Econstudentlog

A few (more) diabetes papers of interest

Earlier this week I covered a couple of papers, but the second paper turned out to include a lot of interesting stuff so I decided to cut the post short and postpone my coverage of the other papers I’d intended to cover in that post until a later point in time; this post includes some of those other papers I’d intended to cover in that post.

i. TCF7L2 Genetic Variants Contribute to Phenotypic Heterogeneity of Type 1 Diabetes.

“Although the autoimmune destruction of β-cells has a major role in the development of type 1 diabetes, there is growing evidence that the differences in clinical, metabolic, immunologic, and genetic characteristics among patients (1) likely reflect diverse etiology and pathogenesis (2). Factors that govern this heterogeneity are poorly understood, yet these may have important implications for prognosis, therapy, and prevention.

The transcription factor 7 like 2 (TCF7L2) locus contains the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) most strongly associated with type 2 diabetes risk, with an ∼30% increase per risk allele (3). In a U.S. cohort, heterozygous and homozygous carriers of the at-risk alleles comprised 40.6% and 7.9%, respectively, of the control subjects and 44.3% and 18.3%, respectively, of the individuals with type 2 diabetes (3). The locus has no known association with type 1 diabetes overall (48), with conflicting reports in latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (816). […] Our studies in two separate cohorts have shown that the type 2 diabetes–associated TCF7L2 genetic variant is more frequent among specific subsets of individuals with autoimmune type 1 diabetes, specifically those with fewer markers of islet autoimmunity (22,23). These observations support a role of this genetic variant in the pathogenesis of diabetes at least in a subset of individuals with autoimmune diabetes. However, whether individuals with type 1 diabetes and this genetic variant have distinct metabolic abnormalities has not been investigated. We aimed to study the immunologic and metabolic characteristics of individuals with type 1 diabetes who carry a type 2 diabetes–associated allele of the TCF7L2 locus.”

“We studied 810 TrialNet participants with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes and found that among individuals 12 years and older, the type 2 diabetes–associated TCF7L2 genetic variant is more frequent in those presenting with a single autoantibody than in participants who had multiple autoantibodies. These TCF7L2 variants were also associated with higher mean C-peptide AUC and lower mean glucose AUC levels at the onset of type 1 diabetes. […] These findings suggest that, besides the well-known link with type 2 diabetes, the TCF7L2 locus may play a role in the development of type 1 diabetes. The type 2 diabetes–associated TCF7L2 genetic variant identifies a subset of individuals with autoimmune type 1 diabetes and fewer markers of islet autoimmunity, lower glucose, and higher C-peptide at diagnosis. […] A possible interpretation of these data is that TCF7L2-encoded diabetogenic mechanisms may contribute to diabetes development in individuals with limited autoimmunity […]. Because the risk of progression to type 1 diabetes is lower in individuals with single compared with multiple autoantibodies, it is possible that in the absence of this type 2 diabetes–associated TCF7L2 variant, these individuals may have not manifested diabetes. If that is the case, we would postulate that disease development in these patients may have a type 2 diabetes–like pathogenesis in which islet autoimmunity is a significant component but not necessarily the primary driver.”

“The association between this genetic variant and single autoantibody positivity was present in individuals 12 years or older but not in children younger than 12 years. […] The results in the current study suggest that the type 2 diabetes–associated TCF7L2 genetic variant plays a larger role in older individuals. There is mounting evidence that the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes varies by age (31). Younger individuals appear to have a more aggressive form of disease, with faster decline of β-cell function before and after onset of disease, higher frequency and severity of diabetic ketoacidosis, which is a clinical correlate of severe insulin deficiency, and lower C-peptide at presentation (3135). Furthermore, older patients are less likely to have type 1 diabetes–associated HLA alleles and islet autoantibodies (28). […] Taken together, we have demonstrated that individuals with autoimmune type 1 diabetes who carry the type 2 diabetes–associated TCF7L2 genetic variant have a distinct phenotype characterized by milder immunologic and metabolic characteristics than noncarriers, closer to those of type 2 diabetes, with an important effect of age.”

ii. Heart Failure: The Most Important, Preventable, and Treatable Cardiovascular Complication of Type 2 Diabetes.

“Concerns about cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes have traditionally focused on atherosclerotic vasculo-occlusive events, such as myocardial infarction, stroke, and limb ischemia. However, one of the earliest, most common, and most serious cardiovascular disorders in patients with diabetes is heart failure (1). Following its onset, patients experience a striking deterioration in their clinical course, which is marked by frequent hospitalizations and eventually death. Many sudden deaths in diabetes are related to underlying ventricular dysfunction rather than a new ischemic event. […] Heart failure and diabetes are linked pathophysiologically. Type 2 diabetes and heart failure are each characterized by insulin resistance and are accompanied by the activation of neurohormonal systems (norepinephrine, angiotensin II, aldosterone, and neprilysin) (3). The two disorders overlap; diabetes is present in 35–45% of patients with chronic heart failure, whether they have a reduced or preserved ejection fraction.”

“Treatments that lower blood glucose do not exert any consistently favorable effect on the risk of heart failure in patients with diabetes (6). In contrast, treatments that increase insulin signaling are accompanied by an increased risk of heart failure. Insulin use is independently associated with an enhanced likelihood of heart failure (7). Thiazolidinediones promote insulin signaling and have increased the risk of heart failure in controlled clinical trials (6). With respect to incretin-based secretagogues, liraglutide increases the clinical instability of patients with existing heart failure (8,9), and the dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors saxagliptin and alogliptin are associated with an increased risk of heart failure in diabetes (10). The likelihood of heart failure with the use of sulfonylureas may be comparable to that with thiazolidinediones (11). Interestingly, the only two classes of drugs that ameliorate hyperinsulinemia (metformin and sodium–glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors) are also the only two classes of antidiabetes drugs that appear to reduce the risk of heart failure and its adverse consequences (12,13). These findings are consistent with experimental evidence that insulin exerts adverse effects on the heart and kidneys that can contribute to heart failure (14). Therefore, physicians can prevent many cases of heart failure in type 2 diabetes by careful consideration of the choice of agents used to achieve glycemic control. Importantly, these decisions have an immediate effect; changes in risk are seen within the first few months of changes in treatment. This immediacy stands in contrast to the years of therapy required to see a benefit of antidiabetes drugs on microvascular risk.”

“As reported by van den Berge et al. (4), the prognosis of patients with heart failure has improved over the past two decades; heart failure with a reduced ejection fraction is a treatable disease. Inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system are a cornerstone of the management of both disorders; they prevent the onset of heart failure and the progression of nephropathy in patients with diabetes, and they reduce the risk of cardiovascular death and hospitalization in those with established heart failure (3,15). Diabetes does not influence the magnitude of the relative benefit of ACE inhibitors in patients with heart failure, but patients with diabetes experience a greater absolute benefit from treatment (16).”

“The totality of evidence from randomized trials […] demonstrates that in patients with diabetes, heart failure is not only common and clinically important, but it can also be prevented and treated. This conclusion is particularly significant because physicians have long ignored heart failure in their focus on glycemic control and their concerns about the ischemic macrovascular complications of diabetes (1).”

iii. Closely related to the above study: Mortality Reduction Associated With β-Adrenoceptor Inhibition in Chronic Heart Failure Is Greater in Patients With Diabetes.

“Diabetes increases mortality in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction. Studies have questioned the safety of β-adrenoceptor blockers (β-blockers) in some patients with diabetes and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction. We examined whether β-blockers and ACE inhibitors (ACEIs) are associated with differential effects on mortality in CHF patients with and without diabetes. […] We conducted a prospective cohort study of 1,797 patients with CHF recruited between 2006 and 2014, with mean follow-up of 4 years.”

RESULTS Patients with diabetes were prescribed larger doses of β-blockers and ACEIs than were patients without diabetes. Increasing β-blocker dose was associated with lower mortality in patients with diabetes (8.9% per mg/day; 95% CI 5–12.6) and without diabetes (3.5% per mg/day; 95% CI 0.7–6.3), although the effect was larger in people with diabetes (interaction P = 0.027). Increasing ACEI dose was associated with lower mortality in patients with diabetes (5.9% per mg/day; 95% CI 2.5–9.2) and without diabetes (5.1% per mg/day; 95% CI 2.6–7.6), with similar effect size in these groups (interaction P = 0.76).”

“Our most important findings are:

  • Higher-dose β-blockers are associated with lower mortality in patients with CHF and LVSD, but patients with diabetes may derive more benefit from higher-dose β-blockers.

  • Higher-dose ACEIs were associated with comparable mortality reduction in people with and without diabetes.

  • The association between higher β-blocker dose and reduced mortality is most pronounced in patients with diabetes who have more severely impaired left ventricular function.

  • Among patients with diabetes, the relationship between β-blocker dose and mortality was not associated with glycemic control or insulin therapy.”

“We make the important observation that patients with diabetes may derive more prognostic benefit from higher β-blocker doses than patients without diabetes. These data should provide reassurance to patients and health care providers and encourage careful but determined uptitration of β-blockers in this high-risk group of patients.”

iv. Diabetes, Prediabetes, and Brain Volumes and Subclinical Cerebrovascular Disease on MRI: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Neurocognitive Study (ARIC-NCS).

“Diabetes and prediabetes are associated with accelerated cognitive decline (1), and diabetes is associated with an approximately twofold increased risk of dementia (2). Subclinical brain pathology, as defined by small vessel disease (lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities [WMH], and microhemorrhages), large vessel disease (cortical infarcts), and smaller brain volumes also are associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia (37). The mechanisms by which diabetes contributes to accelerated cognitive decline and dementia are not fully understood, but contributions of hyperglycemia to both cerebrovascular disease and primary neurodegenerative disease have been suggested in the literature, although results are inconsistent (2,8). Given that diabetes is a vascular risk factor, brain atrophy among individuals with diabetes may be driven by increased cerebrovascular disease. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a noninvasive opportunity to study associations of hyperglycemia with small vessel disease (lacunar infarcts, WMH, microhemorrhages), large vessel disease (cortical infarcts), and brain volumes (9).”

“Overall, the mean age of participants [(n = 1,713)] was 75 years, 60% were women, 27% were black, 30% had prediabetes (HbA1c 5.7 to <6.5%), and 35% had diabetes. Compared with participants without diabetes and HbA1c <5.7%, those with prediabetes (HbA1c 5.7 to <6.5%) were of similar age (75.2 vs. 75.0 years; P = 0.551), were more likely to be black (24% vs. 11%; P < 0.001), have less than a high school education (11% vs. 7%; P = 0.017), and have hypertension (71% vs. 63%; P = 0.012) (Table 1). Among participants with diabetes, those with HbA1c <7.0% versus ≥7.0% were of similar age (75.4 vs. 75.1 years; P = 0.481), but those with diabetes and HbA1c ≥7.0% were more likely to be black (39% vs. 28%; P = 0.020) and to have less than a high school education (23% vs. 16%; P = 0.031) and were more likely to have a longer duration of diabetes (12 vs. 8 years; P < 0.001).”

“Compared with participants without diabetes and HbA1c <5.7%, those with diabetes and HbA1c ≥7.0% had smaller total brain volume (β −0.20 SDs; 95% CI −0.31, −0.09) and smaller regional brain volumes, including frontal, temporal, occipital, and parietal lobes; deep gray matter; Alzheimer disease signature region; and hippocampus (all P < 0.05) […]. Compared with participants with diabetes and HbA1c <7.0%, those with diabetes and HbA1c ≥7.0% had smaller total brain volume (P < 0.001), frontal lobe volume (P = 0.012), temporal lobe volume (P = 0.012), occipital lobe volume (P = 0.008), parietal lobe volume (P = 0.015), deep gray matter volume (P < 0.001), Alzheimer disease signature region volume (0.031), and hippocampal volume (P = 0.016). Both participants with diabetes and HbA1c <7.0% and those with prediabetes (HbA1c 5.7 to <6.5%) had similar total and regional brain volumes compared with participants without diabetes and HbA1c <5.7% (all P > 0.05). […] No differences in the presence of lobar microhemorrhages, subcortical microhemorrhages, cortical infarcts, and lacunar infarcts were observed among the diabetes-HbA1c categories (all P > 0.05) […]. Compared with participants without diabetes and HbA1c <5.7%, those with diabetes and HbA1c ≥7.0% had increased WMH volume (P = 0.016). The WMH volume among participants with diabetes and HbA1c ≥7.0% was also significantly greater than among those with diabetes and HbA1c <7.0% (P = 0.017).”

“Those with diabetes duration ≥10 years were older than those with diabetes duration <10 years (75.9 vs. 75.0 years; P = 0.041) but were similar in terms of race and sex […]. Compared with participants with diabetes duration <10 years, those with diabetes duration ≥10 years has smaller adjusted total brain volume (β −0.13 SDs; 95% CI −0.20, −0.05) and smaller temporal lobe (β −0.14 SDs; 95% CI −0.24, −0.03), parietal lobe (β − 0.11 SDs; 95% CI −0.21, −0.01), and hippocampal (β −0.16 SDs; 95% CI −0.30, −0.02) volumes […]. Participants with diabetes duration ≥10 years also had a 2.44 times increased odds (95% CI 1.46, 4.05) of lacunar infarcts compared with those with diabetes duration <10 years”.

Conclusions
In this community-based population, we found that ARIC-NCS participants with diabetes with HbA1c ≥7.0% have smaller total and regional brain volumes and an increased burden of WMH, but those with prediabetes (HbA1c 5.7 to <6.5%) and diabetes with HbA1c <7.0% have brain volumes and markers of subclinical cerebrovascular disease similar to those without diabetes. Furthermore, among participants with diabetes, those with more-severe disease (as measured by higher HbA1c and longer disease duration) had smaller total and regional brain volumes and an increased burden of cerebrovascular disease compared with those with lower HbA1c and shorter disease duration. However, we found no evidence that associations of diabetes with smaller brain volumes are mediated by cerebrovascular disease.

The findings of this study extend the current literature that suggests that diabetes is strongly associated with brain volume loss (11,2527). Global brain volume loss (11,2527) has been consistently reported, but associations of diabetes with smaller specific brain regions have been less robust (27,28). Similar to prior studies, the current results show that compared with individuals without diabetes, those with diabetes have smaller total brain volume (11,2527) and regional brain volumes, including frontal and occipital lobes, deep gray matter, and the hippocampus (25,27). Furthermore, the current study suggests that greater severity of disease (as measured by HbA1c and diabetes duration) is associated with smaller total and regional brain volumes. […] Mechanisms whereby diabetes may contribute to brain volume loss include accelerated amyloid-β and hyperphosphorylated tau deposition as a result of hyperglycemia (29). Another possible mechanism involves pancreatic amyloid (amylin) infiltration of the brain, which then promotes amyloid-β deposition (29). […] Taken together, […] the current results suggest that diabetes is associated with both lower brain volumes and increased cerebrovascular pathology (WMH and lacunes).”

v. Interventions to increase attendance for diabetic retinopathy screening (Cochrane review).

“The primary objective of the review was to assess the effectiveness of quality improvement (QI) interventions that seek to increase attendance for DRS in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

Secondary objectives were:
To use validated taxonomies of QI intervention strategies and behaviour change techniques (BCTs) to code the description of interventions in the included studies and determine whether interventions that include particular QI strategies or component BCTs are more effective in increasing screening attendance;
To explore heterogeneity in effect size within and between studies to identify potential explanatory factors for variability in effect size;
To explore differential effects in subgroups to provide information on how equity of screening attendance could be improved;
To critically appraise and summarise current evidence on the resource use, costs and cost effectiveness.”

“We included 66 RCTs conducted predominantly (62%) in the USA. Overall we judged the trials to be at low or unclear risk of bias. QI strategies were multifaceted and targeted patients, healthcare professionals or healthcare systems. Fifty-six studies (329,164 participants) compared intervention versus usual care (median duration of follow-up 12 months). Overall, DRS [diabetic retinopathy screening] attendance increased by 12% (risk difference (RD) 0.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.10 to 0.14; low-certainty evidence) compared with usual care, with substantial heterogeneity in effect size. Both DRS-targeted (RD 0.17, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.22) and general QI interventions (RD 0.12, 95% CI 0.09 to 0.15) were effective, particularly where baseline DRS attendance was low. All BCT combinations were associated with significant improvements, particularly in those with poor attendance. We found higher effect estimates in subgroup analyses for the BCTs ‘goal setting (outcome)’ (RD 0.26, 95% CI 0.16 to 0.36) and ‘feedback on outcomes of behaviour’ (RD 0.22, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.29) in interventions targeting patients, and ‘restructuring the social environment’ (RD 0.19, 95% CI 0.12 to 0.26) and ‘credible source’ (RD 0.16, 95% CI 0.08 to 0.24) in interventions targeting healthcare professionals.”

“Ten studies (23,715 participants) compared a more intensive (stepped) intervention versus a less intensive intervention. In these studies DRS attendance increased by 5% (RD 0.05, 95% CI 0.02 to 0.09; moderate-certainty evidence).”

“Overall, we found that there is insufficient evidence to draw robust conclusions about the relative cost effectiveness of the interventions compared to each other or against usual care.”

“The results of this review provide evidence that QI interventions targeting patients, healthcare professionals or the healthcare system are associated with meaningful improvements in DRS attendance compared to usual care. There was no statistically significant difference between interventions specifically aimed at DRS and those which were part of a general QI strategy for improving diabetes care.”

vi. Diabetes in China: Epidemiology and Genetic Risk Factors and Their Clinical Utility in Personalized Medication.

“The incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) has rapidly increased over recent decades, and T2D has become a leading public health challenge in China. Compared with European descents, Chinese patients with T2D are diagnosed at a relatively young age and low BMI. A better understanding of the factors contributing to the diabetes epidemic is crucial for determining future prevention and intervention programs. In addition to environmental factors, genetic factors contribute substantially to the development of T2D. To date, more than 100 susceptibility loci for T2D have been identified. Individually, most T2D genetic variants have a small effect size (10–20% increased risk for T2D per risk allele); however, a genetic risk score that combines multiple T2D loci could be used to predict the risk of T2D and to identify individuals who are at a high risk. […] In this article, we review the epidemiological trends and recent progress in the understanding of T2D genetic etiology and further discuss personalized medicine involved in the treatment of T2D.”

“Over the past three decades, the prevalence of diabetes in China has sharply increased. The prevalence of diabetes was reported to be less than 1% in 1980 (2), 5.5% in 2001 (3), 9.7% in 2008 (4), and 10.9% in 2013, according to the latest published nationwide survey (5) […]. The prevalence of diabetes was higher in the senior population, men, urban residents, individuals living in economically developed areas, and overweight and obese individuals. The estimated prevalence of prediabetes in 2013 was 35.7%, which was much higher than the estimate of 15.5% in the 2008 survey. Similarly, the prevalence of prediabetes was higher in the senior population, men, and overweight and obese individuals. However, prediabetes was more prevalent in rural residents than in urban residents. […] the 2013 survey also compared the prevalence of diabetes among different races. The crude prevalence of diabetes was 14.7% in the majority group, i.e., Chinese Han, which was higher than that in most minority ethnic groups, including Tibetan, Zhuang, Uyghur, and Muslim. The crude prevalence of prediabetes was also higher in the Chinese Han ethnic group. The Tibetan participants had the lowest prevalence of diabetes and prediabetes (4.3% and 31.3%).”

“[T]he prevalence of diabetes in young people is relatively high and increasing. The prevalence of diabetes in the 20- to 39-year age-group was 3.2%, according to the 2008 national survey (4), and was 5.9%, according to the 2013 national survey (5). The prevalence of prediabetes also increased from 9.0% in 2008 to 28.8% in 2013 […]. Young people suffering from diabetes have a higher risk of chronic complications, which are the major cause of mortality and morbidity in diabetes. According to a study conducted in Asia (6), patients with young-onset diabetes had higher mean concentrations of HbA1c and LDL cholesterol and a higher prevalence of retinopathy (20% vs. 18%, P = 0.011) than those with late-onset diabetes. In the Chinese, patients with early-onset diabetes had a higher risk of nonfatal cardiovascular disease (7) than did patients with late-onset diabetes (odds ratio [OR] 1.91, 95% CI 1.81–2.02).”

“As approximately 95% of patients with diabetes in China have T2D, the rapid increase in the prevalence of diabetes in China may be attributed to the increasing rates of overweight and obesity and the reduction in physical activity, which is driven by economic development, lifestyle changes, and diet (3,11). According to a series of nationwide surveys conducted by the China Physical Fitness Surveillance Center (12), the prevalence of overweight (BMI ≥23.0 to <27.5 kg/m2) in Chinese adults aged 20–59 years increased from 37.4% in 2000 to 39.2% in 2005, 40.7% in 2010, and 41.2% in 2014, with an estimated increase of 0.27% per year. The prevalence of obesity (BMI ≥27.5 kg/m2) increased from 8.6% in 2000 to 10.3% in 2005, 12.2% in 2010, and 12.9% in 2014, with an estimated increase of 0.32% per year […]. The prevalence of central obesity increased from 13.9% in 2000 to 18.3% in 2005, 22.1% in 2010, and 24.9% in 2014, with an estimated increase of 0.78% per year. Notably, T2D develops at a considerably lower BMI in the Chinese population than that in European populations. […] The relatively high risk of diabetes at a lower BMI could be partially attributed to the tendency toward visceral adiposity in East Asian populations, including the Chinese population (13). Moreover, East Asian populations have been found to have a higher insulin sensitivity with a much lower insulin response than European descent and African populations, implying a lower compensatory β-cell function, which increases the risk of progressing to overt diabetes (14).”

“Over the past two decades, linkage analyses, candidate gene approaches, and large-scale GWAS have successfully identified more than 100 genes that confer susceptibility to T2D among the world’s major ethnic populations […], most of which were discovered in European populations. However, less than 50% of these European-derived loci have been successfully confirmed in East Asian populations. […] there is a need to identify specific genes that are associated with T2D in other ethnic populations. […] Although many genetic loci have been shown to confer susceptibility to T2D, the mechanism by which these loci participate in the pathogenesis of T2D remains unknown. Most T2D loci are located near genes that are related to β-cell function […] most single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) contributing to the T2D risk are located in introns, but whether these SNPs directly modify gene expression or are involved in linkage disequilibrium with unknown causal variants remains to be investigated. Furthermore, the loci discovered thus far collectively account for less than 15% of the overall estimated genetic heritability.”

“The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) are usually used to assess the discriminative accuracy of an approach. The AUC values range from 0.5 to 1.0, where an AUC of 0.5 represents a lack of discrimination and an AUC of 1 represents perfect discrimination. An AUC ≥0.75 is considered clinically useful. The dominant conventional risk factors, including age, sex, BMI, waist circumference, blood pressure, family history of diabetes, physical activity level, smoking status, and alcohol consumption, can be combined to construct conventional risk factor–based models (CRM). Several studies have compared the predictive capacities of models with and without genetic information. The addition of genetic markers to a CRM could slightly improve the predictive performance. For example, one European study showed that the addition of an 11-SNP GRS to a CRM marginally improved the risk prediction (AUC was 0.74 without and 0.75 with the genetic markers, P < 0.001) in a prospective cohort of 16,000 individuals (37). A meta-analysis (38) consisting of 23 studies investigating the predictive performance of T2D risk models also reported that the AUCs only slightly increased with the addition of genetic information to the CRM (median AUC was increased from 0.78 to 0.79). […] Despite great advances in genetic studies, the clinical utility of genetic information in the prediction, early identification, and prevention of T2D remains in its preliminary stage.”

“An increasing number of studies have highlighted that early nutrition has a persistent effect on the risk of diabetes in later life (40,41). China’s Great Famine of 1959–1962 is considered to be the largest and most severe famine of the 20th century […] Li et al. (43) found that offspring of mothers exposed to the Chinese famine have a 3.9-fold increased risk of diabetes or hyperglycemia as adults. A more recent study (the Survey on Prevalence in East China for Metabolic Diseases and Risk Factors [SPECT-China]) conducted in 2014, among 6,897 adults from Shanghai, Jiangxi, and Zhejiang provinces, had the same conclusion that famine exposure during the fetal period (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.09–2.14) and childhood (OR 1.82, 95% CI 1.21–2.73) was associated with diabetes (44). These findings indicate that undernutrition during early life increases the risk of hyperglycemia in adulthood and this association is markedly exaggerated when facing overnutrition in later life.”

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February 23, 2018 Posted by | Cardiology, Diabetes, Epidemiology, Genetics, Health Economics, Immunology, Medicine, Neurology, Ophthalmology, Pharmacology, Studies | Leave a comment

Systems Biology (II)

Some observations from the book’s chapter 3 below:

“Without regulation biological processes would become progressively more and more chaotic. In living cells the primary source of information is genetic material. Studying the role of information in biology involves signaling (i.e. spatial and temporal transfer of information) and storage (preservation of information). Regarding the role of the genome we can distinguish three specific aspects of biological processes: steady-state genetics, which ensure cell-level and body homeostasis; genetics of development, which controls cell differentiation and genesis of the organism; and evolutionary genetics, which drives speciation. […] The ever growing demand for information, coupled with limited storage capacities, has resulted in a number of strategies for minimizing the quantity of the encoded information that must be preserved by living cells. In addition to combinatorial approaches based on noncontiguous genes structure, self-organization plays an important role in cellular machinery. Nonspecific interactions with the environment give rise to coherent structures despite the lack of any overt information store. These mechanisms, honed by evolution and ubiquitous in living organisms, reduce the need to directly encode large quantities of data by adopting a systemic approach to information management.”

