (5), which in turn increases the risk of severe hypoglycemia (54). The need for goal changes to avoid hypoglycemia and accept some hyperglycemia can be very difficult for many of these patients.”

2. Trends in Drug Utilization, Glycemic Control, and Rates of Severe Hypoglycemia, 2006–2013.

“From 2006 to 2013, use increased for metformin (from 47.6 to 53.5%), dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors (0.5 to 14.9%), and insulin (17.1 to 23.0%) but declined for sulfonylureas (38.8 to 30.8%) and thiazolidinediones (28.5 to 5.6%; all P < 0.001). […] The overall rate of severe hypoglycemia remained the same (1.3 per 100 person-years; P = 0.72), declined modestly among the oldest patients (from 2.9 to 2.3; P < 0.001), and remained high among those with two or more comorbidities (3.2 to 3.5; P = 0.36). […] During the recent 8-year period, the use of glucose-lowering drugs has changed dramatically among patients with T2DM. […] The use of older classes of medications, such as sulfonylureas and thiazolidinediones, declined. During this time, glycemic control of T2DM did not improve in the overall population and remained poor among nearly a quarter of the youngest patients. Rates of severe hypoglycemia remained largely unchanged, with the oldest patients and those with multiple comorbidities at highest risk. These findings raise questions about the value of the observed shifts in drug utilization toward newer and costlier medications.”

“Our findings are consistent with a prior study of drug prescribing in U.S. ambulatory practice conducted from 1997 to 2012 (2). In that study, similar increases in DPP-4 inhibitor and insulin analog prescribing were observed; these changes were accompanied by a 61% increase in drug expenditures (2). Our study extends these findings to drug utilization and demonstrates that these increases occurred in all age and comorbidity subgroups. […] In contrast, metformin use increased only modestly between 2006 and 2013 and remained relatively low among older patients and those with two or more comorbidities. Although metformin is recommended as first-line therapy (26), it may be underutilized as the initial agent for the treatment of T2DM (27). Its use may be additionally limited by coexisting contraindications, such as chronic kidney disease (28).”

“The proportion of patients with a diagnosis of diabetes who did not fill any glucose-lowering medications declined slightly (25.7 to 24.1%; P < 0.001).”

That is, one in four people who had a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes were not taking any prescription drugs for their health condition. I wonder how many of those people have read wikipedia articles like this one

“When considering treatment complexity, the use of oral monotherapy increased slightly (from 24.3 to 26.4%) and the use of multiple (two or more) oral agents declined (from 33.0 to 26.5%), whereas the use of insulin alone and in combination with oral agents increased (from 6.0 to 8.5% and from 11.1 to 14.6%, respectively; all P values <0.001).”

“Between 1987 and 2011, per person medical spending attributable to diabetes doubled (4). More than half of the increase was due to prescription drug spending (4). Despite these spending increases and greater utilization of newly developed medications, we showed no concurrent improvements in overall glycemic control or the rates of severe hypoglycemia in our study. Although the use of newer and more expensive agents may have other important benefits (44), further studies are needed to define the value and cost-effectiveness of current treatment options.”

iii. Among Low-Income Respondents With Diabetes, High-Deductible Versus No-Deductible Insurance Sharply Reduces Medical Service Use.

“Using the 2011–2013 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, bivariate and regression analyses were conducted to compare demographic characteristics, medical service use, diabetes care, and health status among privately insured adult respondents with diabetes, aged 18–64 years (N = 1,461) by lower (<200% of the federal poverty level) and higher (≥200% of the federal poverty level) income and deductible vs. no deductible (ND), low deductible ($1,000/$2,400) (LD), and high deductible (>$1,000/$2,400) (HD). The National Health Interview Survey 2012–2014 was used to analyze differences in medical debt and delayed/avoided needed care among adult respondents with diabetes (n = 4,058) by income. […] Compared with privately insured respondents with diabetes with ND, privately insured lower-income respondents with diabetes with an LD report significant decreases in service use for primary care, checkups, and specialty visits (27%, 39%, and 77% lower, respectively), and respondents with an HD decrease use by 42%, 65%, and 86%, respectively. Higher-income respondents with an LD report significant decreases in specialty (28%) and emergency department (37%) visits.”

“The reduction in ambulatory visits made by lower-income respondents with ND compared with lower-income respondents with an LD or HD is far greater than for higher-income patients. […] The substantial reduction in checkup (preventive) and specialty visits by those with a lower income who have an HDHP [high-deductible health plan, US] implies a very different pattern of service use compared with lower-income respondents who have ND and with higher-income respondents. Though preventive visits require no out-of-pocket costs, reduced preventive service use with HDHPs is well established and might be the result of patients being unaware of this benefit or their concern about findings that could lead to additional expenses (31). Such sharply reduced service use by low-income respondents with diabetes may not be desirable. Patients with diabetes benefit from assessment of diabetes control, encouragement and reinforcement of behavior change and medication use, and early detection and treatment of diabetes complications or concomitant disease.”

iv. Long-term Mortality and End-Stage Renal Disease in a Type 1 Diabetes Population Diagnosed at Age 15–29 Years in Norway.

OBJECTIVE To study long-term mortality, causes of death, and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in people diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 15–29 years.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This nationwide, population-based cohort with type 1 diabetes diagnosed during 1978–1982 (n = 719) was followed from diagnosis until death, emigration, or September 2013. Linkages to the Norwegian Cause of Death Registry and the Norwegian Renal Registry provided information on causes of death and whether ESRD was present.

RESULTS During 30 years’ follow-up, 4.6% of participants developed ESRD and 20.6% (n = 148; 106 men and 42 women) died. Cumulative mortality by years since diagnosis was 6.0% (95% CI 4.5–8.0) at 10 years, 12.2% (10.0–14.8) at 20 years, and 18.4% (15.8–21.5) at 30 years. The SMR [standardized mortality ratio] was 4.4 (95% CI 3.7–5.1). Mean time from diagnosis of diabetes to ESRD was 23.6 years (range 14.2–33.5). Death was caused by chronic complications (32.2%), acute complications (20.5%), violent death (19.9%), or any other cause (27.4%). Death was related to alcohol in 15% of cases. SMR for alcohol-related death was 6.8 (95% CI 4.5–10.3), for cardiovascular death was 7.3 (5.4–10.0), and for violent death was 3.6 (2.3–5.3).

CONCLUSIONS The cumulative incidence of ESRD was low in this cohort with type 1 diabetes followed for 30 years. Mortality was 4.4 times that of the general population, and more than 50% of all deaths were caused by acute or chronic complications. A relatively high proportion of deaths were related to alcohol.”

Some additional observations from the paper:

“Studies assessing causes of death in type 1 diabetes are most frequently conducted in individuals diagnosed during childhood (17) or without evaluating the effect of age at diagnosis (8,9). Reports on causes of death in cohorts of patients diagnosed during late adolescence or young adulthood, with long-term follow-up, are less frequent (10). […] Adherence to treatment during this age is poor and the risk of acute diabetic complications is high (1316). Mortality may differ between those with diabetes diagnosed during this period of life and those diagnosed during childhood.”

“Mortality was between four and five times higher than in the general population […]. The excess mortality was similar for men […] and women […]. SMR was higher in the lower age bands — 6.7 (95% CI 3.9–11.5) at 15–24 years and 7.3 (95% CI 5.2–10.1) at 25–34 years — compared with the higher age bands: 3.7 (95% CI 2.7–4.9) at 45–54 years and 3.9 (95% CI 2.6–5.8) at 55–65 years […]. The Cox regression model showed that the risk of death increased significantly by age at diagnosis (HR 1.1; 95% CI 1.1–1.2; P < 0.001) and was eight to nine times higher if ESRD was present (HR 8.7; 95% CI 4.8–15.5; P < 0.0001). […] the underlying cause of death was diabetes in 57 individuals (39.0%), circulatory in 22 (15.1%), cancer in 18 (12.3%), accidents or intoxications in 20 (13.7%), suicide in 8 (5.5%), and any other cause in 21 (14.4%) […] In addition, diabetes contributed to death in 29.5% (n = 43) and CVD contributed to death in 10.9% (n = 29) of the 146 cases. Diabetes was mentioned on the death certificate for 68.2% of the cohort but for only 30.0% of the violent deaths. […] In 60% (88/146) of the cases the review committee considered death to be related to diabetes, whereas in 40% (58/146) the cause was unrelated to diabetes or had an unknown relation to diabetes. According to the clinical committee, acute complications caused death in 20.5% (30/146) of the cases; 20 individuals died as a result of DKA and 10 from hypoglycemia. […] Chronic complications caused the largest proportion of deaths (47/146; 32.2%) and increased with increasing duration of diabetes […]. Among individuals dying as a result of chronic complications (n = 47), CVD caused death in 94% (n = 44) and renal failure in 6% (n = 3). ESRD contributed to death in 22.7% (10/44) of those dying from CVD. Cardiovascular death occurred at mortality rates seven times higher than those in the general population […]. ESRD caused or contributed to death in 13 of 14 cases, when present.”