Information is commonly understood as a transferable description of an event or object. Information transfer can be either spatial (communication, messaging or signaling) or temporal (implying storage). […] The larger the set of choices, the lower the likelihood [of] making the correct choice by accident and — correspondingly — the more information is needed to choose correctly. We can therefore state that an increase in the cardinality of a set (the number of its elements) corresponds to an increase in selection indeterminacy. This indeterminacy can be understood as a measure of “a priori ignorance”. […] Entropy determines the uncertainty inherent in a given system and therefore represents the relative difficulty of making the correct choice. For a set of possible events it reaches its maximum value if the relative probabilities of each event are equal. Any information input reduces entropy — we can therefore say that changes in entropy are a quantitative measure of information. […] Physical entropy is highest in a state of equilibrium, i.e. lack of spontaneity (G = 0,0) which effectively terminates the given reaction. Regulatory processes which counteract the tendency of physical systems to reach equilibrium must therefore oppose increases in entropy. It can be said that a steady inflow of information is a prerequisite of continued function in any organism. As selections are typically made at the entry point of a regulatory process, the concept of entropy may also be applied to information sources. This approach is useful in explaining the structure of regulatory systems which must be “designed” in a specific way, reducing uncertainty and enabling accurate, error-free decisions.

The fire ant exudes a pheromone which enables it to mark sources of food and trace its own path back to the colony. In this way, the ant conveys pathing information to other ants. The intensity of the chemical signal is proportional to the abundance of the source. Other ants can sense the pheromone from a distance of several (up to a dozen) centimeters and thus locate the source themselves. […] As can be expected, an increase in the entropy of the information source (i.e. the measure of ignorance) results in further development of regulatory systems — in this case, receptors capable of receiving signals and processing them to enable accurate decisions. Over time, the evolution of regulatory mechanisms increases their performance and precision. The purpose of various structures involved in such mechanisms can be explained on the grounds of information theory. The primary goal is to select the correct input signal, preserve its content and avoid or eliminate any errors.”

Genetic information stored in nucleotide sequences can be expressed and transmitted in two ways:
a. via replication (in cell division);
b. via transcription and translation (also called gene expression […]
)
Both processes act as effectors and can be triggered by certain biological signals transferred on request.
Gene expression can be defined as a sequence of events which lead to the synthesis of proteins or their products required for a particular function. In cell division, the goal of this process is to generate a copy of the entire genetic code (S phase), whereas in gene expression only selected fragments of DNA (those involved in the requested function) are transcribed and translated. […] Transcription calls for exposing a section of the cell’s genetic code and although its product (RNA) is short-lived, it can be recreated on demand, just like a carbon copy of a printed text. On the other hand, replication affects the entire genetic material contained in the cell and must conform to stringent precision requirements, particularly as the size of the genome increases.”

The magnitude of effort involved in replication of genetic code can be visualized by comparing the DNA chain to a zipper […]. Assuming that the zipper consists of three pairs of interlocking teeth per centimeter (300 per meter) and that the human genome is made up of 3 billion […] base pairs, the total length of our uncoiled DNA in “zipper form” would be equal to […] 10,000 km […] If we were to unfasten the zipper at a rate of 1 m per second, the entire unzipping process would take approximately 3 months […]. This comparison should impress upon the reader the length of the DNA chain and the precision with which individual nucleotides must be picked to ensure that the resulting code is an exact copy of the source. It should also be noted that for each base pair the polymerase enzyme needs to select an appropriate matching nucleotide from among four types of nucleotides present in the solution, and attach it to the chain (clearly, no such problem occurs in zippers). The reliability of an average enzyme is on the order of 10-3–10-4, meaning that one error occurs for every 1,000–10,000 interactions between the enzyme and its substrate. Given this figure, replication of 3*109 base pairs would introduce approximately 3 million errors (mutations) per genome, resulting in a highly inaccurate copy. Since the observed reliability of replication is far higher, we may assume that some corrective mechanisms are involved. Really, the remarkable precision of genetic replication is ensured by DNA repair processes, and in particular by the corrective properties of polymerase itself.

Many mutations are caused by the inherent chemical instability of nucleic acids: for example, cytosine may spontaneously convert to uracil. In the human genome such an event occurs approximately 100 times per day; however uracil is not normally encountered in DNA and its presence alerts defensive mechanisms which correct the error. Another type of mutation is spontaneous depurination, which also triggers its own, dedicated error correction procedure. Cells employ a large number of corrective mechanisms […] DNA repair mechanisms may be treated as an “immune system” which protects the genome from loss or corruption of genetic information. The unavoidable mutations which sometimes occur despite the presence of error correction-mechanisms can be masked due to doubled presentation (alleles) of genetic information. Thus, most mutations are recessive and not expressed in the phenotype. As the length of the DNA chain increases, mutations become more probable. It should be noted that the number of nucleotides in DNA is greater than the relative number of aminoacids participating in polypeptide chains. This is due to the fact that each aminoacid is encoded by exactly three nucleotides — a general principle which applies to all living organisms. […] Fidelity is, of course, fundamentally important in DNA replication as any harmful mutations introduced in its course are automatically passed on to all successive generations of cells. In contrast, transcription and translation processes can be more error-prone as their end products are relatively short-lived. Of note is the fact that faulty transcripts appear in relatively low quantities and usually do not affect cell functions, since regulatory processes ensure continued synthesis of the required substances until a suitable level of activity is reached. Nevertheless, it seems that reliable transcription of genetic material is sufficiently significant for cells to have developed appropriate proofreading mechanisms, similar to those which assist replication. […] the entire information pathway — starting with DNA and ending with active proteins — is protected against errors. We can conclude that fallibility is an inherent property of genetic information channels, and that in order to perform their intended function, these channels require error correction mechanisms.”

The discrete nature of genetic material is an important property which distinguishes prokaryotes from eukaryotes. […] The ability to select individual nucleotide fragments and construct sequences from predetermined “building blocks” results in high adaptability to environmental stimuli and is a fundamental aspect of evolution. The discontinuous nature of genes is evidenced by the presence of fragments which do not convey structural information (introns), as opposed to structure-encoding fragments (exons). The initial transcript (pre-mRNA) contains introns as well as exons. In order to provide a template for protein synthesis, it must undergo further processing (also known as splicing): introns must be cleaved and exon fragments attached to one another. […] Recognition of intron-exon boundaries is usually very precise, while the reattachment of adjacent exons is subject to some variability. Under certain conditions, alternative splicing may occur, where the ordering of the final product does not reflect the order in which exon sequences appear in the source chain. This greatly increases the number of potential mRNA combinations and thus the variety of resulting proteins. […] While access to energy sources is not a major problem, sources of information are usually far more difficult to manage — hence the universal tendency to limit the scope of direct (genetic) information storage. Reducing the length of genetic code enables efficient packing and enhances the efficiency of operations while at the same time decreasing the likelihood of errors. […] The number of genes identified in the human genome is lower than the number of distinct proteins by a factor of 4; a difference which can be attributed to alternative splicing. […] This mechanism increases the variety of protein structures without affecting core information storage, i.e. DNA sequences. […] Primitive organisms often possess nearly as many genes as humans, despite the essential differences between both groups. Interspecies diversity is primarily due to the properties of regulatory sequences.”

The discontinuous nature of genes is evolutionarily advantageous but comes at the expense of having to maintain a nucleus where such splicing processes can be safely conducted, in addition to efficient transport channels allowing transcripts to penetrate the nuclear membrane. While it is believed that at early stages of evolution RNA was the primary repository of genetic information, its present function can best be described as an information carrier. Since unguided proteins cannot ensure sufficient specificity of interaction with nucleic acids, protein-RNA complexes are used often in cases where specific fragments of genetic information need to be read. […] The use of RNA in protein complexes is common across all domains of the living world as it bridges the gap between discrete and continuous storage of genetic information.”

Epigenetic differentiation mechanisms are particularly important in embryonic development. […] Unlike the function of mature organisms, embryonic programming refers to structures which do not yet exist but which need to be created through cell proliferation and differentiation. […] Differentiation of cells results in phenotypic changes. This phenomenon is the primary difference between development genetics and steady-state genetics. Functional differences are not, however, associated with genomic changes: instead they are mediated by the transcriptome where certain genes are preferentially selected for transcription while others are suppressed. […] In a mature, specialized cell only a small portion of the transcribable genome is actually expressed. The remainder of the cell’s genetic material is said to be silenced. Gene silencing is a permanent condition. Under normal circumstances mature cells never alter their function, although such changes may be forced in a laboratory setting […] Cells which make up the embryo at a very early stage of development are pluripotent, meaning that their purpose can be freely determined and that all of their genetic information can potentially be expressed (under certain conditions). […] At each stage of the development process the scope of pluripotency is reduced until, ultimately, the cell becomes monopotent. Monopotency implies that the final function of the cell has already been determined, although the cell itself may still be immature. […] functional dissimilarities between specialized cells are not associated with genetic mutations but rather with selective silencing of genes. […] Most genes which determine biological functions have a biallelic representation (i.e. a representation consisting of two alleles). The remainder (approximately 10 % of genes) is inherited from one specific parent, as a result of partial or complete silencing of their sister alleles (called paternal or maternal imprinting) which occurs during gametogenesis. The suppression of a single copy of the X chromosome is a special case of this phenomenon.”

Evolutionary genetics is subject to two somewhat contradictory criteria. On the one hand, there is clear pressure on accurate and consistent preservation of biological functions and structures while on the other hand it is also important to permit gradual but persistent changes. […] the observable progression of adaptive traits which emerge as a result of evolution suggests a mechanism which promotes constructive changes over destructive ones. Mutational diversity cannot be considered truly random if it is limited to certain structures or functions. […] Approximately 50 % of the human genome consists of mobile segments, capable of migrating to various positions in the genome. These segments are called transposons and retrotransposons […] The mobility of genome fragments not only promotes mutations (by increasing the variability of DNA) but also affects the stability and packing of chromatin strands wherever such mobile sections are reintegrated with the genome. Under normal circumstances the activity of mobile sections is tempered by epigenetic mechanisms […]; however in certain situations gene mobility may be upregulated. In particular, it seems that in “prehistoric” (remote evolutionary) times such events occurred at a much faster pace, accelerating the rate of genetic changes and promoting rapid evolution. Cells can actively promote mutations by way of the so-called AID process (activity-dependent cytosine deamination). It is an enzymatic mechanism which converts cytosine into uracil, thereby triggering repair mechanisms and increasing the likelihood of mutations […] The existence of AID proves that cells themselves may trigger evolutionary changes and that the role of mutations in the emergence of new biological structures is not strictly passive.”

Regulatory mechanisms which receive signals characterized by high degrees of uncertainty, must be able to make informed choices to reduce the overall entropy of the system they control. This property is usually associated with development of information channels. Special structures ought to be exposed within information channels connecting systems of different character as for example linking transcription to translation or enabling transduction of signals through the cellular membrane. Examples of structures which convey highly entropic information are receptor systems associated with blood coagulation and immune responses. The regulatory mechanism which triggers an immune response relies on relatively simple effectors (complement factor enzymes, phages and killer cells) coupled to a highly evolved receptor system, represented by specific antibodies and organized set of cells. Compared to such advanced receptors the structures which register the concentration of a given product (e.g. glucose in blood) are rather primitive. Advanced receptors enable the immune system to recognize and verify information characterized by high degrees of uncertainty. […] In sequential processes it is usually the initial stage which poses the most problems and requires the most information to complete successfully. It should come as no surprise that the most advanced control loops are those associated with initial stages of biological pathways.”

February 10, 2018 Posted by | Biology, Books, Chemistry, Evolutionary biology, Genetics, Immunology, Medicine | Leave a comment

Endocrinology (part 3 – adrenal glands)

Some observations from chapter 3 below.

“The normal adrenal gland weigh 4-5g. The cortex represents 90% of the normal gland and surrounds the medulla. […] Glucocorticoid (cortisol […]) production occurs from the zona fasciculata, and adrenal androgens arise from the zona reticularis. Both of these are under the control of ACTH [see also my previous post about the book – US], which regulates both steroid synthesis and also adrenocortical growth. […] Mineralocorticoid (aldosterone […]) synthesis occurs in zona glomerulosa, predominantly under the control of the renin-angiotensin system […], although ACTH also contributes to its regulation. […] The adrenal gland […] also produces sex steroids in the form of dehydroepiandrostenedione (DHEA) and androstenedione. The synthetic pathway is under the control of ACTH. Urinary steroid profiling provides quantitative information on the biosynthetic and catabolic pathways. […] CT is the most widely used modality for imaging the adrenal glands. […] MRI can also reliably detect adrenal masses >5-10mm in diameter and, in some circumstances, provides additional information to CT […] PET can be useful in locating tumours and metastases. […] Adrenal vein sampling (AVS) […] can be useful to lateralize an adenoma or to differentiate an adenoma from bilateral hyperplasia. […] AVS is of particular value in lateralizing small aldosterone-producing adenomas that cannot easily be visualized on CT or MRI. […] The procedure should only be undertaken in patients in whom surgery is feasible and desired […] [and] should be carried out in specialist centres only; centres with <20 procedures per year have been shown to have poor success rates”.

“The majority of cases of mineralocorticoid excess are due to excess aldosterone production, […] typically associated with hypertension and hypokalemia. *Primary hyperaldosteronism is a disorder of autonomous aldosterone hypersecretion with suppressed renin levels. *Secondary hyperaldosteronism occurs when aldosterone hypersecretion occurs 2° [secondary, US] to elevated circulating renin levels. This is typical of heart failure, cirrhosis, or nephrotic syndrome but can also be due to renal artery stenosis and, occasionally, a very rare renin-producing tumour (reninoma). […] Primary hyperaldosteronism is present in around 10% of hypertensive patients. It is the most prevalent form of secondary hypertension. […] Aldosterone causes renal sodium retention and potassium loss. This results in expansion of body sodium content, leading to suppression of renal renin synthesis. The direct action of aldosterone on the distal nephron causes sodium retention and loss and hydrogen and potassium ions, resulting in a hypokalaemic alkalosis, although serum potassium […] may be normal in up to 50% of cases. Aldosterone has pathophysiological effects on a range of other tissues, causing cardiac fibrosis, vascular endothelial dysfunction, and nephrosclerosis. […] hypertension […] is often resistant to conventional therapy. […] Hypokalaemia is usually asymptomatic. […] Occasionally, the clinical syndrome of hyperaldosteronism is not associated with excess aldosterone. […] These conditions are rare.”

“Bilateral adrenal hyperplasia [make up] 60% [of cases of primary hyperaldosteronism]. […] Conn’s syndrome (aldosterone-producing adrenal adenoma) [make up] 35%. […] The pathophysiology of bilateral adrenal hyperplasia is not understood, and it is possible that it represents an extreme end of the spectrum of low renin essential hypertension. […] Aldosterone-producing carcinoma[s] [are] [r]are and usually associated with excessive secretion of other corticosteroids (cortisol, androgen, oestrogen). […] Indications [for screening include:] *Patients resistant to conventional antihypertensive medication (i.e. not controlled on three agents). *Hypertension associated with hypokalaemia […] *Hypertension developing before age of 40 years. […] Confirmation of autonomous aldosterone production is made by demonstrating failure to suppress aldosterone in face of sodium/volume loading. […] A number of tests have been described that are said to differentiate between the various subtypes of 1° [primary, US] aldosteronism […]. However, none of these are sufficiently specific to influence management decisions”.

“Laparoscopic adrenalectomy is the treatment of choice for aldosterone-secreting adenomas […] and laparoscopic adrenalectomy […] has become the procedure of choice for removal of most adrenal tumours. *Hypertension is cured in about 70%. *If it persists […], it is more amenable to medical treatment. *Overall, 50% become normotensive in 1 month and 70% within 1 year. […] Medical therapy remains an option for patients with bilateral disease and those with a solitary adrenal adenoma who are unlikely to be cured by surgery, who are unfit for operation, or who express a preference for medical management. *The mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist spironolactone […] has been used successfully for many years to treat hypertension and hypokalaemia associated with bilateral adrenal hyperplasia […] Side effects are common – particularly gynaecomastia and impotence in ♂, menstrual irregularities in ♀, and GI effects. […] Eplerenone […] is a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist without antiandrogen effects and hence greater selectivity and less side effects than spironolactone. *Alternative drugs include the potassium-sparing diuretics amiloride and triamterene.”

“Cushing’s syndrome results from chronic excess cortisol [see also my second post in this series] […] The causes may be classified as ACTH-dependent and ACTH-independent. […] ACTH-independent Cushing’s syndrome […] is due to adrenal tumours (benign and malignant), and is responsible for 10-15% of cases of Cushing’s syndrome. […] Benign adrenocortical adenomas (ACA) are usually encapsulated and <4cm in diameter. They are usually associated with pure glucocorticoid excess. *Adrenocortical carcinomas (ACC) are usually >6cm in diameter, […] and are not infrequently associated with local invasion and metastases at the time of diagnosis. Adrenal carcinomas are characteristically associated with the excess secretion of several hormones; most frequently found is the combination of cortisol and androgen (precursors) […] ACTH-dependent Cushing’s results in bilateral adrenal hyperplasia, thus one has to firmly differentiate between ACTH-dependent and independent causes of Cushing’s before assuming bilateral adrenal hyperplasia as the primary cause of disease. […] It is important to note that, in patients with adrenal carcinoma, there may also be features related to excessive androgen production in ♀ and also a relatively more rapid time course of development of the syndrome. […] Patients with ACTH-independent Cushing’s syndrome do not suppress cortisol […] on high-dose dexamethasone testing and fail to show a rise in cortisol and ACTH following administration of CRH. […] ACTH-independent causes are adrenal in origin, and the mainstay of further investigation is adrenal imaging by CT”.

“Adrenal adenomas, which are successfully treated with surgery, have a good prognosis, and recurrence is unlikely. […] Bilateral adrenalectomy [in the context of bilateral adrenal hyperplasia] is curative. Lifelong glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid treatment is [however] required. […] The prognosis for adrenal carcinoma is very poor despite surgery. Reports suggest a 5-year survival of 22% and median survival time of 14 months […] Treatment of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) should be carried out in a specialist centre, with expert surgeons, oncologists, and endocrinologists with extensive treatment in treating ACC. This improves survival.”

“Adrenal insufficiency [AI, US] is defined by the lack of cortisol, i.e. glucocorticoid deficiency, may be due to destruction of the adrenal cortex (1°, Addison’s disease and congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) […] or due to disordered pituitary and hypothalamic function (2°). […] *Permanent adrenal insufficiency is found in 5 in 10,000 population. *The most frequent cause is hypothalamic-pituitary damage, which is the cause of AI in 60% of affected patients. *The remaining 40% of cases are due to primary failure of the adrenal to synthesize cortisol, almost equal prevalence of Addison’s disease (mostly of autoimmune origin, prevalence 0.9-1.4 in 10,000) and congenital adrenal hyperplasia (0.7-1.0 in 10,000). *2° adrenal insufficiency due to suppression of pituitary-hypothalamic function by exogenously administered, supraphysiological glucocorticoid doses for treatment of, for example, COPD or rheumatoid arthritis, is much more common (50-200 in 10,000 population). However, adrenal function in these patients can recover”.

“[In primary AI] [a]drenal gland destruction or dysfunction occurs due to a disease process which usually involves all three zones of the adrenal cortex, resulting in inadequate glucocorticoid, mineralocorticoid, and adrenal androgen precursor secretion. The manifestations of insufficiency do not usually appear until at least 90% of the gland has been destroyed and are usually gradual in onset […] Acute adrenal insufficiency may occur in the context of acute septicaemia […] Mineralocorticoid deficiency leads to reduced sodium retention and hyponatraemia and hypotension […] Androgen deficiency presents in ♀ with reduced axillary and pubic hair and reduced libido. (Testicular production of androgens is more important in ♂). [In secondary AI] [i]nadequate ACTH results in deficient cortisol production (and ↓ androgens in ♀). […] Mineralocorticoid secretion remains normal […] The onset is usually gradual, with partial ACTH deficiency resulting in reduced response to stress. […] Lack of stimulation of skin MC1R due to ACTH deficiency results in pale skin appearance. […] [In 1° adrenal insufficiency] hyponatraemia is present in 90% and hyperkalaemia in 65%. […] Undetectable serum cortisol is diagnostic […], but the basal cortisol is often in the normal range. A cortisol >550nmol/L precludes the diagnosis. At times of acute stress, an inappropriately low cortisol is very suggestive of the diagnosis.”

“Autoimmune adrenalitis[:] Clinical features[:] *Anorexia and weight loss (>90%). *Tiredness. *Weakness – generalized, no particular muscle groups. […] Dizziness and postural hypotension. *GI symptoms – nausea and vomiting, abdominal pain, diarrhea. *Arthralgia and myalgia. […] *Mediated by humoral and cell-mediated immune mechanisms. Autoimmune insufficiency associated with polyglandular autoimmune syndrome is more common in ♀ (70%). *Adrenal cortex antibodies are present in the majority of patients at diagnosis, and […] they are still found in approximately 70% of patients 10 years later. Up to 20% patients/year with [positive] antibodies develop adrenal insufficiency. […] *Antiadrenal antibodies are found in <2% of patients with other autoimmune endocrine disease (Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, diabetes mellitus, autoimmune hypothyroidism, hypoparathyroidism, pernicious anemia). […] antibodies to other endocrine glands are commonly found in patients with autoimmune adrenal insufficiency […] However, the presence of antibodies does not predict subsequent manifestation of organ-specific autoimmunity. […] Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and autoimmune thyroid disease only rarely develop autoimmune adrenal insufficiency. Approximately 60% of patients with Addison’s disease have other autoimmune or endocrine disorders. […] The adrenals are small and atrophic in chronic autoimmune adrenalitis.”

“Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS) type 1[:] *Also known as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy, candidiasis, and ectodermal dystrophy (APECED). […] [C]hildhood onset. *Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. *Hypoparathyroidism (90%), 1° adrenal insufficiency (60%). *1° gonadal failure (41%) – usually after Addison’s diagnosis. *1° hypothyroidism. *Rarely hypopituitarism, diabetes insipidus, type 1 diabetes mellitus. […] APS type 2[:] *Adult onset. *Adrenal insufficiency (100%). 1° autoimmune thyroid disease (70%) […] Type 1 diabetes mellitus (5-20%) – often before Addison’s diagnosis. *1° gonadal failure in affected women (5-20%). […] Schmidt’s syndrome: *Addison’s disease, and *Autoimmune hypothyroidism. *Carpenter syndrome: *Addison’s disease, and *Autoimmune hypothyroidism, and/or *Type 1 diabetes mellitus.”

“An adrenal incidentaloma is an adrenal mass that is discovered incidentally upon imaging […] carried out for reasons other than a suspected adrenal pathology.  […] *Autopsy studies suggest incidence prevalence of adrenal masses of 1-6% in the general population. *Imagining studies suggest that adrenal masses are present 2-3% in the general population. Incidence increases with ageing, and 8-10% of 70-year olds harbour an adrenal mass. […] It is important to determine whether the incidentally discovered adrenal mass is: *Malignant. *Functioning and associated with excess hormonal secretion.”

January 17, 2018 Posted by | Books, Cancer/oncology, Diabetes, Epidemiology, Immunology, Medicine, Nephrology, Pharmacology | Leave a comment

A few diabetes papers of interest

i. Chronic Fatigue in Type 1 Diabetes: Highly Prevalent but Not Explained by Hyperglycemia or Glucose Variability.

“Fatigue is a classical symptom of hyperglycemia, but the relationship between chronic fatigue and diabetes has not been systematically studied. […] glucose control [in diabetics] is often suboptimal with persistent episodes of hyperglycemia that may result in sustained fatigue. Fatigue may also sustain in diabetic patients because it is associated with the presence of a chronic disease, as has been demonstrated in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and various neuromuscular disorders (2,3).

It is important to distinguish between acute and chronic fatigue, because chronic fatigue, defined as severe fatigue that persists for at least 6 months, leads to substantial impairments in patients’ daily functioning (4,5). In contrast, acute fatigue can largely vary during the day and generally does not cause functional impairments.

Literature provides limited evidence for higher levels of fatigue in diabetic patients (6,7), but its chronicity, impact, and determinants are unknown. In various chronic diseases, it has been proven useful to distinguish between precipitating and perpetuating factors of chronic fatigue (3,8). Illness-related factors trigger acute fatigue, while other factors, often cognitions and behaviors, cause fatigue to persist. Sleep disturbances, low self-efficacy concerning fatigue, reduced physical activity, and a strong focus on fatigue are examples of these fatigue-perpetuating factors (810). An episode of hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia could trigger acute fatigue for diabetic patients (11,12). However, variations in blood glucose levels might also contribute to chronic fatigue, because these variations continuously occur.

The current study had two aims. First, we investigated the prevalence and impact of chronic fatigue in a large sample of type 1 diabetic (T1DM) patients and compared the results to a group of age- and sex-matched population-based controls. Secondly, we searched for potential determinants of chronic fatigue in T1DM.”

“A significantly higher percentage of T1DM patients were chronically fatigued (40%; 95% CI 34–47%) than matched controls (7%; 95% CI 3–10%). Mean fatigue severity was also significantly higher in T1DM patients (31 ± 14) compared with matched controls (17 ± 9; P < 0.001). T1DM patients with a comorbidity_mr [a comorbidity affecting patients’ daily functioning, based on medical records – US] or clinically relevant depressive symptoms [based on scores on the Beck Depression Inventory for Primary Care – US] were significantly more often chronically fatigued than patients without a comorbidity_mr (55 vs. 36%; P = 0.014) or without clinically relevant depressive symptoms (88 vs. 31%; P < 0.001). Patients who reported neuropathy, nephropathy, or cardiovascular disease as complications of diabetes were more often chronically fatigued […] Chronically fatigued T1DM patients were significantly more impaired compared with nonchronically fatigued T1DM patients on all aspects of daily functioning […]. Fatigue was the most troublesome symptom of the 34 assessed diabetes-related symptoms. The five most troublesome symptoms were overall sense of fatigue, lack of energy, increasing fatigue in the course of the day, fatigue in the morning when getting up, and sleepiness or drowsiness”.

“This study establishes that chronic fatigue is highly prevalent and clinically relevant in T1DM patients. While current blood glucose level was only weakly associated with chronic fatigue, cognitive behavioral factors were by far the strongest potential determinants.”

“Another study found that type 2 diabetic, but not T1DM, patients had higher levels of fatigue compared with healthy controls (7). This apparent discrepancy may be explained by the relatively small sample size of this latter study, potential selection bias (patients were not randomly selected), and the use of a different fatigue questionnaire.”