“Violence (intoxications, accidents, and suicides) was the leading cause of death before 10 years’ duration of diabetes; thereafter it was only a minor cause […] Insulin was used in two of seven suicides. […] According to the available medical records and autopsy reports, about 20% (29/146) of the deceased misused alcohol. In 15% (22/146) alcohol-related ICD-10 codes were listed on the death certificate (18% [19/106] of men and 8% [3/40] of women). In 10 cases the cause of death was uncertain but considered to be related to alcohol or diabetes […] The SMR for alcohol-related death was high when considering the underlying cause of death (5.0; 95% CI 2.5–10.0), and even higher when considering all alcohol-related ICD-10 codes listed on the death certificate (6.8; 95% CI 4.5–10.3). The cause of death was associated with alcohol in 21.8% (19/87) of those who died with less than 20 years’ diabetes duration. Drug abuse was noted on the death certificate in only two cases.”

“During follow-up, 33 individuals (4.6%; 22 men and 11 women) developed ESRD as a result of diabetic nephropathy. Mean time from diagnosis of diabetes to ESRD was 23.6 years (range 14.2–33.5 years). Cumulative incidence of ESRD by years since diagnosis of diabetes was 1.4% (95% CI 0.7–2.7) at 20 years and 4.8% (95% CI 3.4–6.9) at 30 years.”

“This study highlights three important findings. First, among individuals who were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in late adolescence and early adulthood and had good access to health care, and who were followed for 30 years, mortality was four to five times that of the general population. Second, 15% of all deaths were associated with alcohol, and the SMR for alcohol-related deaths was 6.8. Third, there was a relatively low cumulative incidence of ESRD (4.8%) 30 years after the diagnosis of diabetes.

We report mortality higher than those from a large, population-based study from Finland that found cumulative mortality around 6% at 20 years’ and 15% at 30 years’ duration of diabetes among a population with age at onset and year of diagnosis similar to those in our cohort (10). The corresponding numbers in our cohort were 12% and 18%, respectively; the discrepancy was particularly high at 20 years. The SMR in the Finnish cohort was lower than that in our cohort (2.6–3.0 vs. 3.7–5.1), and those authors reported the SMR to be lower in late-onset diabetes (at age 15–29 years) compared with early-onset diabetes (at age 23). The differences between the Norwegian and Finnish data are difficult to explain since both reports are from countries with good access to health care and a high incidence of type 1 diabetes.”

However the reason for the somewhat different SMRs in these two reasonably similar countries may actually be quite simple – the important variable may be alcohol:

“Finland and Norway are appropriate to compare because they share important population and welfare characteristics. There are, however, significant differences in drinking levels and alcohol-related mortality: the Finnish population consumes more alcohol and the Norwegian population consumes less. The mortality rates for deaths related to alcohol are about three to four times higher in Finland than in Norway (30). […] The markedly higher SMR in our cohort can probably be explained by the lower mortality rates for alcohol-related mortality in the general population. […] In conclusion, the high mortality reported in this cohort with an onset of diabetes in late adolescence and young adulthood draws attention to people diagnosed during a vulnerable period of life. Both acute and chronic complications cause substantial premature mortality […] Our study suggests that increased awareness of alcohol-related death should be encouraged in clinics providing health care to this group of patients.”

April 23, 2017 Posted by | Diabetes, Economics, Epidemiology, Health Economics, Medicine, Nephrology, Neurology, Papers, Pharmacology, Psychology | Leave a comment