“Not only was chronic fatigue highly prevalent, fatigue also had a large impact on T1DM patients. Chronically fatigued T1DM patients had more functional impairments than nonchronically fatigued patients, and T1DM patients considered fatigue as the most burdensome diabetes-related symptom.

Contrary to what was expected, there was at best a weak relationship between blood glucose level and chronic fatigue. Chronically fatigued T1DM patients spent slightly less time in hypoglycemia, but average glucose levels, glucose variability, hyperglycemia, or HbA1c were not related to chronic fatigue. In type 2 diabetes mellitus also, no relationship was found between fatigue and HbA1c (7).”

“Regarding demographic characteristics, current health status, diabetes-related factors, and fatigue-related cognitions and behaviors as potential determinants of chronic fatigue, we found that sleeping problems, physical activity, self-efficacy concerning fatigue, age, depression, and pain were significantly associated with chronic fatigue in T1DM. Although depression was strongly related, it could not completely explain the presence of chronic fatigue (38), as 31% was chronically fatigued without having clinically relevant depressive symptoms.”

Some comments may be worth adding here. It’s important to note to people who may not be aware of this that although chronic fatigue is a weird entity that’s hard to get a handle on (and, to be frank, is somewhat controversial), specific organic causes have been identified that greatly increases the risk. Many survivors of cancer experience chronic fatigue (see e.g. this paper, or wikipedia), and chronic fatigue is also not uncommon in a kidney failure setting (“The silence of renal disease creeps up on us (doctors and patients). Do not dismiss odd chronic symptoms such as fatigue or ‘not being quite with it’ without considering checking renal function” (Oxford Handbook of Clinical Medicine, 9th edition. My italics – US)). As observed above, linkage with RA and some neuromuscular disorders has also been observed. The brief discussion of related topics in Houghton & Grey made it clear to me that some people with chronic fatigue are almost certainly suffering from an organic illness which has not been diagnosed or treated. Here’s a relevant quote from that book’s coverage: “it is unusual to find a definite organic cause for fatigue. However, consider anaemia, thyroid dysfunction, Addison’s disease and hypopituitarism.” It’s sort of neat, if you think about the potential diabetes-fatigue link investigated by the guys above, that some of these diseases are likely to be relevant, as type 1 diabetics are more likely to develop them (anemia is not linked to diabetes, as far as I know, and I believe the relationship between autoimmune hypophysitis – which is a cause of hypopituitarism – and type 1 diabetes is at best unclear, but the others are definitely involved) due to their development being caused by some of the same genetic mutations which cause type 1 diabetes; the combinations of some of these diseases even have fancy names of their own, like ‘Type I Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome’ and ‘Schmidt Syndrome’ (if you’re interested here are a couple of medscape links). It’s noteworthy that although most of these diseases are uncommon in the general population, their incidence/prevalence is likely to be greatly increased in type 1 diabetics due to the common genetic pathways at play (variants regulating T-cell function seem to be important, but there’s no need to go into these details here). Sperling et al. note in their book that: “Hypothyroid or hyperthyroid AITD [autoimmune thyroid disease] has been observed in 10–24% of patients with type 1 diabetes”. In one series including 151 patients with APS [/PAS]-2, when they looked at disease combinations they found that: “Of combinations of the component diseases, [type 1] diabetes with thyroid disease was the most common, occurring in 33%. The second, diabetes with adrenal insufficiency, made up 15%” (same source).

It seems from estimates like these likely that a not unsubstantial proportion of type 1 diabetics over time go on to develop other health problems that might if unaddressed/undiagnosed cause fatigue, and this may in my opinion be a potentially much more important cause than direct metabolic effects such as hyperglycemia, or chronic inflammation. If this is the case you’d however expect to see a substantial sex difference, as the autoimmune syndromes are in general much more likely to hit females than males. I’m not completely sure how to interpret a few of the results reported, but to me it doesn’t look like the sex differences in this study are anywhere near ‘large enough’ to support such an explanatory model, though. Another big problem is also that fatigue seems to be more common in young patients, which is weird; most long-term complications display significant (positive) duration dependence, and when diabetes is a component of an autoimmune syndrome diabetes tend to develop first, with other diseases hitting later, usually in middle age. Duration and age are strongly correlated, and a negative duration dependence in a diabetes complication setting is a surprising and unusual finding that needs to be explained, badly; it’s unexpected and may in my opinion be the sign of a poor disease model. It’d make more sense for disease-related fatigue to present late, rather than early, I don’t really know what to make of that negative age gradient. ‘More studies needed’ (preferably by people familiar with those autoimmune syndromes..), etc…

ii. Risk for End-Stage Renal Disease Over 25 Years in the Population-Based WESDR Cohort.

“It is well known that diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in many regions, including the U.S. (1). Type 1 diabetes accounts for >45,000 cases of ESRD per year (2), and the incidence may be higher than in people with type 2 diabetes (3). Despite this, there are few population-based data available regarding the prevalence and incidence of ESRD in people with type 1 diabetes in the U.S. (4). A declining incidence of ESRD has been suggested by findings of lower incidence with increasing calendar year of diagnosis and in comparison with older reports in some studies in Europe and the U.S. (58). This is consistent with better diabetes management tools becoming available and increased renoprotective efforts, including the greater use of ACE inhibitors and angiotensin type II receptor blockers, over the past two to three decades (9). Conversely, no reduction in the incidence of ESRD across enrollment cohorts was found in a recent clinic-based study (9). Further, an increase in ESRD has been suggested for older but not younger people (9). Recent improvements in diabetes care have been suggested to delay rather than prevent the development of renal disease in people with type 1 diabetes (4).

A decrease in the prevalence of proliferative retinopathy by increasing calendar year of type 1 diabetes diagnosis was previously reported in the Wisconsin Epidemiologic Study of Diabetic Retinopathy (WESDR) cohort (10); therefore, we sought to determine if a similar pattern of decline in ESRD would be evident over 25 years of follow-up. Further, we investigated factors that may mediate a possible decline in ESRD as well as other factors associated with incident ESRD over time.”

“At baseline, 99% of WESDR cohort members were white and 51% were male. Individuals were 3–79 years of age (mean 29) with diabetes duration of 0–59 years (mean 15), diagnosed between 1922 and 1980. Four percent of individuals used three or more daily insulin injections and none used an insulin pump. Mean HbA1c was 10.1% (87 mmol/mol). Only 16% were using an antihypertensive medication, none was using an ACE inhibitor, and 3% reported a history of renal transplant or dialysis (ESRD). At 25 years, 514 individuals participated (52% of original cohort at baseline, n = 996) and 367 were deceased (37% of baseline). Mean HbA1c was much lower than at baseline (7.5%, 58 mmol/mol), the decline likely due to the improvements in diabetes care, with 80% of participants using intensive insulin management (three or more daily insulin injections or insulin pump). The decline in HbA1c was steady, becoming slightly steeper following the results of the DCCT (25). Overall, at the 25-year follow-up, 47% had proliferative retinopathy, 53% used aspirin daily, and 54% reported taking antihypertensive medications, with the majority (87%) using an ACE inhibitor. Thirteen percent reported a history of ESRD.”

“Prevalence of ESRD was negligible until 15 years of diabetes duration and then steadily increased with 5, 8, 10, 13, and 14% reporting ESRD by 15–19, 20–24, 25–29, 30–34, and 35+ years of diabetes duration, respectively. […] After 15 years of diagnosis, prevalence of ESRD increased with duration in people diagnosed from 1960 to 1980, with the lowest increase in people with the most recent diagnosis. People diagnosed from 1922 to 1959 had consistent rather than increasing levels of ESRD with duration of 20+ years. If not for their greater mortality (at the 25-year follow-up, 48% of the deceased had been diagnosed prior to 1960), an increase with duration may have also been observed.

From baseline, the unadjusted cumulative 25-year incidence of ESRD was 17.9% (95% CI 14.3–21.5) in males, 10.3% (7.4–13.2) in females, and 14.2% (11.9–16.5) overall. For those diagnosed in 1970–1980, the cumulative incidence at 14, 20, and 25 years of follow-up (or ∼15–25, 20–30, and 25–35 years diabetes duration) was 5.2, 7.9, and 9.3%, respectively. At 14, 20, and 25 years of follow-up (or 35, 40, and 45 up to 65+ years diabetes duration), the cumulative incidence in those diagnosed during 1922–1969 was 13.6, 16.3, and 18.8%, respectively, consistent with the greater prevalence observed for these diagnosis periods at longer duration of diabetes.”

“The unadjusted hazard of ESRD was reduced by 70% among those diagnosed in 1970–1980 as compared with those in 1922–1969 (HR 0.29 [95% CI 0.19–0.44]). Duration (by 10%) and HbA1c (by an additional 10%) partially mediated this association […] Blood pressure and antihypertensive medication use each further attenuated the association. When fully adjusted for these and [other risk factors included in the model], period of diagnosis was no longer significant (HR 0.89 [0.55–1.45]). Sensitivity analyses for the hazard of incident ESRD or death due to renal disease showed similar findings […] The most parsimonious model included diabetes duration, HbA1c, age, sex, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and history of antihypertensive medication […]. A 32% increased risk for incident ESRD was found per increasing year of diabetes duration at 0–15 years (HR 1.32 per year [95% CI 1.16–1.51]). The hazard plateaued (1.01 per year [0.98–1.05]) after 15 years of duration of diabetes. Hazard of ESRD increased with increasing HbA1c (1.28 per 1% or 10.9 mmol/mol increase [1.14–1.45]) and blood pressure (1.51 per 10 mmHg increase in systolic pressure [1.35–1.68]; 1.12 per 5 mmHg increase in diastolic pressure [1.01–1.23]). Use of antihypertensive medications increased the hazard of incident ESRD nearly fivefold [this finding is almost certainly due to confounding by indication, as also noted by the authors later on in the paper – US], and males had approximately two times the risk as compared with females. […] Having proliferative retinopathy was strongly associated with increased risk (HR 5.91 [3.00–11.6]) and attenuated the association between sex and ESRD.”

“The current investigation […] sought to provide much-needed information on the prevalence and incidence of ESRD and associated risk specific to people with type 1 diabetes. Consistent with a few previous studies (5,7,8), we observed decreased prevalence and incidence of ESRD among individuals with type 1 diabetes diagnosed in the 1970s compared with prior to 1970. The Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications (EDC) Study, another large cohort of people with type 1 diabetes followed over a long period of time, reported cumulative incidence rates of 2–6% for those diagnosed after 1970 and with similar duration (7), comparable to our findings. Slightly higher cumulative incidence (7–13%) reported from older studies at slightly lower duration also supports a decrease in incidence of ESRD (2830). Cumulative incidences through 30 years in European cohorts were even lower (3.3% in Sweden [6] and 7.8% in Finland [5]), compared with the 9.3% noted for those diagnosed during 1970–1980 in the WESDR cohort. The lower incidence could be associated with nationally organized care, especially in Sweden where a nationwide intensive diabetes management treatment program was implemented at least a decade earlier than recommendations for intensive care followed from the results of the DCCT in the U.S.”

“We noted an increased risk of incident ESRD in the first 15 years of diabetes not evident at longer durations. This pattern also demonstrated by others could be due to a greater earlier risk among people most genetically susceptible, as only a subset of individuals with type 1 diabetes will develop renal disease (27,28). The risk plateau associated with greater durations of diabetes and lower risk associated with increasing age may also reflect more death at longer durations and older ages. […] Because age and duration are highly correlated, we observed a positive association between age and ESRD only in univariate analyses, without adjustment for duration. The lack of adjustment for diabetes duration may have, in part, explained the increasing incidence of ESRD shown with age for some people in a recent investigation (9). Adjustment for both age and duration was found appropriate after testing for collinearity in the current analysis.”

In conclusion, this U.S. population-based report showed a lower prevalence and incidence of ESRD among those more recently diagnosed, explained by improvements in glycemic and blood pressure control over the last several decades. Even lower rates may be expected for those diagnosed during the current era of diabetes care. Intensive diabetes management, especially for glycemic control, remains important even in long-standing diabetes as potentially delaying the development of ESRD.

iii. Earlier Onset of Complications in Youth With Type 2 Diabetes.

The prevalence of type 2 diabetes in youth is increasing worldwide, coinciding with the rising obesity epidemic (1,2). […] Diabetes is associated with both microvascular and macrovascular complications. The evolution of these complications has been well described in type 1 diabetes (6) and in adult type 2 diabetes (7), wherein significant complications typically manifest 15–20 years after diagnosis (8). Because type 2 diabetes is a relatively new disease in children (first described in the 1980s), long-term outcome data on complications are scant, and risk factors for the development of complications are incompletely understood. The available literature suggests that development of complications in youth with type 2 diabetes may be more rapid than in adults, thus afflicting individuals at the height of their individual and social productivity (9). […] A small but notable proportion of type 2 diabetes is associated with a polymorphism of hepatic nuclear factor (HNF)-1α, a transcription factor expressed in many tissues […] It is not yet known what effect the HNF-1α polymorphism has on the risk of complications associated with diabetes.”

“The main objective of the current study was to describe the time course and risk factors for microvascular complications (nephropathy, retinopathy, and neuropathy) and macrovascular complications (cardiac, cerebrovascular, and peripheral vascular diseases) in a large cohort of youth [diagnosed with type 2 diabetes] who have been carefully followed for >20 years and to compare this evolution with that of youth with type 1 diabetes. We also compared vascular complications in the youth with type 2 diabetes with nondiabetic control youth. Finally, we addressed the impact of HNF-1α G319S on the evolution of complications in young patients with type 2 diabetes.”

“All prevalent cases of type 2 diabetes and type 1 diabetes (control group 1) seen between January 1986 and March 2007 in the DER-CA for youth aged 1–18 years were included. […] The final type 2 diabetes cohort included 342 youth, and the type 1 diabetes control group included 1,011. The no diabetes control cohort comprised 1,710 youth matched to the type 2 diabetes cohort from the repository […] Compared with the youth with type 1 diabetes, the youth with type 2 diabetes were, on average, older at the time of diagnosis and more likely to be female. They were more likely to have a higher BMIz, live in a rural area, have a low SES, and have albuminuria at diagnosis. […] one-half of the type 2 diabetes group was either a heterozygote (GS) or a homozygote (SS) for the HNF-1α polymorphism […] At the time of the last available follow-up in the DER-CA, the youth with diabetes were, on average, between 15 and 16 years of age. […] The median follow-up times in the repository were 4.4 (range 0–27.4) years for youth with type 2 diabetes, 6.7 ( 0–28.2) years for youth with type 1 diabetes, and 6.0 (0–29.9) years for nondiabetic control youth.”

“After controlling for low SES, sex, and BMIz, the risk associated with type 2 versus type 1 diabetes of any complication was an HR of 1.47 (1.02–2.12, P = 0.04). […] In the univariate analysis, youth with type 2 diabetes were at significantly higher risk of developing any vascular (HR 6.15 [4.26–8.87], P < 0.0001), microvascular (6.26 [4.32–9.10], P < 0.0001), or macrovascular (4.44 [1.71–11.52], P < 0.0001) disease compared with control youth without diabetes. In addition, the youth with type 2 diabetes had an increased risk of opthalmologic (19.49 [9.75–39.00], P < 0.0001), renal (16.13 [7.66–33.99], P < 0.0001), and neurologic (2.93 [1.79–4.80], P ≤ 0.001) disease. There were few cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and peripheral vascular disease events in all groups (five or fewer events per group). Despite this, there was still a statistically significant higher risk of peripheral vascular disease in the type 2 diabetes group (6.25 [1.68–23.28], P = 0.006).”

“Differences in renal and neurologic complications between the two diabetes groups began to occur before 5 years postdiagnosis, whereas differences in ophthalmologic complications began 10 years postdiagnosis. […] Both cardiovascular and cerebrovascular complications were rare in both groups, but peripheral vascular complications began to occur 15 years after diagnosis in the type 2 diabetes group […] The presence of HNF-1α G319S polymorphism in youth with type 2 diabetes was found to be protective of complications. […] Overall, major complications were rare in the type 1 diabetes group, but they occurred in 1.1% of the type 2 diabetes cohort at 10 years, in 26.0% at 15 years, and in 47.9% at 20 years after diagnosis (P < 0.001) […] youth with type 2 diabetes have a higher risk of any complication than youth with type 1 diabetes and nondiabetic control youth. […] The time to both renal and neurologic complications was significantly shorter in youth with type 2 diabetes than in control youth, whereas differences were not significant with respect to opthalmologic and cardiovascular complications between cohorts. […] The current study is consistent with the literature, which has shown high rates of cardiovascular risk factors in youth with type 2 diabetes. However, despite the high prevalence of risk, this study reports low rates of clinical events. Because the median follow-up time was between 5 and 8 years, it is possible that a longer follow-up period would be required to correctly evaluate macrovascular outcomes in young adults. Also possible is that diagnoses of mild disease are not being made because of a low index of suspicion in 20- and 30-year-old patients.”

In conclusion, youth with type 2 diabetes have an increased risk of complications early in the course of their disease. Microvascular complications and cardiovascular risk factors are highly prevalent, whereas macrovascular complications are rare in young adulthood. HbA1c is an important modifiable risk factor; thus, optimizing glycemic control should remain an important goal of therapy.”

iv. HbA1c and Coronary Heart Disease Risk Among Diabetic Patients.

“We prospectively investigated the association of HbA1c at baseline and during follow-up with CHD risk among 17,510 African American and 12,592 white patients with type 2 diabetes. […] During a mean follow-up of 6.0 years, 7,258 incident CHD cases were identified. The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios of CHD associated with different levels of HbA1c at baseline (<6.0 [reference group], 6.0–6.9, 7.0–7.9, 8.0–8.9, 9.0–9.9, 10.0–10.9, and ≥11.0%) were 1.00, 1.07 (95% CI 0.97–1.18), 1.16 (1.04–1.31), 1.15 (1.01–1.32), 1.26 (1.09–1.45), 1.27 (1.09–1.48), and 1.24 (1.10–1.40) (P trend = 0.002) for African Americans and 1.00, 1.04 (0.94–1.14), 1.15 (1.03–1.28), 1.29 (1.13–1.46), 1.41 (1.22–1.62), 1.34 (1.14–1.57), and 1.44 (1.26–1.65) (P trend <0.001) for white patients, respectively. The graded association of HbA1c during follow-up with CHD risk was observed among both African American and white diabetic patients (all P trend <0.001). Each one percentage increase of HbA1c was associated with a greater increase in CHD risk in white versus African American diabetic patients. When stratified by sex, age, smoking status, use of glucose-lowering agents, and income, this graded association of HbA1c with CHD was still present. […] The current study in a low-income population suggests a graded positive association between HbA1c at baseline and during follow-up with the risk of CHD among both African American and white diabetic patients with low socioeconomic status.”

A few more observations from the conclusions:

“Diabetic patients experience high mortality from cardiovascular causes (2). Observational studies have confirmed the continuous and positive association between glycemic control and the risk of cardiovascular disease among diabetic patients (4,5). But the findings from RCTs are sometimes uncertain. Three large RCTs (79) designed primarily to determine whether targeting different glucose levels can reduce the risk of cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes failed to confirm the benefit. Several reasons for the inconsistency of these studies can be considered. First, small sample sizes, short follow-up duration, and few CHD cases in some RCTs may limit the statistical power. Second, most epidemiological studies only assess a single baseline measurement of HbA1c with CHD risk, which may produce potential bias. The recent analysis of 10 years of posttrial follow-up of the UKPDS showed continued reductions for myocardial infarction and death from all causes despite an early loss of glycemic differences (10). The scientific evidence from RCTs was not sufficient to generate strong recommendations for clinical practice. Thus, consensus groups (AHA, ACC, and ADA) have provided a conservative endorsement (class IIb recommendation, level of evidence A) for the cardiovascular benefits of glycemic control (11). In the absence of conclusive evidence from RCTs, observational epidemiological studies might provide useful information to clarify the relationship between glycemia and CHD risk. In the current study with 30,102 participants with diabetes and 7,258 incident CHD cases during a mean follow-up of 6.0 years, we found a graded positive association by various HbA1c intervals of clinical relevance or by using HbA1c as a continuous variable at baseline and during follow-up with CHD risk among both African American and white diabetic patients. Each one percentage increase in baseline and follow-up HbA1c was associated with a 2 and 5% increased risk of CHD in African American and 6 and 11% in white diabetic patients. Each one percentage increase of HbA1c was associated with a greater increase in CHD risk in white versus African American diabetic patients.”

v. Blood Viscosity in Subjects With Normoglycemia and Prediabetes.

“Blood viscosity (BV) is the force that counteracts the free sliding of the blood layers within the circulation and depends on the internal cohesion between the molecules and the cells. Abnormally high BV can have several negative effects: the heart is overloaded to pump blood in the vascular bed, and the blood itself, more viscous, can damage the vessel wall. Furthermore, according to Poiseuille’s law (1), BV is inversely related to flow and might therefore reduce the delivery of insulin and glucose to peripheral tissues, leading to insulin resistance or diabetes (25).

It is generally accepted that BV is increased in diabetic patients (68). Although the reasons for this alteration are still under investigation, it is believed that the increase in osmolarity causes increased capillary permeability and, consequently, increased hematocrit and viscosity (9). It has also been suggested that the osmotic diuresis, consequence of hyperglycemia, could contribute to reduce plasma volume and increase hematocrit (10).

Cross-sectional studies have also supported a link between BV, hematocrit, and insulin resistance (1117). Recently, a large prospective study has demonstrated that BV and hematocrit are risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Subjects in the highest quartile of BV were >60% more likely to develop diabetes than their counterparts in the lowest quartile (18). This finding confirms previous observations obtained in smaller or selected populations, in which the association between hemoglobin or hematocrit and occurrence of type 2 diabetes was investigated (1922).

These observations suggest that the elevation in BV may be very early, well before the onset of diabetes, but definite data in subjects with normal glucose or prediabetes are missing. In the current study, we evaluated the relationship between BV and blood glucose in subjects with normal glucose or prediabetes in order to verify whether alterations in viscosity are appreciable in these subjects and at which blood glucose concentration they appear.”

“According to blood glucose levels, participants were divided into three groups: group A, blood glucose <90 mg/dL; group B, blood glucose between 90 and 99 mg/dL; and group C, blood glucose between 100 and 125 mg/dL. […] Hematocrit (P < 0.05) and BV (P between 0.01 and 0.001) were significantly higher in subjects with prediabetes and in those with blood glucose ranging from 90 to 99 mg/dL compared with subjects with blood glucose <90 mg/dL. […] The current study shows, for the first time, a direct relationship between BV and blood glucose in nondiabetic subjects. It also suggests that, even within glucose values ​​considered completely normal, individuals with higher blood glucose levels have increases in BV comparable with those observed in subjects with prediabetes. […] Overall, changes in viscosity in diabetic patients are accepted as common and as a result of the disease. However, the relationship between blood glucose, diabetes, and viscosity may be much more complex. […] the main finding of the study is that BV significantly increases already at high-normal blood glucose levels, independently of other common determinants of hemorheology. Intervention studies are needed to verify whether changes in BV can influence the development of type 2 diabetes.”

vi. Higher Relative Risk for Multiple Sclerosis in a Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetic Population: Analysis From DPV Database.

“Type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis (MS) are organ-specific inflammatory diseases, which result from an autoimmune attack against either pancreatic β-cells or the central nervous system; a combined appearance has been described repeatedly (13). For children and adolescents below the age of 21 years, the prevalence of type 1 diabetes in Germany and Austria is ∼19.4 cases per 100,000 population, and for MS it is 7–10 per 100,000 population (46). A Danish cohort study revealed a three times higher risk for the development of MS in patients with type 1 diabetes (7). Further, an Italian study conducted in Sardinia showed a five times higher risk for the development of type 1 diabetes in MS patients (8,9). An American study on female adults in whom diabetes developed before the age of 21 years yielded an up to 20 times higher risk for the development of MS (10).

These findings support the hypothesis of clustering between type 1 diabetes and MS. The pathogenesis behind this association is still unclear, but T-cell cross-reactivity was discussed as well as shared disease associations due to the HLA-DRB1-DQB1 gene loci […] The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of MS in a diabetic population and to look for possible factors related to the co-occurrence of MS in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes using a large multicenter survey from the Diabetes Patienten Verlaufsdokumentation (DPV) database.”

“We used a large database of pediatric and adolescent type 1 diabetic patients to analyze the RR of MS co-occurrence. The DPV database includes ∼98% of the pediatric diabetic population in Germany and Austria below the age of 21 years. In children and adolescents, the RR for MS in type 1 diabetes was estimated to be three to almost five times higher in comparison with the healthy population.”

November 2, 2017 Posted by | Cardiology, Diabetes, Epidemiology, Genetics, Immunology, Medicine, Nephrology, Statistics, Studies | Leave a comment

A few diabetes papers of interest

i. Neurocognitive Functioning in Children and Adolescents at the Time of Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosis: Associations With Glycemic Control 1 Year After Diagnosis.

“Children and youth with type 1 diabetes are at risk for developing neurocognitive dysfunction, especially in the areas of psychomotor speed, attention/executive functioning, and visuomotor integration (1,2). Most research suggests that deficits emerge over time, perhaps in response to the cumulative effect of glycemic extremes (36). However, the idea that cognitive changes emerge gradually has been challenged (79). Ryan (9) argued that if diabetes has a cumulative effect on cognition, cognitive test performance should be positively correlated with illness duration. Yet he found comparable deficits in psychomotor speed (the most commonly noted area of deficit) in adolescents and young adults with illness duration ranging from 6 to 25 years. He therefore proposed a diathesis model in which cognitive declines in diabetes are especially likely to occur in more vulnerable patients, at crucial periods, in response to illness-related events (e.g., severe hyperglycemia) known to have an impact on the central nervous system (CNS) (8). This model accounts for the finding that cognitive deficits are more likely in children with early-onset diabetes, and for the accelerated cognitive aging seen in diabetic individuals later in life (7). A third hypothesized crucial period is the time leading up to diabetes diagnosis, during which severe fluctuations in blood glucose and persistent hyperglycemia often occur. Concurrent changes in blood-brain barrier permeability could result in a flood of glucose into the brain, with neurotoxic effects (9).”

“In the current study, we report neuropsychological test findings for children and adolescents tested within 3 days of diabetes diagnosis. The purpose of the study was to determine whether neurocognitive impairments are detectable at diagnosis, as predicted by the diathesis hypothesis. We hypothesized that performance on tests of psychomotor speed, visuomotor integration, and attention/executive functioning would be significantly below normative expectations, and that differences would be greater in children with earlier disease onset. We also predicted that diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a primary cause of diabetes-related neurological morbidity (12) and a likely proxy for severe peri-onset hyperglycemia, would be associated with poorer performance.”

“Charts were reviewed for 147 children/adolescents aged 5–18 years (mean = 10.4 ± 3.2 years) who completed a short neuropsychological screening during their inpatient hospitalization for new-onset type 1 diabetes, as part of a pilot clinical program intended to identify patients in need of further neuropsychological evaluation. Participants were patients at a large urban children’s hospital in the southwestern U.S. […] Compared with normative expectations, children/youth with type 1 diabetes performed significantly worse on GPD, GPN, VMI, and FAS (P < 0.0001 in all cases), with large decrements evident on all four measures (Fig. 1). A small but significant effect was also evident in DSB (P = 0.022). High incidence of impairment was evident on all neuropsychological tasks completed by older participants (aged 9–18 years) except DSF/DSB (Fig. 2).”

“Deficits in neurocognitive functioning were evident in children and adolescents within days of type 1 diabetes diagnosis. Participants performed >1 SD below normative expectations in bilateral psychomotor speed (GP) and 0.7–0.8 SDs below expected performance in visuomotor integration (VMI) and phonemic fluency (FAS). Incidence of impairment was much higher than normative expectations on all tasks except DSF/DSB. For example, >20% of youth were impaired in dominant hand fine-motor control, and >30% were impaired with their nondominant hand. These findings provide provisional support for Ryan’s hypothesis (79) that the peri-onset period may be a time of significant cognitive vulnerability.

Importantly, deficits were not evident on all measures. Performance on measures of attention/executive functioning (TMT-A, TMT-B, DSF, and DSB) was largely consistent with normative expectations, as was reading ability (WRAT-4), suggesting that the below-average performance in other areas was not likely due to malaise or fatigue. Depressive symptoms at diagnosis were associated with performance on TMT-B and FAS, but not on other measures. Thus, it seems unlikely that depressive symptoms accounted for the observed motor slowing.

Instead, the findings suggest that the visual-motor system may be especially vulnerable to early effects of type 1 diabetes. This interpretation is especially compelling given that psychomotor impairment is the most consistently reported long-term cognitive effect of type 1 diabetes. The sensitivity of the visual-motor system at diabetes diagnosis is consistent with a growing body of neuroimaging research implicating posterior white matter tracts and associated gray matter regions (particularly cuneus/precuneus) as areas of vulnerability in type 1 diabetes (3032). These regions form part of the neural system responsible for integrating visual inputs with motor outputs, and in adults with type 1 diabetes, structural pathology in these regions is directly correlated to performance on GP [grooved pegboard test] (30,31). Arbelaez et al. (33) noted that these brain areas form part of the “default network” (34), a system engaged during internally focused cognition that has high resting glucose metabolism and may be especially vulnerable to glucose variability.”

“It should be noted that previous studies (e.g., Northam et al. [3]) have not found evidence of neurocognitive dysfunction around the time of diabetes diagnosis. This may be due to study differences in measures, outcomes, and/or time frame. We know of no other studies that completed neuropsychological testing within days of diagnosis. Given our time frame, it is possible that our findings reflect transient effects rather than more permanent changes in the CNS. Contrary to predictions, we found no association between DKA at diagnosis and neurocognitive performance […] However, even transient effects could be considered potential indicators of CNS vulnerability. Neurophysiological changes at the time of diagnosis have been shown to persist under certain circumstances or for some patients. […] [Some] findings suggest that some individuals may be particularly susceptible to the effects of glycemic extremes on neurocognitive function, consistent with a large body of research in developmental neuroscience indicating individual differences in neurobiological vulnerability to adverse events. Thus, although it is possible that the neurocognitive impairments observed in our study might resolve with euglycemia, deficits at diagnosis could still be considered a potential marker of CNS vulnerability to metabolic perturbations (both acute and chronic).”

“In summary, this study provides the first demonstration that type 1 diabetes–associated neurocognitive impairment can be detected at the time of diagnosis, supporting the possibility that deficits arise secondary to peri-onset effects. Whether these effects are transient markers of vulnerability or represent more persistent changes in CNS awaits further study.”

ii. Association Between Impaired Cardiovascular Autonomic Function and Hypoglycemia in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes.

“Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is a chronic complication of diabetes and an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality (13). The mechanisms of CAN are complex and not fully understood. It can be assessed by simple cardiovascular reflex tests (CARTs) and heart rate variability (HRV) studies that were shown to be sensitive, noninvasive, and reproducible (3,4).”

“HbA1c fails to capture information on the daily fluctuations in blood glucose levels, termed glycemic variability (GV). Recent observations have fostered the notion that GV, independent of HbA1c, may confer an additional risk for the development of micro- and macrovascular diabetes complications (8,9). […] the relationship between GV and chronic complications, specifically CAN, in patients with type 1 diabetes has not been systematically studied. In addition, limited data exist on the relationship between hypoglycemic components of the GV and measures of CAN among subjects with type 1 diabetes (11,12). Therefore, we have designed a prospective study to evaluate the impact and the possible sustained effects of GV on measures of cardiac autonomic function and other cardiovascular complications among subjects with type 1 diabetes […] In the present communication, we report cross-sectional analyses at baseline between indices of hypoglycemic stress on measures of cardiac autonomic function.”

“The following measures of CAN were predefined as outcomes of interests and analyzed: expiration-to-inspiration ratio (E:I), Valsalva ratio, 30:15 ratios, low-frequency (LF) power (0.04 to 0.15 Hz), high-frequency (HF) power (0.15 to 0.4 Hz), and LF/HF at rest and during CARTs. […] We found that LBGI [low blood glucose index] and AUC [area under the curve] hypoglycemia were associated with reduced LF and HF power of HRV [heart rate variability], suggesting an impaired autonomic function, which was independent of glucose control as assessed by the HbA1c.”

“Our findings are in concordance with a recent report demonstrating attenuation of the baroreflex sensitivity and of the sympathetic response to various cardiovascular stressors after antecedent hypoglycemia among healthy subjects who were exposed to acute hypoglycemic stress (18). Similar associations […] were also reported in a small study of subjects with type 2 diabetes (19). […] higher GV and hypoglycemic stress may have an acute effect on modulating autonomic control with inducing a sympathetic/vagal imbalance and a blunting of the cardiac vagal control (18). The impairment in the normal counter-regulatory autonomic responses induced by hypoglycemia on the cardiovascular system could be important in healthy individuals but may be particularly detrimental in individuals with diabetes who have hitherto compromised cardiovascular function and/or subclinical CAN. In these individuals, hypoglycemia may also induce QT interval prolongation, increase plasma catecholamine levels, and lower serum potassium (19,20). In concert, these changes may lower the threshold for serious arrhythmia (19,20) and could result in an increased risk of cardiovascular events and sudden cardiac death. Conversely, the presence of CAN may increase the risk of hypoglycemia through hypoglycemia unawareness and subsequent impaired ability to restore euglycemia (21) through impaired sympathoadrenal response to hypoglycemia or delayed gastric emptying. […] A possible pathogenic role of GV/hypoglycemic stress on CAN development and progressions should be also considered. Prior studies in healthy and diabetic subjects have found that higher exposure to hypoglycemia reduces the counter-regulatory hormone (e.g., epinephrine, glucagon, and adrenocorticotropic hormone) and blunts autonomic nervous system responses to subsequent hypoglycemia (21). […] Our data […] suggest that wide glycemic fluctuations, particularly hypoglycemic stress, may increase the risk of CAN in patients with type 1 diabetes.”

“In summary, in this cohort of relatively young and uncomplicated patients with type 1 diabetes, GV and higher hypoglycemic stress were associated with impaired HRV reflective of sympathetic/parasympathetic dysfunction with potential important clinical consequences.”

iii. Elevated Levels of hs-CRP Are Associated With High Prevalence of Depression in Japanese Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: The Diabetes Distress and Care Registry at Tenri (DDCRT 6).

“In the last decade, several studies have been published that suggest a close association between diabetes and depression. Patients with diabetes have a high prevalence of depression (1) […] and a high prevalence of complications (3). In addition, depression is associated with mortality in these patients (4). […] Because of this strong association, several recent studies have suggested the possibility of a common biological pathway such as inflammation as an underlying mechanism of the association between depression and diabetes (5). […] Multiple mechanisms are involved in the association between diabetes and inflammation, including modulation of lipolysis, alteration of glucose uptake by adipose tissue, and an indirect mechanism involving an increase in free fatty acid levels blocking the insulin signaling pathway (10). Psychological stress can also cause inflammation via innervation of cytokine-producing cells and activation of the sympathetic nervous systems and adrenergic receptors on macrophages (11). Depression enhances the production of inflammatory cytokines (1214). Overproduction of inflammatory cytokines may stimulate corticotropin-releasing hormone production, a mechanism that leads to hypothalamic-pituitary axis activity. Conversely, cytokines induce depressive-like behaviors; in studies where healthy participants were given endotoxin infusions to trigger cytokine release, the participants developed classic depressive symptoms (15). Based on this evidence, it could be hypothesized that inflammation is the common biological pathway underlying the association between diabetes and depression.”

“[F]ew studies have examined the clinical role of inflammation and depression as biological correlates in patients with diabetes. […] In this study, we hypothesized that high CRP [C-reactive protein] levels were associated with the high prevalence of depression in patients with diabetes and that this association may be modified by obesity or glycemic control. […] Patient data were derived from the second-year survey of a diabetes registry at Tenri Hospital, a regional tertiary care teaching hospital in Japan. […] 3,573 patients […] were included in the study. […] Overall, mean age, HbA1c level, and BMI were 66.0 years, 7.4% (57.8 mmol/mol), and 24.6 kg/m2, respectively. Patients with major depression tended to be relatively young […] and female […] with a high BMI […], high HbA1c levels […], and high hs-CRP levels […]; had more diabetic nephropathy […], required more insulin therapy […], and exercised less […]”.

“In conclusion, we observed that hs-CRP levels were associated with a high prevalence of major depression in patients with type 2 diabetes with a BMI of ≥25 kg/m2. […] In patients with a BMI of <25 kg/m2, no significant association was found between hs-CRP quintiles and major depression […] We did not observe a significant association between hs-CRP and major depression in either of HbA1c subgroups. […] Our results show that the association between hs-CRP and diabetes is valid even in an Asian population, but it might not be extended to nonobese subjects. […] several factors such as obesity and glycemic control may modify the association between inflammation and depression. […] Obesity is strongly associated with chronic inflammation.”

iv. A Novel Association Between Nondipping and Painful Diabetic Polyneuropathy.

“Sleep problems are common in painful diabetic polyneuropathy (PDPN) (1) and contribute to the effect of pain on quality of life. Nondipping (the absence of the nocturnal fall in blood pressure [BP]) is a recognized feature of diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) and is attributed to the abnormal prevalence of nocturnal sympathetic activity (2). […] This study aimed to evaluate the relationship of the circadian pattern of BP with both neuropathic pain and pain-related sleep problems in PDPN […] Investigating the relationship between PDPN and BP circadian pattern, we found patients with PDPN exhibited impaired nocturnal decrease in BP compared with those without neuropathy, as well as higher nocturnal systolic BP than both those without DPN and with painless DPN. […] in multivariate analysis including comorbidities and most potential confounders, neuropathic pain was an independent determinant of ∆ in BP and nocturnal systolic BP.”

“PDPN could behave as a marker for the presence and severity of CAN. […] PDPN should increasingly be regarded as a condition of high cardiovascular risk.”

v. Reduced Testing Frequency for Glycated Hemoglobin, HbA1c, Is Associated With Deteriorating Diabetes Control.

I think a potentially important take-away from this paper, which they don’t really talk about, is that when you’re analyzing time series data in research contexts where the HbA1c variable is available at the individual level at some base frequency and you then encounter individuals for whom the HbA1c variable is unobserved in such a data set for some time periods/is not observed at the frequency you’d expect, such (implicit) missing values may not be missing at random (for more on these topics see e.g. this post). More specifically, in light of the findings of this paper I think it would make a lot of sense to default to an assumption of missing values being an indicator of worse-than-average metabolic control during the unobserved period of the time series in question when doing time-to-event analyses, especially in contexts where the values are missing for an extended period of time.

The authors of the paper consider metabolic control an outcome to be explained by the testing frequency. That’s one way to approach these things, but it’s not the only one and I think it’s also important to keep in mind that some patients also sometimes make a conscious decision not to show up for their appointments/tests; i.e. the testing frequency is not necessarily fully determined by the medical staff, although they of course have an important impact on this variable.

Some observations from the paper:

“We examined repeat HbA1c tests (400,497 tests in 79,409 patients, 2008–2011) processed by three U.K. clinical laboratories. We examined the relationship between retest interval and 1) percentage change in HbA1c and 2) proportion of cases showing a significant HbA1c rise. The effect of demographics factors on these findings was also explored. […] Figure 1 shows the relationship between repeat requesting interval (categorized in 1-month intervals) and percentage change in HbA1c concentration in the total data set. From 2 months onward, there was a direct relationship between retesting interval and control. A testing frequency of >6 months was associated with deterioration in control. The optimum testing frequency in order to maximize the downward trajectory in HbA1c between two tests was approximately four times per year. Our data also indicate that testing more frequently than 2 months has no benefit over testing every 2–4 months. Relative to the 2–3 month category, all other categories demonstrated statistically higher mean change in HbA1c (all P < 0.001). […] similar patterns were observed for each of the three centers, with the optimum interval to improvement in overall control at ∼3 months across all centers.”

“[I]n patients with poor control, the pattern was similar to that seen in the total group, except that 1) there was generally a more marked decrease or more modest increase in change of HbA1c concentration throughout and, consequently, 2) a downward trajectory in HbA1c was observed when the interval between tests was up to 8 months, rather than the 6 months as seen in the total group. In patients with a starting HbA1c of <6% (<42 mmol/mol), there was a generally linear relationship between interval and increase in HbA1c, with all intervals demonstrating an upward change in mean HbA1c. The intermediate group showed a similar pattern as those with a starting HbA1c of <6% (<42 mmol/mol), but with a steeper slope.”

“In order to examine the potential link between monitoring frequency and the risk of major deterioration in control, we then assessed the relationship between testing interval and proportion of patients demonstrating an increase in HbA1c beyond the normal biological and analytical variation in HbA1c […] Using this definition of significant increase as a ≥9.9% rise in subsequent HbA1c, our data show that the proportion of patients showing this magnitude of rise increased month to month, with increasing intervals between tests for each of the three centers. […] testing at 2–3-monthly intervals would, at a population level, result in a marked reduction in the proportion of cases demonstrating a significant increase compared with annual testing […] irrespective of the baseline HbA1c, there was a generally linear relationship between interval and the proportion demonstrating a significant increase in HbA1c, though the slope of this relationship increased with rising initial HbA1c.”

“Previous data from our and other groups on requesting patterns indicated that relatively few patients in general practice were tested annually (5,6). […] Our data indicate that for a HbA1c retest interval of more than 2 months, there was a direct relationship between retesting interval and control […], with a retest frequency of greater than 6 months being associated with deterioration in control. The data showed that for diabetic patients as a whole, the optimum repeat testing interval should be four times per year, particularly in those with poorer diabetes control (starting HbA1c >7% [≥53 mmol/mol]). […] The optimum retest interval across the three centers was similar, suggesting that our findings may be unrelated to clinical laboratory factors, local policies/protocols on testing, or patient demographics.”

It might be important to mention that there are important cross-country differences in terms of how often people with diabetes get HbA1c measured – I’m unsure of whether or not standards have changed since then, but at least in Denmark a specific treatment goal of the Danish Regions a few years ago was whether or not 95% of diabetics had had their HbA1c measured within the last year (here’s a relevant link to some stuff I wrote about related topics a while back).

October 2, 2017 Posted by | Cardiology, Diabetes, Immunology, Medicine, Neurology, Psychology, Statistics, Studies | Leave a comment

A few diabetes papers of interest

i. Glycated Hemoglobin and All-Cause and Cause-Specific Mortality in Singaporean Chinese Without Diagnosed Diabetes: The Singapore Chinese Health Study.

“Previous studies have reported that elevated levels of HbA1c below the diabetes threshold (<6.5%) are associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality (312). Yet, this research base is not comprehensive, and data from Chinese populations are scant, especially in those without diabetes. This gap in the literature is important since Southeast Asian populations are experiencing epidemic rates of type 2 diabetes and related comorbidities with a substantial global health impact (1316).

Overall, there are few cohort studies that have examined the etiologic association between HbA1c levels and all-cause and cause-specific mortality. There is even lesser insight on the nature of the relationship between HbA1c and significant clinical outcomes in Southeast Asian populations. Therefore, we examined the association between HbA1c and all-cause and cause-specific mortality in the Singapore Chinese Health Study (SCHS).”

“The design of the SCHS has been previously summarized (17). Briefly, the cohort was drawn from men and women, aged 45–74 years, who belonged to one of the major dialect groups (Hokkien or Cantonese) of Chinese in Singapore. […] Between April 1993 and December 1998, 63,257 individuals completed an in-person interview that included questions on usual diet, demographics, height and weight, use of tobacco, usual physical activity, menstrual and reproductive history (women only), medical history including history of diabetes diagnosis by a physician, and family history of cancer. […] At the follow-up interview (F1), which occurred in 1999–2004, subjects were asked to update their baseline interview information. […] The study population derived from 28,346 participants of the total 54,243 who were alive and participated at F1, who provided consent at F1 to collect subsequent blood samples (a consent rate of ∼65%). The participants for this study were a random selection of individuals from the full study population who did not report a history of diabetes or CVD at the baseline or follow-up interview and reported no history of cancer.”

“During 74,890 person-years of follow-up, there were 888 total deaths, of which 249 were due to CVD, 388 were due to cancer, and 169 were recorded as respiratory mortality. […] There was a positive association between HbA1c and age, BMI, and prevalence of self-reported hypertension, while an inverse association was observed between educational attainment and HbA1c. […] The crude mortality rate was 1,186 deaths per 100,000 person-years. The age- and sex-standardized mortality rates for all-cause, CVD, and cerebrovascular each showed a J-shaped pattern according to HbA1c level. The CHD and cancer mortality rates were higher for HbA1c ≥6.5% (≥48 mmol/mol) and otherwise displayed no apparent pattern. […] There was no association between any level of HbA1c and respiratory causes of death.”

“Chinese men and women with no history of cancer, reported diabetes, or CVD with an HbA1c level ≥6.5% (≥48 mmol/mol) were at a significant increased risk of mortality during follow-up relative to their peers with an HbA1c of 5.4–5.6% (36–38 mmol/mol). No other range of HbA1c was significantly associated with risk of mortality during follow-up, and in secondary analyses, when the HbA1c level ≥6.5% (≥48 mmol/mol) was divided into four categories, this increased risk was observed in all four categories; thus, these data represent a clear threshold association between HbA1c and mortality in this population. These results are consistent with previous prospective cohort studies identifying chronically high HbA1c, outside of diabetes, to be associated with increased risk for all-cause and CVD-related mortality (312,22).”

“Hyperglycemia is a known risk factor for CVD, not limited to individuals with diabetes. This may be in part due to the vascular damage caused by oxidative stress in periods of hypo- and hyperglycemia (23,24). For individuals with impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance, increased oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction are present before the onset of diabetes (25). The association between chronically high levels of HbA1c and development of and death from cancer is not as well defined (9,2630). Abnormal metabolism may play a role in cancer development and death. This is important, considering cancer is the leading cause of death in Singapore for adults 15–59 years of age (31). Increased risk for cancer mortality was found in individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (30). […] Hyperinsulinemia and IGF-I are associated with increased cancer risk, possibly through mitogenic effects and tumor formation (27,28,37). This is the basis for the insulin-cancer hypothesis. Simply put, chronic levels of hyperinsulinemia reduce the production of IGF binding proteins 1 and 2. The absence of these proteins results in excess bioactive IGF-I, supporting tumor development (38). Chronic hyperglycemia, indicating high levels of insulin and IGF-I, may explain inhibition of cell apoptosis, increased cell proliferation, and increased cancer risk (39).”

ii. The Cross-sectional and Longitudinal Associations of Diabetic Retinopathy With Cognitive Function and Brain MRI Findings: The Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) Trial.

“Brain imaging studies suggest that type 2 diabetes–related microvascular disease may affect the central nervous system in addition to its effects on other organs, such as the eye and kidney. Histopathological evidence indicates that microvascular disease in the brain can lead to white matter lesions (WMLs) visible with MRI of the brain (1), and risk for them is often increased by type 2 diabetes (26). Type 2 diabetes also has recently been associated with lower brain volume, particularly gray matter volume (79).

The association between diabetic retinopathy and changes in brain tissue is of particular interest because retinal and cerebral small vessels have similar anatomy, physiology, and embryology (10). […] the preponderance of evidence suggests diabetic retinopathy is associated with increased WML burden (3,1214), although variation exists. While cross-sectional studies support a correlation between diabetic retinopathy and WMLs (2,3,6,15), diabetic retinopathy and brain atrophy (16), diabetic retinopathy and psychomotor speed (17,18), and psychomotor speed and WMLs (5,19,20), longitudinal evidence demonstrating the assumed sequence of disease development, for example, vascular damage of eye and brain followed by cognitive decline, is lacking.

Using Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) data, in which a subset of participants received longitudinal measurements of diabetic retinopathy, cognition, and MRI variables, we analyzed the 1) cross-sectional associations between diabetic retinopathy and evidence of brain microvascular disease and 2) determined whether baseline presence or severity of diabetic retinopathy predicts 20- or 40-month changes in cognitive performance or brain microvascular disease.”

“The ACCORD trial (21) was a multicenter randomized trial examining the effects of intensive glycemic control, blood pressure, and lipids on cardiovascular disease events. The 10,251 ACCORD participants were aged 40–79 years, had poorly controlled type 2 diabetes (HbA1c > 7.5% [58.5 mmol/mol]), and had or were at high risk for cardiovascular disease. […] The ACCORD-Eye sample comprised 3,472 participants who did not report previous vitrectomy or photocoagulation surgery for proliferative diabetic retinopathy at baseline […] ACCORD-MIND included a subset of 2,977 ACCORD participants who completed a 30-min cognitive testing battery, 614 of whom also had useable scans from the MRI substudy (23,24). […] ACCORD-MIND had visits at three time points: baseline, 20 months, and 40 months. MRI of the brain was completed at baseline and the 40-month time point.”

“Baseline diabetic retinopathy was associated with more rapid 40-month declines in DSST and MMSE [Mini-Mental State Examination] when adjusting for demographics and lifestyle factors in model 1 […]. Moreover, increasing severity of diabetic retinopathy was associated with increased amounts of decline in DSST [Digit Symbol Substitution Test] performance (−1.30, −1.76, and −2.81 for no, mild, and moderate/severe NPDR, respectively; P = 0.003) […Be careful about how to interpret that p-value – see below, US] . The associations remained virtually unchanged after further adjusting for vascular and diabetes risk factors, depression, and visual acuity using model 2.”

“This longitudinal study provides new evidence that diabetic retinopathy is associated with future cognitive decline in persons with type 2 diabetes and confirms the finding from the Edinburgh Type 2 Diabetes Study derived from cross-sectional data that lifetime cognitive decline is associated with diabetic retinopathy (32). We found that the presence of diabetic retinopathy, independent of visual acuity, predicts greater declines in global cognitive function measured with the MMSE and that the magnitude of decline in processing speed measured with the DSST increased with increasing severity of baseline diabetic retinopathy. The association with psychomotor speed is consistent with prior cross-sectional findings in community-based samples of middle-aged (18) and older adults (17), as well as prospective studies of a community-based sample of middle-aged adults (33) and patients with type 1 diabetes (34) showing that retinopathy with different etiologies predicted a subsequent decline in psychomotor speed. This study extends these findings to patients with type 2 diabetes.”

“we tested a number of different associations but did not correct P values for multiple testing” [Aargh!, US.]

iii. Incidence of Remission in Adults With Type 2 Diabetes: The Diabetes & Aging Study.

(Note to self before moving on to the paper: these people identified type 1 diabetes by self-report or diabetes onset at <30 years of age, treated with insulin only and never treated with oral agents).

“It is widely believed that type 2 diabetes is a chronic progressive condition, which at best can be controlled, but never cured (1), and that once treatment with glucose-lowering medication is initiated, it is required indefinitely and is intensified over time (2,3). However, a growing body of evidence from clinical trials and case-control studies (46) has reported the remission of type 2 diabetes in certain populations, most notably individuals who received bariatric surgery. […] Despite the clinical relevance and importance of remission, little is known about the incidence of remission in community settings (11,12). Studies to date have focused largely on remission after gastric bypass or relied on data from clinical trials, which have limited generalizability. Therefore, we conducted a retrospective cohort study to describe the incidence rates and variables associated with remission among adults with type 2 diabetes who received usual care, excluding bariatric surgery, in a large, ethnically diverse population. […] 122,781 individuals met our study criteria, yielding 709,005 person-years of total follow-up time.”

“Our definitions of remission were based on the 2009 ADA consensus statement (10). “Partial remission” of diabetes was defined as having two or more consecutive subdiabetic HbA1c measurements, all of which were in the range of 5.7–6.4% [39–46 mmol/mol] over a period of at least 12 months. “Complete remission” was defined as having two or more consecutive normoglycemic HbA1c measurements, all of which were <5.7% [<39 mmol/mol] over a period of at least 12 months. “Prolonged remission” was defined as having two or more consecutive normoglycemic HbA1c measurements, all of which were <5.7% [<39 mmol/mol] over a period of at least 60 months. Each definition of remission requires the absence of pharmacologic treatment during the defined observation period.”

“The average age of participants was 62 years, 47.1% were female, and 51.6% were nonwhite […]. The mean (SD) interval between HbA1c tests in the remission group was 256 days (139 days). The mean interval (SD) between HbA1c tests among patients not in the remission group was 212 days (118 days). The median time since the diagnosis of diabetes in our cohort was 5.9 years, and the average baseline HbA1c level was 7.4% [57 mmol/mol]. The 18,684 individuals (15.2%) in the subset with new-onset diabetes, defined as ≤2 years since diagnosis, were younger, were more likely to have their diabetes controlled by diet, and had fewer comorbidities […] The incidence densities of partial, complete, and prolonged remission in the full cohort were 2.8 (95% CI 2.6–2.9), 0.24 (95% CI 0.20–0.28), and 0.04 (95% CI 0.01–0.06) cases per 1,000 person-years, respectively […] The 7-year cumulative incidences of partial, complete, and prolonged remission were 1.5% (95% CI 1.4–1.5%), 0.14% (95% CI 0.12–0.16%), and 0.01% (95% CI 0.003–0.02%), respectively. The 7-year cumulative incidence of any remission decreased with longer time since diagnosis from a high of 4.6% (95% CI 4.3–4.9%) for individuals diagnosed with diabetes in the past 2 years to a low of 0.4% (95% CI 0.3–0.5%) in those diagnosed >10 years ago. The 7-year cumulative incidence of any remission was much lower for individuals using insulin (0.05%; 95% CI 0.03–0.1%) or oral agents (0.3%; 95% CI 0.2–0.3%) at baseline compared with diabetes patients not using medication at baseline (12%; 95% CI 12–13%).”

“In this large cohort of insured adults with type 2 diabetes not treated with bariatric surgery, we found that 1.5% of individuals with recent evidence of clinical diabetes achieved at least partial remission over a 7-year period. If these results were generalized to the 25.6 million U.S. adults living with type 2 diabetes in 2010 (25), they would suggest that 384,000 adults could experience remission over the next 7 years. However, the rate of prolonged remission was extremely rare (0.007%), translating into only 1,800 adults in the U.S. experiencing remission lasting at least 5 years. To provide context, 1.7% of the cohort died, while only 0.8% experienced any level of remission, during the calendar year 2006. Thus, the chances of dying were higher than the chances of any remission. […] Although remission of type 2 diabetes is uncommon, it does occur in patients who have not undergone surgical interventions. […] Our analysis shows that remission is rare and variable. The likelihood of remission is more common among individuals with early-onset diabetes and those not treated with glucose-lowering medications at the point of diabetes diagnosis. Although rare, remission can also occur in individuals with more severe diabetes and those previously treated with insulin.”

iv. Blood pressure control for diabetic retinopathy (Cochrane review).

“Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of diabetes and a leading cause of visual impairment and blindness. Research has established the importance of blood glucose control to prevent development and progression of the ocular complications of diabetes. Simultaneous blood pressure control has been advocated for the same purpose, but findings reported from individual studies have supported varying conclusions regarding the ocular benefit of interventions on blood pressure. […] The primary aim of this review was to summarize the existing evidence regarding the effect of interventions to control or reduce blood pressure levels among diabetics on incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy, preservation of visual acuity, adverse events, quality of life, and costs. A secondary aim was to compare classes of anti-hypertensive medications with respect to the same outcomes.”

“We included 15 RCTs, conducted primarily in North America and Europe, that had enrolled 4157 type 1 and 9512 type 2 diabetic participants, ranging from 16 to 2130 participants in individual trials. […] Study designs, populations, interventions, and lengths of follow-up (range one to nine years) varied among the included trials. Overall, the quality of the evidence for individual outcomes was low to moderate.”

“The evidence from these trials supported a benefit of more intensive blood pressure control intervention with respect to 4- to 5-year incidence of diabetic retinopathy (estimated risk ratio (RR) 0.80; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.71 to 0.92) and the combined outcome of incidence and progression (estimated RR 0.78; 95% CI 0.63 to 0.97). The available evidence provided less support for a benefit with respect to 4- to 5-year progression of diabetic retinopathy (point estimate was closer to 1 than point estimates for incidence and combined incidence and progression, and the CI overlapped 1; estimated RR 0.88; 95% CI 0.73 to 1.05). The available evidence regarding progression to proliferative diabetic retinopathy or clinically significant macular edema or moderate to severe loss of best-corrected visual acuity did not support a benefit of intervention on blood pressure: estimated RRs and 95% CIs 0.95 (0.83 to 1.09) and 1.06 (0.85 to 1.33), respectively, after 4 to 5 years of follow-up. Findings within subgroups of trial participants (type 1 and type 2 diabetics; participants with normal blood pressure levels at baseline and those with elevated levels) were similar to overall findings.”

“The available evidence supports a beneficial effect of intervention to reduce blood pressure with respect to preventing diabetic retinopathy for up to 4 to 5 years. However, the lack of evidence to support such intervention to slow progression of diabetic retinopathy or to prevent other outcomes considered in this review, along with the relatively modest support for the beneficial effect on incidence, weakens the conclusion regarding an overall benefit of intervening on blood pressure solely to prevent diabetic retinopathy.”

v. Early Atherosclerosis Relates to Urinary Albumin Excretion and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes: Adolescent Type 1 Diabetes cardio-renal Intervention Trial (AdDIT).

“Children with type 1 diabetes are at greatly increased risk for the development of both renal and cardiovascular disease in later life (1,2). Evidence is accumulating that these two complications may have a common pathophysiology, with endothelial dysfunction a key early event.

Microalbuminuria is a recognized marker of endothelial damage (3) and predicts progression to proteinuria and diabetic nephropathy, as well as to atherosclerosis (4) and increased cardiovascular risk (5). It is, however, rare in adolescents with type 1 diabetes who more often have higher urinary albumin excretion rates within the normal range, which are associated with later progression to microalbuminuria and proteinuria (6).”

“The Adolescent Type 1 Diabetes cardio-renal Intervention Trial (AdDIT) (10) is designed to examine the impact of minor differences in albumin excretion in adolescents on the initiation and progression of cardiovascular and renal disease. The primary cardiovascular end point in AdDIT is carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT). Subclinical atherosclerosis can be detected noninvasively using high-resolution ultrasound to measure the intima-media thickness (IMT) of the carotid arteries, which predicts cardiovascular morbidity and mortality (11,12). […] The primary aim of this study was to examine the relationship of increased urinary albumin excretion and cardiovascular risk factors in adolescents with type 1 diabetes with structural arterial wall changes. We hypothesized that even minor increases in albumin excretion would be associated with early atherosclerosis but that this would be detectable only in the abdominal aorta. […] A total of 406 adolescents, aged 10–16 years, with type 1 diabetes for more than 1 year, recruited in five centers across Australia, were enrolled in this cross-sectional study”.

“Structural changes in the aorta and carotid arteries could be detected in >50% of adolescents with type 1 diabetes […] The difference in aIMT [aortic intima-media thickness] between type 1 diabetic patients and age- and sex-matched control subjects was equivalent to that seen with a 5- to 6-year age increase in the type 1 diabetic patients. […] Aortic IMT was […] able to better differentiate adolescents with type 1 diabetes from control subjects than was carotid wall changes. Aortic IMT enabled detection of the very early wall changes that are present with even small differences in urinary albumin excretion. This not only supports the concept of early intervention but provides a link between renal and cardiovascular disease.

The independent relationship between aIMT and urinary albumin excretion extends our knowledge of the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and renal disease in type 1 diabetes by showing that the first signs of the development of cardiovascular disease and diabetic nephropathy are related. The concept that microalbuminuria is a marker of a generalized endothelial damage, as well as a marker of renal disease, has been recognized for >20 years (3,20,21). Endothelial dysfunction is the first critical step in the development of atherosclerosis (22). Early rises in urinary albumin excretion precede the development of microalbuminuria and proteinuria (23). It follows that the first structural changes of atherosclerosis could relate to the first biochemical changes of diabetic nephropathy. To our knowledge, this is the first study to provide evidence of this.”

“In conclusion, atherosclerosis is detectable from early adolescence in type 1 diabetes. Its early independent associations are male sex, age, systolic blood pressure, LDL cholesterol, and, importantly, urinary albumin excretion. […] Early rises in urinary albumin excretion during adolescence not only are important for determining risk of progression to microalbuminuria and diabetic nephropathy but also may alert the clinician to increased risk of cardiovascular disease.”

vi. Impact of Islet Autoimmunity on the Progressive β-Cell Functional Decline in Type 2 Diabetes.

“Historically, type 2 diabetes (T2D) has not been considered to be immune mediated. However, many notable discoveries in recent years have provided evidence to support the concept of immune system involvement in T2D pathophysiology (15). Immune cells have been identified in the pancreases of phenotypic T2D patients (35). Moreover, treatment with interleukin-1 receptor agonist improves β-cell function in T2D patients (68). These studies suggest that β-cell damage/destruction mediated by the immune system may be a component of T2D pathophysiology.

Although the β-cell damage and destruction in autoimmune diabetes is most likely T-cell mediated (T), immune markers of autoimmune diabetes have primarily centered on the presence of circulating autoantibodies (Abs) to various islet antigens (915). Abs commonly positive in type 1 diabetes (T1D), especially GAD antibody (GADA) and islet cell Abs (ICA), have been shown to be more common in patients with T2D than in nondiabetic control populations, and the presence of multiple islet Abs, such as GADA, ICA, and tyrosine phosphatase-2 (insulinoma-associated protein 2 [IA-2]), have been demonstrated to be associated with an earlier need for insulin treatment in adult T2D patients (14,1620).”

“In this study, we observed development of islet autoimmunity, measured by islet Abs and islet-specific T-cell responses, in 61% of the phenotypic T2D patients. We also observed a significant association between positive islet-reactive T-cell responses and a more rapid decline in β-cell function as assessed by FCP and glucagon-SCP responses. […] The results of this pilot study led us to hypothesize that islet autoimmunity is present or will develop in a large portion of phenotypic T2D patients and that the development of islet autoimmunity is associated with a more rapid decline in β-cell function. Moreover, the prevalence of islet autoimmunity in most previous studies is grossly underestimated because these studies have not tested for islet-reactive T cells in T2D patients but have based the presence of autoimmunity on antibody testing alone […] The results of this pilot study suggest important changes to our understanding of T2D pathogenesis by demonstrating that the prevalence of islet autoimmune development is not only more prevalent in T2D patients than previously estimated but may also play an important role in β-cell dysfunction in the T2D disease process.”

September 18, 2017 Posted by | Cancer/oncology, Cardiology, Diabetes, Epidemiology, Immunology, Medicine, Nephrology, Neurology, Ophthalmology, Studies | Leave a comment

Gastrointestinal Function in Diabetes (II)

Some more observations from the book below.

“In comparison with other parts of the gastrointestinal tract, the human oesophagus is a relatively simple organ with relatively simple functions. Despite this simplicity, disordered oesophageal function is not uncommon. […] The human oesophagus is a muscular tube that connects the pharyngeal cavity to the stomach. […] The most important functions of the human oesophagus and its sphincters are to propel swallowed food boluses to the stomach and to prevent gastro-oesophageal and oesophagopharyngeal reflux. […] Whereas the passage of liquid and solid food boluses through the oesophagus, and even acid gastrooesophageal reflux, are usually not perceived, the likelihood of perception is greater under pathological circumstances […] However, the relationship between oesophageal perception and stimulation is highly variable, e.g. patients with severe oesophagitis may deny any oesophageal symptom, while others with an endoscopically normal oesophagus may suffer from severe reflux symptoms.”

“While it is clear that oesophageal dysfunction occurs frequently in diabetes mellitus, there is considerable variation in the reported prevalence between different studies. […] Numerous studies have shown that oesophageal transit, as measured with radionuclide techniques, is slower in patients with diabetes than in age- and sex-matched healthy controls […] oesophageal transit appears to be delayed in 40–60% of patients with long-standing diabetes […] Although information relating to the prevalence of manometric abnormalities of the oesophagus [relevant link] is limited, the available data indicate that these are evident in approximately 50% of patients with diabetes […] A variety of oesophageal motor abnormalities has been demonstrated in patients with diabetes mellitus […]. These include a decreased amplitude […] and number […] of peristaltic contractions […], and an increased incidence of simultaneous […] and nonpropagated [10] contractions, as well as abnormal wave forms [17,30,32]. […] there is unequivocal evidence of damage to the extrinsic nerve supply to the oesophagus in diabetes mellitus. The results of examination of the oesophagus in 20 patients who died from diabetes disclosed histologic abnormalities in 18 of them […] The available information indicates that the prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is higher in diabetes. Murray and co-workers studied 20 diabetic patients (14 type 1, six type 2), of whom nine (45%) were found to have excessive gastro-oesophageal acid reflux […] In a larger study of 50 type 1 diabetic patients without symptoms or history of gastro-oesophageal disease, abnormal gastro-oesophageal reflux, defined as a percentage of time with esophageal pH < 4 exceeding 3.5%, was detected in 14 patients (28%) [37].”

“Several studies have shown that the gastrointestinal motor responses to various stimuli are impaired during acute hyperglycaemia in both healthy subjects and diabetic patients […] acute hyperglycaemia reduces LOS [lower oesophageal sphincter, US] pressure and impairs oesophageal motility […] Several studies have shown that abnormal oesophageal motility is more frequent in diabetic patients who have evidence of peripheral or autonomic neuropathy than in those without […] In one of the largest studies that focused on the relationship between neuropathy and disordered oesophageal function, 50 […] insulin-requiring diabetics were stratified into three groups: (a) patients without peripheral neuropathy (n = 18); (b) patients with peripheral neuropathy but no autonomic neuropathy (n = 20); and (c) patients with both peripheral and autonomic neuropathy (n = 12). Radionuclide oesophageal emptying was found to be abnormal in 55%, 70% and 83% of patients in groups A, B and C, respectively [17]. […] It must be emphasised, however, that although several studies have provided evidence for the existence of a relationship between disordered oesophageal function and diabetic autonomic neuropathy, this relationship is relatively weak [13,14,17,27,37,49].”

“There is considerable disagreement in the literature as to the prevalence of symptoms of oesophageal dysfunction in diabetes mellitus. Some publications indicate that patients with diabetes mellitus usually do not complain about oesophageal symptoms, even when severe oesophageal dysfunction is present. […] However, in other studies a high prevalence of oesophageal symptoms in diabetics has been documented. For example, 27% of 137 unselected diabetics attending an outpatient clinic admitted to having dysphagia when specifically asked […] The poor association between oesophageal dysfunction and symptoms in patients with diabetes may reflect impaired perception of oesophageal stimuli caused by neuropathic abnormalities in afferent pathways. The development of symptoms and signs of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in diabetics may in part be counteracted by a decrease in gastric acid secretion [59]. […] [However] oesophageal acid exposure is increased in about 40% of diabetics and it is known that the absence of reflux symptoms does not exclude the presence of severe oesophagitis and/or Barrett’s metaplasia. Due to impaired oesophageal perception, the proportion of asymptomatic patients with reflux disease may be higher in the presence of diabetes than when diabetes is absent. It might, therefore, be argued that a screening upper gastrointestinal endoscopy should be performed in diabetic patients, even when no oesophageal or gastric symptoms are reported. However, [a] more cost-effective
and realistic approach may be to perform endoscopy in diabetics with other risk factors for reflux disease, in particular severe obesity.
[…] Since upper gastrointestinal symptoms correlate poorly with objective abnormalities of gastrointestinal motor function in diabetes, the symptomatic benefit that could be expected from correction of these motor abnormalities is questionable. […] Little or nothing is known about the prognosis of disordered oesophageal function in diabetes. Long-term follow-up studies are lacking.

“Abnormally delayed gastric emptying, or gastroparesis, was once considered to be a rare sequela of diabetes mellitus, occurring occasionally in patients who had long-standing diabetes complicated by symptomatic autonomic neuropathy, and inevitably associated with both intractable upper gastrointestinal symptoms and a poor prognosis [1]. Consequent upon the development of a number of techniques to quantify gastric motility […] and the rapid expansion of knowledge relating to both normal and disordered gastric motor function in humans over the last ∼ 20 years, it is now recognised that these concepts are incorrect. […] Delayed gastric emptying represents a frequent, and clinically important, complication of diabetes mellitus. […] Cross-sectional studies […] have established that gastric emptying of solid, or nutrient liquid, meals is abnormally slow in some 30–50% of outpatients with longstanding type 1 [7–20] or type 2 [20–26] diabetes […]. Early studies, using insensitive barium contrast techniques to quantify gastric emptying, clearly underestimated the prevalence substantially [1,27]. The reported prevalence of delayed gastric emptying is highest when gastric emptying of both solid and nutrient-containing liquids (or semi-solids) are measured, either simultaneously or on separate occasions [17,28,29], as there is a relatively poor correlation between gastric emptying of solids and liquids in diabetes [28–30]. […] It is now recognised that delayed gastric emptying also occurs frequently (perhaps about 30%) in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes [37–39]. […] intragastric meal distribution is also frequently abnormal in outpatients with diabetes, with increased retention of food in both the proximal and distal stomach [31,33]. The former may potentially be important in the aetiology of gastro-oesophageal reflux [34], which appears to occur more frequently in patients with diabetes […] Diabetic gastroparesis is often associated with motor dysfunction in other areas of the gut, e.g. oesophageal transit is delayed in some 50% of patients with long-standing diabetes [8].”

“Overall patterns of gastric emptying are critically dependent on the physical and chemical composition of a meal, so that there are substantial differences between solids, semi-solids, nutrient liquids and non-nutrient liquids [70]. […] The major factor regulating gastric emptying of nutrients (liquids and ‘liquefied’ solids) is feedback inhibition, triggered by receptors that are distributed throughout the small intestine [72]; as a result of this inhibition, nutrient-containing liquids usually empty from the stomach at an overall rate of about 2 kcal/min, after an initial emptying phase that may be somewhat faster [73]. These small intestinal receptors also respond to pH, osmolality and distension, as well as nutrient content. […] While the differential emptying rates of solids, nutrient and non-nutrient liquids when ingested alone is well established, there is much less information about the interaction between different meal components. When liquids and solids are consumed together, liquids empty preferentially (∼ 80% before the solid starts to empty) […] and the presence of a solid meal results in an overall slowing of a simultaneously ingested liquid [71,75,76]. Therefore, while it is clear that the stomach can, to some extent, regulate the emptying of liquids and solids separately, the mechanisms by which this is accomplished remain poorly defined. Extracellular fat has a much lower density than water and is liquid at body temperature. The pattern of gastric emptying of fat, and its effects on emptying of other meal components are, therefore, dependent on posture — in the left lateral posture oil accumulates in the stomach and empties early, which markedly delays emptying of a nutrient liquid [77]. Gastric emptying is also influenced by patterns of previous nutrient intake. In healthy young and older subjects, supplementation of the diet with glucose is associated with acceleration of gastric emptying of glucose [78,79], while short-term starvation slows gastric emptying”.

“[I]n animal models of diabetes a number of morphological changes are evident in the autonomic nerves supplying the gut and the myenteric plexus, including a reduction in the number of myelinated axons in the vagosympathetic trunk and neurons in the dorsal root ganglia, abnormalities in neurotransmitters […] as well as a reduced number of interstitial cells of Cajal in the fundus and antrum [89–92]. In contrast, there is hitherto little evidence of a fixed pathological process in the neural tissue of humans with diabetes […] While a clear-cut association between disordered gastrointestinal function in diabetes mellitus and the presence of autonomic neuropathy remains to be established, it is now recognised that acute changes in the blood glucose concentration have a substantial, and reversible, effect on gastric (as well as oesophageal, intestinal, gallbladder and anorectal) motility, in both healthy subjects and patients with diabetes […] Marked hyperglycaemia (blood glucose concentration ∼ 15 mmol/l) affects motility in every region of the gastrointestinal tract [103]. […] In healthy subjects [114] and patients with uncomplicated type 1 diabetes […] gastric emptying is accelerated markedly during hypoglycaemia […] this response is likely to be important in the counterregulation of hypoglycaemia. It is not known whether the magnitude of the effect of hypoglycaemia on gastric emptying is influenced by gastroparesis and/or autonomic neuropathy. Recent studies have established that changes in the blood glucose concentration within the normal postprandial range also influence gastric emptying and motility [104–106]; emptying of solids and nutrient-containing liquids is slower at a blood glucose of 8 mmol/l than at 4 mmol/l in both healthy subjects and patients with type 1 diabetes […] Recent studies suggest that the rate of gastric emptying is a significant factor in postprandial hypotension. The latter, which may lead to syncope and falls, is an important clinical problem, particularly in the elderly and patients with autonomic dysfunction (usually diabetes mellitus), occurring more frequently than orthostatic hypotension [154].”

“Gastric emptying is potentially an important determinant of oral drug absorption; most orally administered drugs (including alcohol) are absorbed more slowly from the stomach than from the small intestine because the latter has a much greater surface area [179,180]. Thus, delayed gastric emptying (particularly that of tablets or capsules, which are not degraded easily in the stomach) and a reduction in antral phase 3 activity, may potentially lead to fluctuations in the serum concentrations of orally administered drugs. This may be particularly important when a rapid onset of drug effect is desirable, as with some oral hypoglycaemic drugs […]. There is relatively little information about drug absorption in patients with diabetic gastroparesis [179] and additional studies are required.”

“Glycated haemoglobin is influenced by both fasting and postprandial glucose levels; while their relative contributions have not been defined precisely [181], it is clear that improved overall glycaemic control, as assessed by glycated haemoglobin, can be achieved by lowering postprandial blood glucose concentrations, even at the expense of higher fasting glucose levels [182]. Accordingly, the control of postprandial blood glucose levels, as opposed to glycated haemoglobin, now represents a specific target for treatment […] It remains to be established whether postprandial glycaemia per se, including the magnitude of postprandial hyperglycaemic spikes, has a distinct role in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications, but there is increasing data to support this concept [181,183,184]. It is also possible that the extent of blood glucose fluctuations is an independent determinant of the risk for long-term diabetic complications [184]. […] postprandial blood glucose levels are potentially determined by a number of factors, including preprandial glucose concentrations, the glucose content of a meal, small intestinal delivery and absorption of nutrients, insulin secretion, hepatic glucose metabolism and peripheral insulin sensitivity. Although the relative contribution of these factors remains controversial, and is likely to vary with time after a meal, it is now recognised that gastric emptying accounts for at least 35% of the variance in peak glucose levels after oral glucose (75 g) in both healthy individuals and patients with type 2 diabetes […] It is also clear that even modest perturbations in gastric emptying of carbohydrate have a major effect on postprandial glycaemia [76,79]. […] it appears that much of the observed variation in the glycaemic response to different food types (‘glycaemic indices’) in both normal subjects and patients with diabetes is attributable to differences in rates of gastric emptying [103]. […] In type 1 patients with gastroparesis […] less insulin is initially required to maintain euglycaemia after a meal when compared to those with normal gastric emptying [187]. […] There are numerous uncontrolled reports supporting the concept […] that in type 1 patients gastroparesis is a risk factor for poor glycaemic control.”

“The potential for the modulation of gastric emptying, by dietary or pharmacological means, to minimise postprandial glucose excursions and optimise glycaemic control, represents a novel approach to the optimisation of glycaemic control in diabetes, which is now being explored actively. It is important to appreciate that the underlying strategies are likely to differ fundamentally between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, interventions that improve the coordination between nutrient absorption and the action of exogenous insulin are likely to be beneficial, even in those patients who have delayed gastric emptying, i.e. by accelerating or even slowing gastric emptying, so that the rate of nutrient delivery (and hence absorption) is more predictable. In contrast, in type 2 diabetes, it may be anticipated that slowing of the absorption of nutrients would be desirable […] In the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, dietary modifications potentially represent a more attractive and cost-effective approach than drugs […] A number of dietary strategies may slow carbohydrate absorption […] an increase in dietary fibre […] Fat is a potent inhibitor of gastric emptying and […] these effects may be dependent on posture [77]; there is the potential for relatively small quantities of fat given immediately before consumption of, or with, a meal to slow gastric emptying of other meal components, so that the postprandial rise in blood glucose is minimised [210] (this is analogous to the slowing of alcohol absorption and liquid gastric emptying when alcohol is ingested after a solid meal, rather than in the fasted state [75]). […] there is evidence that the suppression of subsequent food intake by the addition of fat to a meal may exceed the caloric value of the fat load [212]. In the broadest sense, the glycaemic response to a meal is also likely to be critically dependent on whether food from the previous meal is still present in the stomach and/or small intestine at the time of its ingestion, so that glucose tolerance may be expected to be worse in the fasted state […] than after a meal.”

“At present it is not known whether normalisation of gastric emptying in either type 1 or type 2 patients with gastroparesis improves glycaemic control. […] prokinetic drugs would not be expected to have a beneficial effect on glycaemic control in type 2 patients who are not using insulin. Erythromycin may, however, as a result of its interaction with motilin receptors, also stimulate insulin secretion (and potentially improve glycaemic control by this mechanism) in type 2 diabetes [220] […] It should […] be recognised that any drug that slows gastric emptying has the potential to induce or exacerbate upper gastrointestinal symptoms, delay oral drug absorbtion and impair the counter-regulation of glycaemia. […] At present, the use of prokinetic drugs (mainly cisapride, domperidone, metoclopramide and erythromycin) forms the mainstay of therapy [167,244–259], and most patients will require drug treatment. In general, these drugs all result in dose-related improvements in gastric emptying after acute administration […] The response to prokinetic therapy (magnitude of acceleration in gastric emptying) tends to be greater when gastric emptying is more delayed. It should be recognised that relatively few controlled studies have evaluated the effects of ‘prolonged’ (> 8 weeks) prokinetic therapy, that in many studies the sample sizes have been small, and that the assessments of gastrointestinal symptoms have, not infrequently, been suboptimal; furthermore, the results of some of these studies have been negative [32]. There have hitherto been relatively few randomised controlled trials of high quality, and those that are available differ substantially in design. […] In general, there is a poor correlation between effects on symptoms and gastric emptying — prokinetic drugs may improve symptoms by effects unrelated to acceleration of gastric emptying or central anti-emetic properties [254].”

“Autoimmune factors are well recognised to play a role in the aetiology of type 1 diabetes [316,317]. In such patients there is an increased prevalence of autoimmune aggression against non-endocrine tissues, including the gastric mucosa. The reported prevalence of parietal cell antibodies in patients with type 1 diabetes is in the range 5–28%, compared to 1.4–12% in non-diabetic controls […] The autoimmune response to parietal cell antibodies may lead to atrophic gastritis, pernicious anaemia and iron deficiency anaemia […] Parietal cell antibodies can inhibit the secretion of intrinsic factor, which is necessary for the absorption of vitamin B12, potentially resulting in pernicious anaemia. The prevalence of latent and overt pernicious anaemia in type 1 diabetes has been reported to be 1.6–4% and 0.4%, respectively […] screening for parietal cell antibodies in patients with type 1 diabetes currently appears inappropriate. However, there should be a low threshold for further investigation in those patients presenting with anaemia”.

September 1, 2017 Posted by | Books, Diabetes, Gastroenterology, Immunology, Medicine, Neurology | Leave a comment

Utility of Research Autopsies for Understanding the Dynamics of Cancer

A few links:
Pancreatic cancer.
Jaccard index.
Limited heterogeneity of known driver gene mutations among the metastases of individual patients with pancreatic cancer.
Epitope.
Tissue-specific mutation accumulation in human adult stem cells during life.
Epigenomic reprogramming during pancreatic cancer progression links anabolic glucose metabolism to distant metastasis.

August 25, 2017 Posted by | Cancer/oncology, Genetics, Immunology, Lectures, Medicine, Statistics | Leave a comment

Infectious Disease Surveillance (III)

I have added some more observations from the book below.

“Zoonotic diseases are infections transmitted between animals and humans […]. A recent survey identified more than 1,400 species of human disease–causing agents, over half (58%) of which were zoonotic [2]. Moreover, nearly three-quarters (73%) of infectious diseases considered to be emerging or reemerging were zoonotic [2]. […] In many countries there is minimal surveillance for live animal imports or imported wildlife products. Minimal surveillance prevents the identification of wildlife trade–related health risks to the public, agricultural industry, and native wildlife [36] and has led to outbreaks of zoonotic diseases […] Southeast Asia [is] a hotspot for emerging zoonotic diseases because of rapid population growth, high population density, and high biodiversity […] influenza virus in particular is of zoonotic importance as multiple human infections have resulted from animal exposure [77–79].”

“[R]abies is an important cause of death in many countries, particularly in Africa and Asia [85]. Rabies is still underreported throughout the developing world, and 100-fold underreporting of human rabies is estimated for most of Africa [44]. Reasons for underreporting include lack of public health personnel, difficulties in identifying suspect animals, and limited laboratory capacity for rabies testing. […] Brucellosis […] is transmissible to humans primarily through consumption of unpasteurized milk or dairy products […] Brucella is classified as a category B bioterrorism agent [90] because of its potential for aerosolization [I should perhaps here mention that the book coverage does overlaps a bit with that of Fong & Alibek’s book – which I covered here – but that I decided against covering those topics in much detail here – US] […] The key to preventing brucellosis in humans is to control or eliminate infections in animals [91–93]; therefore, veterinarians are crucial to the identification, prevention, and control of brucellosis [89]. […] Since 1954 [there has been] an ongoing eradication program involving surveillance testing of cattle at slaughter, testing at livestock markets, and whole-herd testing on the farm [in the US] […] Except for endemic brucellosis in wildlife in the Greater Yellowstone Area, all 50 states and territories in the United States are free of bovine brucellosis [94].”

“Because of its high mortality rate in humans in the absence of early treatment, Y. pestis is viewed as one of the most pathogenic human bacteria [101]. In the United States, plague is most often found in the Southwest where it is transmitted by fleas and maintained in rodent populations [102]. Deer mice and voles typically serve as maintenance hosts [and] these animals are often resistant to plague [102]. In contrast, in amplifying host species such as prairie dogs, ground squirrels, chipmunks, and wood rats, plague spreads rapidly and results in high mortality [103]. […] Human infections with Y. pestis can result in bubonic, pneumonic, or septicemic plague, depending on the route of exposure. Bubonic plague is most common; however, pneumonic plague poses a more serious public health risk since it can be easily transmitted person-to-person through inhalation of aerosolized bacteria […] Septicemic plague is characterized by bloodstream infection with Y. pestis and can occur secondary to pneumonic or bubonic forms of infection or as a primary infection [6,60].
Plague outbreaks are often correlated with animal die-offs in the area [104], and rodent control near human residences is important to prevent disease [103]. […] household pets can be an important route of plague transmission and flea control in dogs and cats is an important prevention measure [105]. Plague surveillance involves monitoring three populations for infection: vectors (e.g., fleas), humans, and rodents [106]. In the past 20 years, the numbers of human cases of plague reported in the United States have varied from 1 to 17 cases per year [90]. […]
Since rodent species are the main reservoirs of the bacteria, these animals can be used for sentinel surveillance to provide an early warning of the public health risk to humans [106]. […] Rodent die-offs can often be an early indicator of a plague outbreak”.

“Zoonotic disease surveillance is crucial for protection of human and animal health. An integrated, sustainable system that collects data on incidence of disease in both animals and humans is necessary to ensure prompt detection of zoonotic disease outbreaks and a timely and focused response [34]. Currently, surveillance systems for animals and humans [operate] largely independently [34]. This results in an inability to rapidly detect zoonotic diseases, particularly novel emerging diseases, that are detected in the human population only after an outbreak occurs [109]. While most industrialized countries have robust disease surveillance systems, many developing countries currently lack the resources to conduct both ongoing and real-time surveillance [34,43].”

“Acute hepatitis of any cause has similar, usually indistinguishable, signs and symptoms. Acute illness is associated with fever, fatigue, nausea, abdominal pain, followed by signs of liver dysfunction, including jaundice, light to clay-colored stool, dark urine, and easy bruising. The jaundice, dark urine, and abnormal stool are because of the diminished capacity of the inflamed liver to handle the metabolism of bilirubin, which is a breakdown product of hemoglobin released as red blood cells are normally replaced. In severe hepatitis that is associated with fulminant liver disease, the liver’s capacity to produce clotting factors and to clear potential toxic metabolic products is severely impaired, with resultant bleeding and hepatic encephalopathy. […] An effective vaccine to prevent hepatitis A has been available for more than 15 years, and incidence rates of hepatitis A are dropping wherever it is used in routine childhood immunization programs. […] Currently, hepatitis A vaccine is part of the U.S. childhood immunization schedule recommended by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) [31].”

Chronic hepatitis — persistent and ongoing inflammation that can result from chronic infection — usually has minimal to no signs or symptoms […] Hepatitis B and C viruses cause acute hepatitis as well as chronic hepatitis. The acute component is often not recognized as an episode of acute hepatitis, and the chronic infection may have little or no symptoms for many years. With hepatitis B, clearance of infection is age related, as is presentation with symptoms. Over 90% of infants exposed to HBV develop chronic infection, while <1% have symptoms; 5–10% of adults develop chronic infection, but 50% or more have symptoms associated with acute infection. Among those who acquire hepatitis C, 15–45% clear the infection; the remainder have lifelong infection unless treated specifically for hepatitis C.”

“[D]ata are only received on individuals accessing care. Asymptomatic acute infection and poor or unavailable measurements for high risk populations […] have resulted in questionable estimates of the prevalence and incidence of hepatitis B and C. Further, a lack of understanding of the different types of viral hepatitis by many medical providers [18] has led to many undiagnosed individuals living with chronic infection, who are not captured in disease surveillance systems. […] Evaluation of acute HBV and HCV surveillance has demonstrated a lack of sensitivity for identifying acute infection in injection drug users; it is likely that most cases in this population go undetected, even if they receive medical care [36]. […] Best practices for conducting surveillance for chronic hepatitis B and C are not well established. […] The role of health departments in responding to infectious diseases is typically responding to acute disease. Response to chronic HBV infection is targeted to prevention of transmission to contacts of those infected, especially in high risk situations. Because of the high risk of vertical transmission and likely development of chronic disease in exposed newborns, identification and case management of HBV-infected pregnant women and their infants is a high priority. […] For a number of reasons, states do not conduct uniform surveillance for chronic hepatitis C. There is not agreement as to the utility of surveillance for chronic HCV infection, as it is a measurement of prevalent rather than incident cases.”

“Among all nationally notifiable diseases, three STDs (chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis) are consistently in the top five most commonly reported diseases annually. These three STDs made up more than 86% of all reported diseases in the United States in 2010 [2]. […] The true burden of STDs is likely to be higher, as most infections are asymptomatic [4] and are never diagnosed or reported. A synthesis of a variety of data sources estimated that in 2008 there were over 100 million prevalent STDs and nearly 20 million incident STDs in the United States [5]. […] Nationally, 72% of all reported STDs are among persons aged 15–24 years [3], and it is estimated that 1 in 4 females aged 14–19 has an STD [7]. […] In 2011, the rates of chlamydia, gonorrhea, and primary and secondary syphilis among African-­Americans were, respectively, 7.5, 16.9, and 6.7 times the rates among whites [3]. Additionally, men who have sex with men (MSM) are disproportionately infected with STDs. […] several analyses have shown risk ratios above 100 for the associations between being an MSM and having syphilis or HIV [9,10]. […] Many STDs can be transmitted congenitally during pregnancy or birth. In 2008, over 400,000 neonatal deaths and stillbirths were associated with syphilis worldwide […] untreated chlamydia and gonorrhea can cause ophthalmia neonatorum in newborns, which can result in blindness [13]. The medical and societal costs for STDs are high. […] One estimate in 2008 put national costs at $15.6 billion [15].”

“A significant challenge in STD surveillance is that the term “STD” encompasses a variety of infections. Currently, there are over 35 pathogens that can be transmitted sexually, including bacteria […] protozoa […] and ectoparasites […]. Some infections can cause clinical syndromes shortly after exposure, whereas others result in no symptoms or have a long latency period. Some STDs can be easily diagnosed using self-collected swabs, while others require a sample of blood or a physical examination by a clinician. Consequently, no one particular surveillance strategy works for all STDs. […] The asymptomatic nature of most STDs limits inferences from case­-based surveillance, since in order to be counted in this system an infection must be diagnosed and reported. Additionally, many infections never result in disease. For example, an estimated 90% of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections resolve on their own without sequelae [24]. As such, simply counting infections may not be appropriate, and sequelae must also be monitored. […] Strategies for STD surveillance include case reporting; sentinel surveillance; opportunistic surveillance, including use of administrative data and positivity in screened populations; and population-­based studies […] the choice of strategy depends on the type of STD and the population of interest.”

“Determining which diseases and conditions should be included in mandatory case reporting requires balancing the benefits to the public health system (e.g., utility of the data) with the costs and burdens of case reporting. While many epidemiologists and public health practitioners follow the mantra “the more data, the better,” the costs (in both dollars and human resources) of developing and maintaining a robust case­-based reporting system can be large. Case­-based surveillance has been mandated for chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis, and chancroid nationally; but expansion of state­-initiated mandatory reporting for other STDs is controversial.”

August 18, 2017 Posted by | Books, Epidemiology, Immunology, Infectious disease, Medicine | Leave a comment

Harnessing phenotypic heterogeneity to design better therapies

Unlike many of the IAS lectures I’ve recently blogged this one is a new lecture – it was uploaded earlier this week. I have to say that I was very surprised – and disappointed – that the treatment strategy discussed in the lecture had not already been analyzed in a lot of detail and been implemented in clinical practice for some time. Why would you not expect the composition of cancer cell subtypes in the tumour microenvironment to change when you start treatment – in any setting where a subgroup of cancer cells has a different level of responsiveness to treatment than ‘the average’, that would to me seem to be the expected outcome. And concepts such as drug holidays and dose adjustments as treatment responses to evolving drug resistance/treatment failure seem like such obvious approaches to try out here (…the immunologists dealing with HIV infection have been studying such things for decades). I guess ‘better late than never’.

A few papers mentioned/discussed in the lecture:

Impact of Metabolic Heterogeneity on Tumor Growth, Invasion, and Treatment Outcomes.
Adaptive vs continuous cancer therapy: Exploiting space and trade-offs in drug scheduling.
Exploiting evolutionary principles to prolong tumor control in preclinical models of breast cancer.

June 11, 2017 Posted by | Cancer/oncology, Genetics, Immunology, Lectures, Mathematics, Medicine, Studies | Leave a comment

A few diabetes papers of interest

i. Association Between Blood Pressure and Adverse Renal Events in Type 1 Diabetes.

“The Joint National Committee and American Diabetes Association guidelines currently recommend a blood pressure (BP) target of <140/90 mmHg for all adults with diabetes, regardless of type (13). However, evidence used to support this recommendation is primarily based on data from trials of type 2 diabetes (46). The relationship between BP and adverse outcomes in type 1 and type 2 diabetes may differ, given that the type 1 diabetes population is typically much younger at disease onset, hypertension is less frequently present at diagnosis (3), and the basis for the pathophysiology and disease complications may differ between the two populations.

Prior prospective cohort studies (7,8) of patients with type 1 diabetes suggested that lower BP levels (<110–120/70–80 mmHg) at baseline entry were associated with a lower risk of adverse renal outcomes, including incident microalbuminuria. In one trial of antihypertensive treatment in type 1 diabetes (9), assignment to a lower mean arterial pressure (MAP) target of <92 mmHg (corresponding to ∼125/75 mmHg) led to a significant reduction in proteinuria compared with a MAP target of 100–107 mmHg (corresponding to ∼130–140/85–90 mmHg). Thus, it is possible that lower BP (<120/80 mmHg) reduces the risk of important renal outcomes, such as proteinuria, in patients with type 1 diabetes and may provide a synergistic benefit with intensive glycemic control on renal outcomes (1012). However, fewer studies have examined the association between BP levels over time and the risk of more advanced renal outcomes, such as stage III chronic kidney disease (CKD) or end-stage renal disease (ESRD)”.

“The primary objective of this study was to determine whether there is an association between lower BP levels and the risk of more advanced diabetic nephropathy, defined as macroalbuminuria or stage III CKD, within a background of different glycemic control strategies […] We included 1,441 participants with type 1 diabetes between the ages of 13 and 39 years who had previously been randomized to receive intensive versus conventional glycemic control in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT). The exposures of interest were time-updated systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) categories. Outcomes included macroalbuminuria (>300 mg/24 h) or stage III chronic kidney disease (CKD) […] During a median follow-up time of 24 years, there were 84 cases of stage III CKD and 169 cases of macroalbuminuria. In adjusted models, SBP in the 2 (95% CI 1.05–1.21), and a 1.04 times higher risk of ESRD (95% CI 0.77–1.41) in adjusted Cox models. Every 10 mmHg increase in DBP was associated with a 1.17 times higher risk of microalbuminuria (95% CI 1.03–1.32), a 1.15 times higher risk of eGFR decline to 2 (95% CI 1.04–1.29), and a 0.80 times higher risk of ESRD (95% CI 0.47–1.38) in adjusted models. […] Because these data are observational, they cannot prove causation. It remains possible that subtle kidney disease may lead to early elevations in BP, and we cannot rule out the potential for reverse causation in our findings. However, we note similar trends in our data even when imposing a 7-year lag between BP and CKD ascertainment.”

CONCLUSIONS A lower BP (<120/70 mmHg) was associated with a substantially lower risk of adverse renal outcomes, regardless of the prior assigned glycemic control strategy. Interventional trials may be useful to help determine whether the currently recommended BP target of 140/90 mmHg may be too high for optimal renal protection in type 1 diabetes.”

It’s important to keep in mind when interpreting these results that endpoints like ESRD and stage III CKD are not the only relevant outcomes in this setting; even mild-stage kidney disease in diabetics significantly increase the risk of death from cardiovascular disease, and a substantial proportion of patients may die from cardiovascular disease before reaching a late-stage kidney disease endpoint (here’s a relevant link).

Identifying Causes for Excess Mortality in Patients With Diabetes: Closer but Not There Yet.

“A number of epidemiological studies have quantified the risk of death among patients with diabetes and assessed the causes of death (26), with highly varying results […] Overall, the studies to date have confirmed that diabetes is associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality, but the magnitude of this excess risk is highly variable, with the relative risk ranging from 1.15 to 3.15. Nevertheless, all studies agree that mortality is mainly attributable to cardiovascular causes (26). On the other hand, studies of cancer-related death have generally been lacking despite the diabetes–cancer association and a number of plausible biological mechanisms identified to explain this link (8,9). In fact, studies assessing the specific causes of noncardiovascular death in diabetes have been sparse. […] In this issue of Diabetes Care, Baena-Díez et al. (10) report on an observational study of the association between diabetes and cause-specific death. This study involved 55,292 individuals from 12 Spanish population cohorts with no prior history of cardiovascular disease, aged 35 to 79 years, with a 10-year follow-up. […] This study found that individuals with diabetes compared with those without diabetes had a higher risk of cardiovascular death, cancer death, and noncardiovascular noncancer death with similar estimates obtained using the two statistical approaches. […] Baena-Díez et al. (10) showed that individuals with diabetes have an approximately threefold increased risk of cardiovascular mortality, which is much higher than what has been reported by recent studies (5,6). While this may be due to the lack of adjustment for important confounders in this study, there remains uncertainty regarding the magnitude of this increase.”

“[A]ll studies of excess mortality associated with diabetes, including the current one, have produced highly variable results. The reasons may be methodological. For instance, it may be that because of the wide range of age in these studies, comparing the rates of death between the patients with diabetes and those without diabetes using a measure based on the ratio of the rates may be misleading because the ratio can vary by age [it almost certainly does vary by age, US]. Instead, a measure based on the difference in rates may be more appropriate (16). Another issue relates to the fact that the studies include patients with longstanding diabetes of variable duration, resulting in so-called prevalent cohorts that can result in muddled mortality estimates since these are necessarily based on a mix of patients at different stages of disease (17). Thus, a paradigm change may be in order for future observational studies of diabetes and mortality, in the way they are both designed and analyzed. With respect to cancer, such studies will also need to tease out the independent contribution of antidiabetes treatments on cancer incidence and mortality (1820). It is thus clear that the quantification of the excess mortality associated with diabetes per se will need more accurate tools.”

iii. Risk of Cause-Specific Death in Individuals With Diabetes: A Competing Risks Analysis. This is the paper some of the results of which were discussed above. I’ll just include the highlights here:

RESULTS We included 55,292 individuals (15.6% with diabetes and overall mortality of 9.1%). The adjusted hazard ratios showed that diabetes increased mortality risk: 1) cardiovascular death, CSH = 2.03 (95% CI 1.63–2.52) and PSH = 1.99 (1.60–2.49) in men; and CSH = 2.28 (1.75–2.97) and PSH = 2.23 (1.70–2.91) in women; 2) cancer death, CSH = 1.37 (1.13–1.67) and PSH = 1.35 (1.10–1.65) in men; and CSH = 1.68 (1.29–2.20) and PSH = 1.66 (1.25–2.19) in women; and 3) noncardiovascular noncancer death, CSH = 1.53 (1.23–1.91) and PSH = 1.50 (1.20–1.89) in men; and CSH = 1.89 (1.43–2.48) and PSH = 1.84 (1.39–2.45) in women. In all instances, the cumulative mortality function was significantly higher in individuals with diabetes.

CONCLUSIONS Diabetes is associated with premature death from cardiovascular disease, cancer, and noncardiovascular noncancer causes.”

“Summary

Diabetes is associated with premature death from cardiovascular diseases (coronary heart disease, stroke, and heart failure), several cancers (liver, colorectal, and lung), and other diseases (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and liver and kidney disease). In addition, the cause-specific cumulative mortality for cardiovascular, cancer, and noncardiovascular noncancer causes was significantly higher in individuals with diabetes, compared with the general population. The dual analysis with CSH and PSH methods provides a comprehensive view of mortality dynamics in the population with diabetes. This approach identifies the individuals with diabetes as a vulnerable population for several causes of death aside from the traditionally reported cardiovascular death.”

iv. Disability-Free Life-Years Lost Among Adults Aged ≥50 Years With and Without Diabetes.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Adults (n = 20,008) aged 50 years and older were followed from 1998 to 2012 in the Health and Retirement Study, a prospective biannual survey of a nationally representative sample of adults. Diabetes and disability status (defined by mobility loss, difficulty with instrumental activities of daily living [IADL], and/or difficulty with activities of daily living [ADL]) were self-reported. We estimated incidence of disability, remission to nondisability, and mortality. We developed a discrete-time Markov simulation model with a 1-year transition cycle to predict and compare lifetime disability-related outcomes between people with and without diabetes. Data represent the U.S. population in 1998.

RESULTS From age 50 years, adults with diabetes died 4.6 years earlier, developed disability 6–7 years earlier, and spent about 1–2 more years in a disabled state than adults without diabetes. With increasing baseline age, diabetes was associated with significant (P < 0.05) reductions in the number of total and disability-free life-years, but the absolute difference in years between those with and without diabetes was less than at younger baseline age. Men with diabetes spent about twice as many of their remaining years disabled (20–24% of remaining life across the three disability definitions) as men without diabetes (12–16% of remaining life across the three disability definitions). Similar associations between diabetes status and disability-free and disabled years were observed among women.

CONCLUSIONS Diabetes is associated with a substantial reduction in nondisabled years, to a greater extent than the reduction of longevity. […] Using a large, nationally representative cohort of Americans aged 50 years and older, we found that diabetes is associated with a substantial deterioration of nondisabled years and that this is a greater number of years than the loss of longevity associated with diabetes. On average, a middle-aged adult with diabetes has an onset of disability 6–7 years earlier than one without diabetes, spends 1–2 more years with disability, and loses 7 years of disability-free life to the condition. Although other nationally representative studies have reported large reductions in complications (9) and mortality among the population with diabetes in recent decades (1), these studies, akin to our results, suggest that diabetes continues to have a substantial impact on morbidity and quality of remaining years of life.”

v. Association Between Use of Lipid-Lowering Therapy and Cardiovascular Diseases and Death in Individuals With Type 1 Diabetes.

“People with type 1 diabetes have a documented shorter life expectancy than the general population without diabetes (1). Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the main cause of the excess morbidity and mortality, and despite advances in management and therapy, individuals with type 1 diabetes have a markedly elevated risk of cardiovascular events and death compared with the general population (2).

Lipid-lowering treatment with hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) prevents major cardiovascular events and death in a broad spectrum of patients (3,4). […] We hypothesized that primary prevention with lipid-lowering therapy (LLT) can reduce the incidence of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in individuals with type 1 diabetes. The aim of the study was to examine this in a nationwide longitudinal cohort study of patients with no history of CVD. […] A total of 24,230 individuals included in 2006–2008 NDR with type 1 diabetes without a history of CVD were followed until 31 December 2012; 18,843 were untreated and 5,387 treated with LLT [Lipid-Lowering Therapy] (97% statins). The mean follow-up was 6.0 years. […] Hazard ratios (HRs) for treated versus untreated were as follows: cardiovascular death 0.60 (95% CI 0.50–0.72), all-cause death 0.56 (0.48–0.64), fatal/nonfatal stroke 0.56 (0.46–0.70), fatal/nonfatal acute myocardial infarction 0.78 (0.66–0.92), fatal/nonfatal coronary heart disease 0.85 (0.74–0.97), and fatal/nonfatal CVD 0.77 (0.69–0.87).

CONCLUSIONS This observational study shows that LLT is associated with 22–44% reduction in the risk of CVD and cardiovascular death among individuals with type 1 diabetes without history of CVD and underlines the importance of primary prevention with LLT to reduce cardiovascular risk in type 1 diabetes.”

vi. Prognostic Classification Factors Associated With Development of Multiple Autoantibodies, Dysglycemia, and Type 1 Diabetes—A Recursive Partitioning Analysis.

“In many prognostic factor studies, multivariate analyses using the Cox proportional hazards model are applied to identify independent prognostic factors. However, the coefficient estimates derived from the Cox proportional hazards model may be biased as a result of violating assumptions of independence. […] RPA [Recursive Partitioning Analysis] classification is a useful tool that could prioritize the prognostic factors and divide the subjects into distinctive groups. RPA has an advantage over the proportional hazards model in identifying prognostic factors because it does not require risk factor independence and, as a nonparametric technique, makes no requirement on the underlying distributions of the variables considered. Hence, it relies on fewer modeling assumptions. Also, because the method is designed to divide subjects into groups based on the length of survival, it defines groupings for risk classification, whereas Cox regression models do not. Moreover, there is no need to explicitly include covariate interactions because of the recursive splitting structure of tree model construction.”

“This is the first study that characterizes the risk factors associated with the transition from one preclinical stage to the next following a recommended staging classification system (9). The tree-structured prediction model reveals that the risk parameters are not the same across each transition. […] Based on the RPA classification, the subjects at younger age and with higher GAD65Ab [an important biomarker in the context of autoimmune forms of diabetes, US – here’s a relevant link] titer are at higher risk for progression to multiple positive autoantibodies from a single autoantibody (seroconversion). Approximately 70% of subjects with a single autoantibody were positive for GAD65Ab, much higher than for insulin autoantibody (24%) and IA-2A [here’s a relevant link – US] (5%). Our study results are consistent with those of others (2224) in that seroconversion is age related. Previous studies in infants and children at an early age have shown that progression from single to two or more autoantibodies occurs more commonly in children 25). The subjects ≤16 years of age had almost triple the 5-year risk compared with subjects >16 years of age at the same GAD65Ab titer level. Hence, not all individuals with a single islet autoantibody can be thought of as being at low risk for disease progression.”

“This is the first study that identifies the risk factors associated with the timing of transitions from one preclinical stage to the next in the development of T1D. Based on RPA risk parameters, we identify the characteristics of groups with similar 5-year risks for advancing to the next preclinical stage. It is clear that individuals with one or more autoantibodies or with dysglycemia are not homogeneous with regard to the risk of disease progression. Also, there are differences in risk factors at each stage that are associated with increased risk of progression. The potential benefit of identifying these groups allows for a more informed discussion of diabetes risk and the selective enrollment of individuals into clinical trials whose risk more appropriately matches the potential benefit of an experimental intervention. Since the risk levels in these groups are substantial, their definition makes possible the design of more efficient trials with target sample sizes that are feasible, opening up the field of prevention to additional at-risk cohorts. […] Our results support the evidence that autoantibody titers are strong predictors at each transition leading to T1D development. The risk of the development of multiple autoantibodies was significantly increased when the GAD65Ab titer level was elevated, and the risk of the development of dysglycemia was increased when the IA-2A titer level increased. These indicate that better risk prediction on the timing of transitions can be obtained by evaluating autoantibody titers. The results also suggest that an autoantibody titer should be carefully considered in planning prevention trials for T1D in addition to the number of positive autoantibodies and the type of autoantibody.”

May 17, 2017 Posted by | Diabetes, Epidemiology, Health Economics, Immunology, Medicine, Nephrology, Statistics, Studies | Leave a comment

Today’s Landscape of Pharmaceutical Research in Cancer

It’s been a while since I watched this lecture so I don’t remember the details very well, but I usually add notes in my bookmarks when I watch lectures so that I know what details to include in my comments here on the blog, and I have added the details from the bookmark notes below.

It is a short lecture, the lecture itself lasts only roughly 30 minutes; it doesn’t really start until roughly the 9 minutes and 30 seconds mark, and it finishes around the 44 min mark (the rest is Q&A – I skipped some of the introduction, but watched the Q&A). The lecture is not very technical, I think the content is perfectly understandable also to people without a medical background. One data point from the lecture which I thought worth including in these comments is this: According to Sigal, “roughly 30 per cent of the biopharmaceutical industry’s portfolio … is focused on research in oncology.”

May 17, 2017 Posted by | Cancer/oncology, Health Economics, Immunology, Lectures, Medicine, Pharmacology | Leave a comment

Standing on the Shoulders of Mice: Aging T-cells

Most of the lecture is not about mice, but rather about stuff like this and this (both papers are covered in the lecture). I’ve read about related topics before (see e.g this), but if you haven’t some parts of the lecture will probably be too technical for you to follow.

May 3, 2017 Posted by | Cancer/oncology, Cardiology, Genetics, Immunology, Lectures, Medicine, Papers | Leave a comment

Biodemography of aging (II)

In my first post about the book I included a few general remarks about the book and what it’s about. In this post I’ll continue my coverage of the book, starting with a few quotes from and observations related to the content in chapter 4 (‘Evidence for Dependence Among Diseases‘).

“To compare the effects of public health policies on a population’s characteristics, researchers commonly estimate potential gains in life expectancy that would result from eradication or reduction of selected causes of death. For example, Keyfitz (1977) estimated that eradication of cancer would result in 2.265 years of increase in male life expectancy at birth (or by 3 % compared to its 1964 level). Lemaire (2005) found that the potential gain in the U.S. life expectancy from cancer eradication would not exceed 3 years for both genders. Conti et al. (1999) calculated that the potential gain in life expectancy from cancer eradication in Italy would be 3.84 years for males and 2.77 years for females. […] All these calculations assumed independence between cancer and other causes of death. […] for today’s populations in developed countries, where deaths from chronic non-communicable diseases are in the lead, this assumption might no longer be valid. An important feature of such chronic diseases is that they often develop in clusters manifesting positive correlations with each other. The conventional view is that, in a case of such dependence, the effect of cancer eradication on life expectancy would be even smaller.”

I think the great majority of people you asked would have assumed that the beneficial effect of hypothetical cancer eradication in humans on human life expectancy would be much larger than this, but that’s just an impression. I’ve seen estimates like these before, so I was not surprised – but I think many people would be if they knew this. A very large number of people die as a result of developing cancer today, but the truth of the matter is that if they hadn’t died from cancer they’d have died anyway, and on average probably not really all that much later. I linked to Richard Alexander’s comments on this topic in my last post about the book, and again his observations apply so I thought I might as well add the relevant quote from the book here:

“In the course of working against senescence, selection will tend to remove, one by one, the most frequent sources of mortality as a result of senescence. Whenever a single cause of mortality, such as a particular malfunction of any vital organ, becomes the predominant cause of mortality, then selection will more effectively reduce the significance of that particular defect (meaning those who lack it will outreproduce) until some other achieves greater relative significance. […] the result will be that all organs and systems will tend to deteriorate together. […] The point is that as we age, and as senescence proceeds, large numbers of potential sources of mortality tend to lurk ever more malevolently just “below the surface,”so that, unfortunately, the odds are very high against any dramatic lengthening of the maximum human lifetime through technology.”

Remove one cause of death and there are plenty of others standing in line behind it. We already knew that; two hundred years ago one out of every four deaths in England was the result of tuberculosis, but developing treatments for tuberculosis and other infectious diseases did not mean that English people stopped dying; these days they just die from cardiovascular disease and cancer instead. Do note in the context of that quote that Alexander is talking about the maximum human lifetime, not average life expectancy; again, we know and have known for a long time that human technology can have a dramatic effect on the latter variable. Of course a shift in one distribution will be likely to have spill-over effects on the other (if more people are alive at the age of 70, the potential group of people also living on to reach e.g. 100 years is higher, even if the mortality rate for the 70-100 year old group did not change) the point is just that these effects are secondary effects and are likely to be marginal at best.

Anyway, some more stuff from the chapter. Just like the previous chapter in the book did, this one also includes analyses of very large data sets:

The Multiple Cause of Death (MCD) data files contain information about underlying and secondary causes of death in the U.S. during 1968–2010. In total, they include more than 65 million individual death certificate records. […] we used data for the period 1979–2004.”

There’s some formal modelling stuff in the chapter which I won’t go into in detail here, this is the chapter in which I encountered the comment about ‘the multivariate lognormal frailty model’ I included in my first post about the book. One of the things the chapter looks at are the joint frequencies of deaths from cancer and other fatal diseases; it turns out that there are multiple diseases that are negatively related with cancer as a cause of death when you look at the population-level data mentioned above. The chapter goes into some of the biological mechanisms which may help explain why these associations look the way they do, and I’ll quote a little from that part of the coverage. A key idea here is (as always..?) that there are tradeoffs at play; some genetic variants may help protect you against e.g. cancer, but at the same time increase the risk of other diseases for the same reason that they protect you against cancer. In the context of the relationship between cancer deaths and deaths from other diseases they note in the conclusion that: “One potential biological mechanism underlying the negative correlation among cancer and other diseases could be related to the differential role of apoptosis in the development of these diseases.” The chapter covers that stuff in significantly more detail, and I decided to add some observations from the chapter on these topics below:

“Studying the role of the p53 gene in the connection between cancer and cellular aging, Campisi (2002, 2003) suggested that longevity may depend on a balance between tumor suppression and tissue renewal mechanisms. […] Although the mechanism by which p53 regulates lifespan remains to be determined, […] findings highlight the possibility that careful manipulation of p53 activity during adult life may result in beneficial effects on healthy lifespan. Other tumor suppressor genes are also involved in regulation of longevity. […] In humans, Dumont et al. (2003) demonstrated that a replacement of arginine (Arg) by proline (Pro) at position 72 of human p53 decreases its ability to initiate apoptosis, suggesting that these variants may differently affect longevity and vulnerability to cancer. Van Heemst et al. (2005) showed that individuals with the Pro/Pro genotype of p53 corresponding to reduced apoptosis in cells had significantly increased overall survival (by 41%) despite a more than twofold increased proportion of cancer deaths at ages 85+, together with a decreased proportion of deaths from senescence related causes such as COPD, fractures, renal failure, dementia, and senility. It was suggested that human p53 may protect against cancer but at a cost of longevity. […] Other biological factors may also play opposing roles in cancer and aging and thus contribute to respective trade-offs […]. E.g., higher levels of IGF-1 [have been] linked to both cancer and attenuation of phenotypes of physical senescence, such as frailty, sarcopenia, muscle atrophy, and heart failure, as well as to better muscle regeneration”.

“The connection between cancer and longevity may potentially be mediated by trade-offs between cancer and other diseases which do not necessarily involve any basic mechanism of aging per se. In humans, it could result, for example, from trade-offs between vulnerabilities to cancer and AD, or to cancer and CVD […] There may be several biological mechanisms underlying the negative correlation among cancer and these diseases. One can be related to the differential role of apoptosis in their development. For instance, in stroke, the number of dying neurons following brain ischemia (and thus probability of paralysis or death) may be less in the case of a downregulated apoptosis. As for cancer, the downregulated apoptosis may, conversely, mean a higher risk of the disease because more cells may survive damage associated with malignant transformation. […] Also, the role of the apoptosis may be different or even opposite in the development of cancer and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Indeed, suppressed apoptosis is a hallmark of cancer, while increased apoptosis is a typical feature of AD […]. If so, then chronically upregulated apoptosis (e.g., due to a genetic polymorphism) may potentially be protective against cancer, but be deleterious in relation to AD. […] Increased longevity can be associated not only with increased but also with decreased chances of cancer. […] The most popular to-date “anti-aging” intervention, caloric restriction, often results in increased maximal life span along with reduced tumor incidence in laboratory rodents […] Because the rate of apoptosis was significantly and consistently higher in food restricted mice regardless of age, James et al. (1998) suggested that caloric restriction may have a cancer-protective effect primarily due to the upregulated apoptosis in these mice.”

Below I’ll discuss content covered in chapter 5, which deals with ‘Factors That May Increase Vulnerability to Cancer and Longevity in Modern Human Populations’. I’ll start out with a few quotes:

“Currently, the overall cancer incidence rate (age-adjusted) in the less developed world is roughly half that seen in the more developed world […] For countries with similar levels of economic development but different climate and ethnic characteristics […], the cancer rate patterns look much more similar than for the countries that share the same geographic location, climate, and ethnic distribution, but differ in the level of economic development […]. This suggests that different countries may share common factors linked to economic prosperity that could be primarily responsible for the modern increases in overall cancer risk. […] Population aging (increases in the proportion of older people) may […] partly explain the rise in the global cancer burden […]; however, it cannot explain increases in age-specific cancer incidence rates over time […]. Improved diagnostics and elevated exposures to carcinogens may explain increases in rates for selected cancer sites, but they cannot fully explain the increase in the overall cancer risk, nor incidence rate trends for most individual cancers (Jemal et al. 2008, 2013).”

“[W]e propose that the association between the overall cancer risk and the economic progress and spread of the Western lifestyle could in part be explained by the higher proportion of individuals more susceptible to cancer in the populations of developed countries, and discuss several mechanisms of such an increase in the proportion of the vulnerable. […] mechanisms include but are not limited to: (i) Improved survival of frail individuals. […] (ii) Avoiding or reducing traditional exposures. Excessive disinfection and hygiene typical of the developed world can diminish exposure to some factors that were abundant in the past […] Insufficiently or improperly trained immune systems may be less capable of resisting cancer. (iii) Burden of novel exposures. Some new medicines, cleaning agents, foods, etc., that are not carcinogenic themselves may still affect the natural ways of processing carcinogens in the body, and through this increase a person’s susceptibility to established carcinogens. [If this one sounds implausible to you, I’ll remind you that drug metabolism is complicatedUS] […] (iv) Some of the factors linked to economic prosperity and the Western lifestyle (e.g., delayed childbirth and food enriched with growth factors) may antagonistically influence aging and cancer risk.”

They provide detailed coverage of all of these mechanisms in the chapter, below I have included a few select observations from that part of the coverage.

“There was a dramatic decline in infant and childhood mortality in developed countries during the last century. For example, the infant mortality rate in the United States was about 6 % of live births in 1935, 3 % in 1950, 1.3 % in 1980, and 0.6 % in 2010. That is, it declined tenfold over the course of 75 years […] Because almost all children (including those with immunity deficiencies) survive, the proportion of the children who are inherently more vulnerable could be higher in the more developed countries. This is consistent with a typically higher proportion of children with chronic inflammatory immune disorders such as asthma and allergy in the populations of developed countries compared to less developed ones […] Over-reduction of such traditional exposures may result in an insufficiently/improperly trained immune system early in life, which could make it less able to resist diseases, including cancer later in life […] There is accumulating evidence of the important role of these effects in cancer risk. […] A number of studies have connected excessive disinfection and lack of antigenic stimulation (especially in childhood) of the immune system in Westernized communities with increased risks of both chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer […] The IARC data on migrants to Israel […] allow for comparison of the age trajectories of cancer incidence rates between adult Jews who live in Israel but were born in other countries […] [These data] show that Jews born in less developed regions (Africa and Asia) have overall lower cancer risk than those born in the more developed regions (Europe and America).  The discrepancy is unlikely to be due to differences in cancer diagnostics because at the moment of diagnosis all these people were citizens of the same country with the same standard of medical care. These results suggest that surviving childhood and growing up in a less developed country with diverse environmental exposures might help form resistance to cancer that lasts even after moving to a high risk country.”

I won’t go much into the ‘burden of novel exposures’ part, but I should note that exposures that may be relevant include factors like paracetamol use and antibiotics for treatment of H. pylori. Paracetamol is not considered carcinogenic by the IARC, but we know from animal studies that if you give rats paratamol and then expose them to an established carcinogen (with the straightforward name N-nitrosoethyl-N-hydroxyethylamine), the number of rats developing kidney cancer goes up. In the context of H. pylori, we know that these things may cause stomach cancer, but when you treat rats with metronidazol (which is used to treat H. pylori) and expose them to an established carcinogen, they’re more likely to develop colon cancer. The link between colon cancer and antibiotics use has been noted in other contexts as well; decreased microbial diversity after antibiotics use may lead to suppression of the bifidobacteria and promotion of E. coli in the colon, the metabolic products of which may lead to increased cancer risk. Over time an increase in colon cancer risk and a decrease in stomach cancer risk has been observed in developed societies, but aside from changes in diet another factor which may play a role is population-wide exposure to antibiotics. Colon and stomach cancers are incidentally not the only ones of interest in this particular context; it has also been found that exposure to chloramphenicol, a broad-spectrum antibiotic used since the 40es, increases the risk of lymphoma in mice when the mice are exposed to a known carcinogen, despite the drug itself again not being clearly carcinogenic on its own.

Many new exposures aside from antibiotics are of course relevant. Two other drug-related ones that might be worth mentioning are hormone replacement therapy and contraceptives. HRT is not as commonly used today as it was in the past, but to give some idea of the scope here, half of all women in the US aged 50-65 are estimated to have been on HRT at the peak of its use, around the turn of the millennium, and HRT is assumed to be partly responsible for the higher incidence of hormone-related cancers observed in female populations living in developed countries. It’s of some note that the use of HRT dropped dramatically shortly after this peak (from 61 million prescriptions in 2001 to 21 million in 2004), and that the incidence of estrogen-receptor positive cancers subsequently dropped. As for oral contraceptives, these have been in use since the 1960s, and combined hormonal contraceptives are known to increase the risk of liver- and breast cancer, while seemingly also having a protective effect against endometrial cancer and ovarian cancer. The authors speculate that some of the cancer incidence changes observed in the US during the latter half of the last century, with a decline in female endometrial and ovarian cancer combined with an increase in breast- and liver cancer, could in part be related to widespread use of these drugs. An estimated 10% of all women of reproductive age alive in the world, and 16% of those living in the US, are estimated to be using combined hormonal contraceptives. In the context of the protective effect of the drugs, it should perhaps be noted that endometrial cancer in particular is strongly linked to obesity so if you are not overweight you are relatively low-risk.

Many ‘exposures’ in a cancer context are not drug-related. For example women in Western societies tend to go into menopause at a higher age, and higher age of menopause has been associated with hormone-related cancers; but again the picture is not clear in terms of how the variable affects longevity, considering that later menopause has also been linked to increased longevity in several large studies. In the studies the women did have higher mortality from the hormone-related cancers, but on the other hand they were less likely to die from some of the other causes, such as pneumonia, influenza, and falls. Age of childbirth is also a variable where there are significant differences between developed countries and developing countries, and this variable may also be relevant to cancer incidence as it has been linked to breast cancer and melanoma; in one study women who first gave birth after the age of 35 had a 40% increased risk of breast cancer compared to mothers who gave birth before the age of 20 (good luck ‘controlling for everything’ in a context like that, but…), and in a meta-analysis the relative risk for melanoma was 1.47 for women in the oldest age group having given birth, compared to the youngest (again, good luck controlling for everything, but at least it’s not just one study). Lest you think this literature only deals with women, it’s also been found that parental age seems to be linked to cancers in the offspring (higher parental age -> higher cancer risk in the offspring), though the effect sizes are not mentioned in the coverage.

Here’s what they conclude at the end of the chapter:

“Some of the factors associated with economic prosperity and a Western lifestyle may influence both aging and vulnerability to cancer, sometimes oppositely. Current evidence supports a possibility of trade-offs between cancer and aging-related phenotypes […], which could be influenced by delayed reproduction and exposures to growth factors […]. The latter may be particularly beneficial at very old age. This is because the higher levels of growth factors may attenuate some phenotypes of physical senescence, such as decline in regenerative and healing ability, sarcopenia, frailty, elderly fractures and heart failure due to muscles athrophy. They may also increase the body’s vulnerability to cancer, e.g., through growth promoting and anti-apoptotic effects […]. The increase in vulnerability to cancer due to growth factors can be compatible with extreme longevity because cancer is a major contributor to mortality mainly before age 85, while senescence-related causes (such as physical frailty) become major contributors to mortality at oldest old ages (85+). In this situation, the impact of growth factors on vulnerability to death could be more deleterious in middle-to-old life (~before 85) and more beneficial at older ages (85+).

The complex relationships between aging, cancer, and longevity are challenging. This complexity warns against simplified approaches to extending longevity without taking into account the possible trade-offs between phenotypes of physical aging and various health disorders, as well as the differential impacts of such tradeoffs on mortality risks at different ages (e.g., Ukraintseva and Yashin 2003a; Yashin et al. 2009; Ukraintseva et al. 2010, 2016).”

March 7, 2017 Posted by | Books, Cancer/oncology, Epidemiology, Genetics, Immunology, Medicine, Pharmacology | Leave a comment

The Ageing Immune System and Health (II)

Here’s the first post about the book. I finished it a while ago but I recently realized I had not completed my intended coverage of the book here on the blog back then, and as some of the book’s material sort-of-kind-of relates to material encountered in a book I’m currently reading (Biodemography of Aging) I decided I might as well finish my coverage of the book now in order to review some things I might have forgot in the meantime, by providing coverage here of some of the material covered in the second half of the book. It’s a nice book with some interesting observations, but as I also pointed out in my first post it is definitely not an easy read. Below I have included some observations from the book’s second half.

Lungs:

“The aged lung is characterised by airspace enlargement similar to, but not identical with acquired emphysema [4]. Such tissue damage is detected even in non-smokers above 50 years of age as the septa of the lung alveoli are destroyed and the enlarged alveolar structures result in a decreased surface for gas exchange […] Additional problems are that surfactant production decreases with age [6] increasing the effort needed to expand the lungs during inhalation in the already reduced thoracic cavity volume where the weakened muscles are unable to thoroughly ventilate. […] As ageing is associated with respiratory muscle strength reduction, coughing becomes difficult making it progressively challenging to eliminate inhaled particles, pollens, microbes, etc. Additionally, ciliary beat frequency (CBF) slows down with age impairing the lungs’ first line of defence: mucociliary clearance [9] as the cilia can no longer repel invading microorganisms and particles. Consequently e.g. bacteria can more easily colonise the airways leading to infections that are frequent in the pulmonary tract of the older adult.”

“With age there are dramatic changes in neutrophil function, including reduced chemotaxis, phagocytosis and bactericidal mechanisms […] reduced bactericidal function will predispose to infection but the reduced chemotaxis also has consequences for lung tissue as this results in increased tissue bystander damage from neutrophil elastases released during migration […] It is currently accepted that alterations in pulmonary PPAR profile, more precisely loss of PPARγ activity, can lead to inflammation, allergy, asthma, COPD, emphysema, fibrosis, and cancer […]. Since it has been reported that PPARγ activity decreases with age, this provides a possible explanation for the increasing incidence of these lung diseases and conditions in older individuals [6].”

Cancer:

“Age is an important risk factor for cancer and subjects aged over 60 also have a higher risk of comorbidities. Approximately 50 % of neoplasms occur in patients older than 70 years […] a major concern for poor prognosis is with cancer patients over 70–75 years. These patients have a lower functional reserve, a higher risk of toxicity after chemotherapy, and an increased risk of infection and renal complications that lead to a poor quality of life. […] [Whereas] there is a difference in organs with higher cancer incidence in developed versus developing countries [,] incidence increases with ageing almost irrespective of country […] The findings from Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Program [SEERincidentally I likely shall at some point discuss this one in much more detail, as the aforementioned biodemography textbook covers this data in a lot of detail.. – US] [6] show that almost a third of all cancer are diagnosed after the age of 75 years and 70 % of cancer-related deaths occur after the age of 65 years. […] The traditional clinical trial focus is on younger and healthier patient, i.e. with few or no co-morbidities. These restrictions have resulted in a lack of data about the optimal treatment for older patients [7] and a poor evidence base for therapeutic decisions. […] In the older patient, neutropenia, anemia, mucositis, cardiomyopathy and neuropathy — the toxic effects of chemotherapy — are more pronounced […] The correction of comorbidities and malnutrition can lead to greater safety in the prescription of chemotherapy […] Immunosenescence is a general classification for changes occurring in the immune system during the ageing process, as the distribution and function of cells involved in innate and adaptive immunity are impaired or remodelled […] Immunosenescence is considered a major contributor to cancer development in aged individuals“.

Neurodegenerative diseases:

“Dementia and age-related vision loss are major causes of disability in our ageing population and it is estimated that a third of people aged over 75 are affected. […] age is the largest risk factor for the development of neurodegenerative diseases […] older patients with comorbidities such as atherosclerosis, type II diabetes or those suffering from repeated or chronic systemic bacterial and viral infections show earlier onset and progression of clinical symptoms […] analysis of post-mortem brain tissue from healthy older individuals has provided evidence that the presence of misfolded proteins alone does not correlate with cognitive decline and dementia, implying that additional factors are critical for neural dysfunction. We now know that innate immune genes and life-style contribute to the onset and progression of age-related neuronal dysfunction, suggesting that chronic activation of the immune system plays a key role in the underlying mechanisms that lead to irreversible tissue damage in the CNS. […] Collectively these studies provide evidence for a critical role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of a range of neurodegenerative diseases, but the factors that drive or initiate inflammation remain largely elusive.”

“The effect of infection, mimicked experimentally by administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has revealed that immune to brain communication is a critical component of a host organism’s response to infection and a collection of behavioural and metabolic adaptations are initiated over the course of the infection with the purpose of restricting the spread of a pathogen, optimising conditions for a successful immune response and preventing the spread of infection to other organisms [10]. These behaviours are mediated by an innate immune response and have been termed ‘sickness behaviours’ and include depression, reduced appetite, anhedonia, social withdrawal, reduced locomotor activity, hyperalgesia, reduced motivation, cognitive impairment and reduced memory encoding and recall […]. Metabolic adaptation to infection include fever, altered dietary intake and reduction in the bioavailability of nutrients that may facilitate the growth of a pathogen such as iron and zinc [10]. These behavioural and metabolic adaptions are evolutionary highly conserved and also occur in humans”.

“Sickness behaviour and transient microglial activation are beneficial for individuals with a normal, healthy CNS, but in the ageing or diseased brain the response to peripheral infection can be detrimental and increases the rate of cognitive decline. Aged rodents exhibit exaggerated sickness and prolonged neuroinflammation in response to systemic infection […] Older people who contract a bacterial or viral infection or experience trauma postoperatively, also show exaggerated neuroinflammatory responses and are prone to develop delirium, a condition which results in a severe short term cognitive decline and a long term decline in brain function […] Collectively these studies demonstrate that peripheral inflammation can increase the accumulation of two neuropathological hallmarks of AD, further strengthening the hypothesis that inflammation i[s] involved in the underlying pathology. […] Studies from our own laboratory have shown that AD patients with mild cognitive impairment show a fivefold increased rate of cognitive decline when contracting a systemic urinary tract or respiratory tract infection […] Apart from bacterial infection, chronic viral infections have also been linked to increased incidence of neurodegeneration, including cytomegalovirus (CMV). This virus is ubiquitously distributed in the human population, and along with other age-related diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer, has been associated with increased risk of developing vascular dementia and AD [66, 67].”

Frailty:

“Frailty is associated with changes to the immune system, importantly the presence of a pro-inflammatory environment and changes to both the innate and adaptive immune system. Some of these changes have been demonstrated to be present before the clinical features of frailty are apparent suggesting the presence of potentially modifiable mechanistic pathways. To date, exercise programme interventions have shown promise in the reversal of frailty and related physical characteristics, but there is no current evidence for successful pharmacological intervention in frailty. […] In practice, acute illness in a frail person results in a disproportionate change in a frail person’s functional ability when faced with a relatively minor physiological stressor, associated with a prolonged recovery time […] Specialist hospital services such as surgery [15], hip fractures [16] and oncology [17] have now begun to recognise frailty as an important predictor of mortality and morbidity.

I should probably mention here that this is another area where there’s an overlap between this book and the biodemography text I’m currently reading; chapter 7 of the latter text is about ‘Indices of Cumulative Deficits’ and covers this kind of stuff in a lot more detail than does this one, including e.g. detailed coverage of relevant statistical properties of one such index. Anyway, back to the coverage:

“Population based studies have demonstrated that the incidence of infection and subsequent mortality is higher in populations of frail people. […] The prevalence of pneumonia in a nursing home population is 30 times higher than the general population [39, 40]. […] The limited data available demonstrates that frailty is associated with a state of chronic inflammation. There is also evidence that inflammageing predates a diagnosis of frailty suggesting a causative role. […] A small number of studies have demonstrated a dysregulation of the innate immune system in frailty. Frail adults have raised white cell and neutrophil count. […] High white cell count can predict frailty at a ten year follow up [70]. […] A recent meta-analysis and four individual systematic reviews have found beneficial evidence of exercise programmes on selected physical and functional ability […] exercise interventions may have no positive effect in operationally defined frail individuals. […] To date there is no clear evidence that pharmacological interventions improve or ameliorate frailty.”

Exercise:

“[A]s we get older the time and intensity at which we exercise is severely reduced. Physical inactivity now accounts for a considerable proportion of age-related disease and mortality. […] Regular exercise has been shown to improve neutrophil microbicidal functions which reduce the risk of infectious disease. Exercise participation is also associated with increased immune cell telomere length, and may be related to improved vaccine responses. The anti-inflammatory effect of regular exercise and negative energy balance is evident by reduced inflammatory immune cell signatures and lower inflammatory cytokine concentrations. […] Reduced physical activity is associated with a positive energy balance leading to increased adiposity and subsequently systemic inflammation [5]. […] Elevated neutrophil counts accompany increased inflammation with age and the increased ratio of neutrophils to lymphocytes is associated with many age-related diseases including cancer [7]. Compared to more active individuals, less active and overweight individuals have higher circulating neutrophil counts [8]. […] little is known about the intensity, duration and type of exercise which can provide benefits to neutrophil function. […] it remains unclear whether exercise and physical activity can override the effects of NK cell dysfunction in the old. […] A considerable number of studies have assessed the effects of acute and chronic exercise on measures of T-cell immunesenescence including T cell subsets, phenotype, proliferation, cytokine production, chemotaxis, and co-stimulatory capacity. […] Taken together exercise appears to promote an anti-inflammatory response which is mediated by altered adipocyte function and improved energy metabolism leading to suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokine production in immune cells.”

February 24, 2017 Posted by | Biology, Books, Cancer/oncology, Epidemiology, Immunology, Medicine, Neurology | Leave a comment

Diabetes and the Brain (II)

Here’s my first post about the book, which I recently finished – here’s my goodreads review. I added the book to my list of favourite books on goodreads, it’s a great textbook. Below some observations from the first few chapters of the book.

“Several studies report T1D [type 1 diabetes] incidence numbers of 0.1–36.8/100,000 subjects worldwide (2). Above the age of 15 years ketoacidosis at presentation occurs on average in 10% of the population; in children ketoacidosis at presentation is more frequent (3, 4). Overall, publications report a male predominance (1.8 male/female ratio) and a seasonal pattern with higher incidence in November through March in European countries. Worldwide, the incidence of T1D is higher in more developed countries […] After asthma, T1D is a leading cause of chronic disease in children. […]  twin studies show a low concordant prevalence of T1D of only 30–55%. […] Diabetes mellitus type 1 may be sporadic or associated with other autoimmune diseases […] The latter has been classified as autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type II (APS-II). APS-II is a polygenic disorder with a female preponderance which typically occurs between the ages of 20 and 40 years […] In clinical practice, anti-thyroxine peroxidase (TPO) positive hypothyroidism is the most frequent concomitant autoimmune disease in type 1 diabetic patients, therefore all type 1 diabetic patients should annually be screened for the presence of anti-TPO antibodies. Other frequently associated disorders are atrophic gastritis leading to vitamin B12 deficiency (pernicious anemia) and vitiligo. […] The normal human pancreas contains a superfluous amount of β-cells. In T1D, β-cell destruction therefore remains asymptomatic until a critical β-cell reserve is left. This destructive process takes months to years […] Only in a minority of type 1 diabetic patients does the disease begin with diabetic ketoacidosis, the majority presents with a milder course that may be mistaken as type 2 diabetes (7).”

“Insulin is the main regulator of glucose metabolism by stimulating glucose uptake in tissues and glycogen storage in liver and muscle and by inhibiting gluconeogenesis in the liver (11). Moreover, insulin is a growth factor for cells and cell differentiation, and acting as anabolic hormone insulin stimulates lipogenesis and protein synthesis. Glucagon is the counterpart of insulin and is secreted by the α-cells in the pancreatic islets in an inversely proportional quantity to the insulin concentration. Glucagon, being a catabolic hormone, stimulates glycolysis and gluconeogenesis in the liver as well as lipolysis and uptake of amino acids in the liver. Epinephrine and norepinephrine have comparable catabolic effects […] T1D patients lose the glucagon response to hypoglycemia after several years, when all β-cells are destructed […] The risk of hypoglycemia increases with improved glycemic control, autonomic neuropathy, longer duration of diabetes, and the presence of long-term complications (17) […] Long-term complications are prevalent in any population of type 1 diabetic patients with increasing prevalence and severity in relation to disease duration […] The pathogenesis of diabetic complications is multifactorial, complicated, and not yet fully elucidated.”

“Cataract is much more frequent in patients with diabetes and tends to become clinically significant at a younger age. Glaucoma is markedly increased in diabetes too.” (I was unaware of this).

“T1D should be considered as an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis […] An older study shows that the cumulative mortality of coronary heart disease in T1D was 35% by the age 55 (34). In comparison, the Framingham Heart Study showed a cardiovascular mortality of 8% of men and 4% of women without diabetes, respectively. […] Atherosclerosis is basically a systemic disease. Patients with one clinically apparent localization are at risk for other manifestations. […] Musculoskeletal disease in diabetes is best viewed as a systemic disorder with involvement of connective tissue. Potential pathophysiological mechanisms that play a role are glycosylation of collagen, abnormal cross-linking of collagen, and increased collagen hydration […] Dupuytren’s disease […] may be observed in up to 42% of adults with diabetes mellitus, typically in patients with long-standing T1D. Dupuytren’s is characterized by thickening of the palmar fascia due to fibrosis with nodule formation and contracture, leading to flexion contractures of the digits, most commonly affecting the fourth and fifth digits. […] Foot problems in diabetes are common and comprise ulceration, infection, and gangrene […] The lifetime risk of a foot ulcer for diabetic patients is about 15% (42). […] Wound depth is an important determinant of outcome (46, 47). Deep ulcers with cellulitis or abscess formation often involve osteomyelitis. […] Radiologic changes occur late in the course of osteomyelitis and negative radiographs certainly do not exclude it.”

“Education of people with diabetes is a comprehensive task and involves teamwork by a team that comprises at least a nurse educator, a dietician, and a physician. It is, however, essential that individuals with diabetes assume an active role in their care themselves, since appropriate self-care behavior is the cornerstone of the treatment of diabetes.” (for much more on these topics, see Simmons et al.)

“The International Diabetes Federation estimates that more than 245 million people around the world have diabetes (4). This total is expected to rise to 380 million within 20 years. Each year a further 7 million people develop diabetes. Diabetes, mostly type 2 diabetes (T2D), now affects 5.9% of the world’s adult population with almost 80% of the total in developing countries. […] According to […] 2007 prevalence data […] [a]lmost 25% of the population aged 60 years and older had diabetes in 2007. […] It has been projected that one in three Americans born in 2000 will develop diabetes, with the highest estimated lifetime risk among Latinos (males, 45.4% and females, 52.5%) (6). A rise in obesity rates is to blame for much of the increase in T2D (7). Nearly two-thirds of American adults are overweight or obese (8). [my bold, US]

“In the natural history of progression to diabetes, β-cells initially increase insulin secretion in response to insulin resistance and, for a period of time, are able to effectively maintain glucose levels below the diabetic range. However, when β-cell function begins to decline, insulin production is inadequate to overcome the insulin resistance, and blood glucose levels rise. […] Insulin resistance, once established, remains relatively stable over time. […] progression of T2D is a result of worsening β-cell function with pre-existing insulin resistance.”

“Lifestyle modification (i.e., weight loss through diet and increased physical activity) has proven effective in reducing incident T2D in high-risk groups. The Da Qing Study (China) randomly allocated 33 clinics (557 persons with IGT) to 1 of 4 study conditions: control, diet, exercise, or diet plus exercise (23). Compared with the control group, the incidence of diabetes was reduced in the three intervention groups by 31, 46, and 42%, respectively […] The Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study evaluated 522 obese persons with IGT randomly allocated on an individual basis to a control group or a lifestyle intervention group […] During the trial, the incidence of diabetes was reduced by 58% in the lifestyle group compared with the control group. The US Diabetes Prevention Program is the largest trial of primary prevention of diabetes to date and was conducted at 27 clinical centers with 3,234 overweight and obese participants with IGT randomly allocated to 1 of 3 study conditions: control, use of metformin, or intensive lifestyle intervention […] Over 3 years, the incidence of diabetes was reduced by 31% in the metformin group and by 58% in the lifestyle group; the latter value is identical to that observed in the Finnish Study. […] Metformin is recommended as first choice for pharmacologic treatment [of type 2 diabetes] and has good efficacy to lower HbA1c […] However, most patients will eventually require treatment with combinations of oral medications with different mechanisms of action simultaneously in order to attain adequate glycemic control.”

CVD [cardiovascular disease, US] is the cause of 65% of deaths in patients with T2D (31). Epidemiologic studies have shown that the risk of a myocardial infarction (MI) or CVD death in a diabetic individual with no prior history of CVD is comparable to that of an individual who has had a previous MI (32, 33). […] Stroke is the second leading cause of long-term disability in high-income countries and the second leading cause of death worldwide. […] Stroke incidence is highly age-dependent. The median stroke incidence in persons between 15 and 49 years of age is 10 per 100,000 per year, whereas this is 2,000 per 100,000 for persons aged 85 years or older. […] In Western communities, about 80% of strokes are caused by focal cerebral ischemia, secondary to arterial occlusion, 15% by intracerebral hemorrhage, and 5% by subarachnoid hemorrhage (2). […] Patients with ischemic stroke usually present with focal neurological deficit of sudden onset. […] Common deficits include dysphasia, dysarthria, hemianopia, weakness, ataxia, sensory loss, and cognitive disorders such as spatial neglect […] Mild-to-moderate headache is an accompanying symptom in about a quarter of all patients with ischemic stroke […] The risk of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage after thrombolysis is higher with more severe strokes and higher age (21). [worth keeping in mind when in the ‘I-am-angry-and-need-someone-to-blame-for-the-death-of-individual-X-phase’ – if the individual died as a result of the treatment, the prognosis was probably never very good to start with..] […] Thirty-day case fatality rates for ischemic stroke in Western communities generally range between 10 and 17% (2). Stroke outcome strongly depends not only on age and comorbidity, but also on the type and cause of the infarct. Early case fatality can be as low as 2.5% in patients with lacunar infarcts (7) and as high as 78% in patients with space-occupying hemispheric infarction (8).”

“In the previous 20 years, ten thousands of patients with acute ischemic stroke have participated in hundreds of clinical trials of putative neuroprotective therapies. Despite this enormous effort, there is no evidence of benefit of a single neuroprotective agent in humans, whereas over 500 have been effective in animal models […] the failure of neuroprotective agents in the clinic may […] be explained by the fact that most neuroprotectants inhibit only a single step in the broad cascade of events that lead to cell death (9). Currently, there is no rationale for the use of any neuroprotective medication in patients with acute ischemic stroke.”

“Between 5 and 10% of patients with ischemic stroke suffer from epileptic seizures in the first week and about 3% within the first 24 h […] Post-stroke seizures are not associated with a higher mortality […] About 1 out of every 11 patient with an early epileptic seizure develops epilepsy within 10 years after stroke onset (51) […] In the first 12 h after stroke onset, plasma glucose concentrations are elevated in up to 68% of patients, of whom more than half are not known to have diabetes mellitus (53). An initially high blood glucose concentration in patients with acute stroke is a predictor of poor outcome (53, 54). […] Acute stroke is associated with a blood pressure higher than 170/110 mmHg in about two thirds of patients. Blood pressure falls spontaneously in the majority of patients during the first week after stroke. High blood pressure during the acute phase of stroke has been associated with a poor outcome (56). It is unclear how blood pressure should be managed during the acute phase of ischemic stroke. […] routine lowering of the blood pressure is not recommended in the first week after stroke, except for extremely elevated values on repeated measurements […] Urinary incontinence affects up to 60% of stroke patients admitted to hospital, with 25% still having problems on hospital discharge, and around 15% remaining incontinent at 1 year. […] Between 22 and 43% of patients develop fever or subfebrile temperatures during the first days after stroke […] High body temperature in the first days after stroke is associated with poor outcome (42, 67). There is currently no evidence from randomized trials to support the routine lowering of body temperature above 37◦C.”

December 28, 2016 Posted by | Books, Cardiology, Diabetes, Epidemiology, Immunology, Medicine, Neurology, Ophthalmology | Leave a comment

The Ageing Immune System and Health (I)

as we age, we observe a greater heterogeneity of ability and health. The variation in, say, walking speed is far greater in a group of 70 year olds, than in a group on 20 year olds. This makes the study of ageing and the factors driving that heterogeneity of health and functional ability in old age vital. […] The study of the immune system across the lifespan has demonstrated that as we age the immune system undergoes a decline in function, termed immunosenescence. […] the decline in function is not universal across all aspects of the immune system, and neither is the magnitude of functional loss similar between individuals. The theory of inflammageing, which represents a chronic low grade inflammatory state in older people, has been described as a major consequence of immunosenescence, though lifestyle factors such as reduced physical activity and increased adiposity also play a major role […] In poor health, older people accumulate disease, described as multimorbidity. This in turn means traditional single system based health care becomes less valid as each system affected by disease impacts on other systems. This leads some older people to be at greater risk of adverse events such as disability and death. The syndrome of this increased vulnerability is described as frailty, and increasing fundamental evidence is emerging that suggests immunosenescence and inflammageing may underpin frailty […] Thus frailty is seen as one clinical manifestation of immunosenescence.”

The above quotes are from the book‘s preface. I gave it 3 stars on goodreads. I should probably, considering that this topic is mentioned in the preface, mention explicitly that the book doesn’t actually go into a lot of details about the downsides of ‘traditional single system based health care’; the book is mainly about immunology and related topics, and although it provides coverage of intervention studies etc., it doesn’t really provide detailed coverage about issues like the optimization of organizational structures/systems analysis etc.. The book I was currently reading while I started out writing this post – Integrated Diabetes Care – A Multidisciplinary Approach (blog coverage here) – is incidentally pretty much exclusively devoted to providing coverage of these sorts of topics (and it did a fine job).

If you have never read any sort of immunology text before the book will probably be unreadable to you – “It is aimed at fundamental scientists and clinicians with an interest in ageing or the immune system.” In my coverage below I have not made any efforts towards picking out quotes which would be particularly easy for the average reader to read and understand; this is another way of saying that the post is mainly written for my own benefit, perhaps even more so than is usually the case, not for the benefit of potential readers reading along here.

“Physiological ageing is associated with significant re-modelling of the immune system. Termed immunosenescence, age-related changes have been described in the composition, phenotype and function of both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. […] Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocyte in circulation […] The first step in neutrophil anti-microbial defence is their extravasation from the bloodstream and migration to the site of infection. Whilst age appears to have no effect upon the speed at which neutrophils migrate towards chemotactic signals in vitro [15], the directional accuracy of neutrophil migration to inflammatory agonists […] as well as bacterial peptides […] is significantly reduced [15]. […] neutrophils from older adults clearly exhibit defects in several key defensive mechanisms, namely chemotaxis […], phagocytosis of opsonised pathogens […] and NET formation […]. Given this near global impairment in neutrophil function, alterations to a generic signalling element rather than defects in molecules specific to each anti-microbial defence strategy is likely to explain the aberrations in neutrophil function that occur with age. In support of this idea, ageing in rodents is associated with a significant increase in neutrophil membrane fluidity, which coincides with a marked reduction in neutrophil function […] ageing results in a reduction in NK cell production and proliferation […] Numerous studies have examined the impact of age […], with the general consensus that at the single cell level, NK cell cytotoxicity (NKCC) is reduced with age […] retrospective and prospective studies have reported relationships between low NK cell activity in older adults and (1) a past history of severe infection, (2) an increased risk of future infection, (3) a reduced probability of surviving infectious episodes and (4) infectious morbidity [49–51]. Related to this increased risk of infection, reduced NKCC prior to and following influenza vaccination in older adults has been shown to be associated with reduced protective anti-hemagglutinin titres, worsened health status and an increased incidence of respiratory tract infection […] Whilst age has no effect upon the frequency or absolute number of monocytes [54, 55], the composition of the monocyte pool is markedly different in older adults, who present with an increased frequency of non-classical and intermediate monocytes, and fewer classical monocytes when compared to their younger counterparts”.

“Via their secretion of growth factors, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and proteases, senescent cells compromise tissue homeostasis and function, and their presence has been causally implicated in the development of such age-associated conditions as sarcopenia and cataracts [92]. Several studies have demonstrated a role for innate immune cells in the recognition and clearance of senescent cells […] ageing is associated with a low-grade systemic up-regulation of circulating inflammatory mediators […] Results from longitudinal-based studies suggest inflammageing is deleterious to human health with studies in older cohorts demonstrating that low-grade increases in the circulating levels of TNF-α [103], IL-6 […] and CRP [105] are associated with both all-cause […] and cause-specific […] mortality. Furthermore, inflammageing is a predictor of frailty [106] and is considered a major factor in the development of several age-related pathologies, such as atherosclerosis [107], Alzheimer’s disease [100] and sarcopenia [108].”

“Persistent viral infections, reduced vaccination responses, increased autoimmunity, and a rise in inflammatory syndromes all typify immune ageing. […] These changes can be in part attributed to the accumulation of highly differentiated senescent T cells, characterised by their decreased proliferative capacity and the activation of senescence signaling pathways, together with alterations in the functional competence of regulatory cells, allowing inflammation to go unchecked. […] Immune senescence results from defects in different leukocyte populations, however the dysfunction is most profound in T cells [6, 7]. The responses of T cells from aged individuals are typically slower and of a lower magnitude than those of young individuals […] while not all equally affected by age, the overall T cell number does decline dramatically as a result of thymic atrophy […] T cell differentiation is a highly complex process controlled not only by costimulation but also by the strength and duration of T cell receptor (TCR) signalling [34]. Nearly all TCR signalling pathways have been found altered during ageing […] two phenotypically distinct subsets of B cells […] have been demonstrated to exert immunosuppressive functions. The frequency and function of both these Breg subsets declines with age”.

“The immune impairments in patients with chronic hyperglycemia resemble those seen during ageing, namely poor control of infections and reduced vaccination response [99].” [This is hardly surprising. ‘Hyperglycemia -> accelerated ageing’ seems generally to be a good (over-)simplified model in many contexts. To give another illustrative example from Czernik & Fowlkes text, “approximately 4–6 years of diabetes exposure in some children may be sufficient to increase skin AGEs to levels that would naturally accumulate only after ~25 years of chronological aging”].

“The term “immunosenescence” is commonly taken to mean age-associated changes in immune parameters hypothesized to contribute to increased susceptibility and severity of the older adult to infectious disease, autoimmunity and cancer. In humans, it is characterized by lower numbers and frequencies of naïve T and B cells and higher numbers and frequencies of late-differentiated T cells, especially CD8+ T cells, in the peripheral blood. […] Low numbers of naïve cells render the aged highly susceptible to pathogens to which they have not been previously exposed, but are not otherwise associated with an “immune risk profile” predicting earlier mortality. […] many of the changes, or most often, differences, in immune parameters of the older adult relative to the young have not actually been shown to be detrimental. The realization that compensatory changes may be developing over time is gaining ground […] Several studies have now shown that lower percentages and absolute numbers of naïve CD8+ T cells are seen in all older subjects whereas the accumulation of very large numbers of CD8+ late-stage differentiated memory cells is seen in a majority but not in all older adults [2]. The major difference between this majority of subjects with such accumulations of memory cells and those without is that the former are infected with human herpesvirus 5 (Cytomegalovirus, CMV). Nevertheless, the question of whether CMV is associated with immunosenescence remains so far uncertain as no causal relationship has been unequivocally established [5]. Because changes are seen rapidly after primary infection in transplant patients [6] and infants [7], it is highly likely that CMV does drive the accumulation of CD8+ late-stage memory cells, but the relationship of this to senescence remains unclear. […] In CMV-seropositive people, especially older people, a remarkably high fraction of circulating CD8+ T lymphocytes is often found to be specific for CMV. However, although the proportion of naïve CD8+ T cells is lower in the old than the young whether or not they are CMV-infected, the gross accumulation of late-stage differentiated CD8+ T cells only occurs in CMV-seropositive individuals […] It is not clear whether this is adaptive or pathological […] The total CMV-specific T-cell response in seropositive subjects constitutes on average approximately 10 % of both the CD4+ and CD8+ memory compartments, and can be far greater in older people. […] there are some published data suggesting that that in young humans or young mice, CMV may improve immune responses to some antigens and to influenza virus, probably by way of increased pro-inflammatory responses […] observations suggest that the effect of CMV on the immune system may be highly dependent also on an individuals’ age and circumstances, and that what is viewed as ageing is in fact later collateral damage from immune reactivity that was beneficial in earlier life [47, 48]. This is saying nothing more than that the same immune pathology that always accompanies immune responses to acute viruses is also caused by CMV, but over a chronic time scale and usually subclinical. […] data suggest that the remodeling of the T-cell compartment in the presence of a latent infection with CMV represents a crucial adaptation of the immune system towards the chronic challenge of lifelong CMV.”

The authors take issue with using the term ‘senescence’ to describe some of the changes discussed above, because this term by definition should be employed only in the context of changes that are demonstrably deleterious to health. It should be kept in mind in this context that insufficient immunological protection against CMV in old age could easily be much worse than the secondary inflammatory effects, harmful though these may well be; CMV in the context of AIDS, organ transplantation (“CMV is the most common and single most important viral infection in solid organ transplant recipients” – medscape) and other disease states involving compromised immune systems can be really bad news (“Disease caused by human herpesviruses tends to be relatively mild and self-limited in immunocompetent persons, although severe and quite unusual disease can be seen with immunosuppression.” Holmes et al.)

“The role of CMV in the etiology of […] age-associated diseases is currently under intensive investigation […] in one powerful study, the impact of CMV infection on mortality was investigated in a cohort of 511 individuals aged at least 65 years at entry, who were then followed up for 18 years. Infection with CMV was associated with an increased mortality rate in healthy older individuals due to an excess of vascular deaths. It was estimated that those elderly who were CMV- seropositive at the beginning of the study had a near 4-year reduction in lifespan compared to those who were CMV-seronegative, a striking result with major implications for public health [59]. Other data, such as those from the large US NHANES-III survey, have shown that CMV seropositivity together with higher than median levels of the inflammatory marker CRP correlate with a significantly lower 10-year survival rate of individuals who were mostly middle-aged at the start of the study [63]. Further evidence comes from a recently published Newcastle 85+ study of the immune parameters of 751 octogenarians investigated for their power to predict survival during a 65-month follow-up. It was documented that CMV-seropositivity was associated with increased 6-year cardiovascular mortality or death from stroke and myocardial infarction. It was therefore concluded that CMV-seropositivity is linked to a higher incidence of coronary heart disease in octogenarians and that senescence in both the CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell compartments is a predictor of overall cardiovascular mortality”.

“The incidence and severity of many infections are increased in older adults. Influenza causes approximately 36,000 deaths and more than 100,000 hospitalizations in the USA every year […] Vaccine uptake differs tremendously between European countries with more than 70 % of the older population being vaccinated against influenza in The Netherlands and the United Kingdom, but below 10 % in Poland, Latvia and Estonia during the 2012–2013 season […] several systematic reviews and meta-analyses have estimated the clinical efficacy and/or effectiveness of a given influenza vaccine, taking into consideration not only randomized trials, but also cohort and case-control studies. It can be concluded that protection is lower in the old than in young adults […] [in one study including “[m]ore than 84,000 pneumococcal vaccine-naïve persons above 65 years of age”] the effect of age on vaccine efficacy was studied and the statistical model showed a decline of vaccine efficacy for vaccine-type CAP and IPD [Invasive Pneumococcal Disease] from 65 % (95 % CI 38–81) in 65-year old subjects, to 40 % (95 % CI 17–56) in 75-year old subjects […] The most effective measure to prevent infectious disease is vaccination. […] Over the last 20–30 years tremendous progress has been achieved in developing novel/improved vaccines for children, but a lot of work still needs to be done to optimize vaccines for the elderly.”

December 12, 2016 Posted by | Books, Cardiology, Diabetes, Epidemiology, Immunology, Infectious disease, Medicine, Microbiology | Leave a comment

Role of Biomarkers in Medicine

“The use of biomarkers in basic and clinical research has become routine in many areas of medicine. They are accepted as molecular signatures that have been well characterized and repeatedly shown to be capable of predicting relevant disease states or clinical outcomes. In Role of Biomarkers in Medicine, expert researchers in their individual field have reviewed many biomarkers or potential biomarkers in various types of diseases. The topics address numerous aspects of medicine, demonstrating the current conceptual status of biomarkers as clinical tools and as surrogate endpoints in clinical research.”

The above quote is from the preface of the book. Here’s my goodreads review. I have read about biomarkers before – for previous posts on this topic, see this link. I added the link in part because the coverage provided in this book is in my opinion generally of a somewhat lower quality than is the coverage that has been provided in some of the other books I’ve read on these topics. However the fact that the book is not amazing should probably not keep me from sharing some observations of interest from the book, which I have done in this post.

we suggest more precise studies to establish the exact role of this hormone […] additional studies are necessary […] there are conflicting results […] require further investigation […] more intervention studies with long-term follow-up are required. […] further studies need to be conducted […] further research is needed (There are a lot of comments like these in the book, I figured I should include a few in my coverage…)

“Cancer biomarkers (CB) are biomolecules produced either by the tumor cells or by other cells of the body in response to the tumor, and CB could be used as screening/early detection tool of cancer, diagnostic, prognostic, or predictor for the overall outcome of a patient. Moreover, cancer biomarkers may identify subpopulations of patients who are most likely to respond to a given therapy […] Unfortunately, […] only very few CB have been approved by the FDA as diagnostic or prognostic cancer markers […] 25 years ago, the clinical usefulness of CB was limited to be an effective tool for patient’s prognosis, surveillance, and therapy monitoring. […] CB have [since] been reported to be used also for screening of general population or risk groups, for differential diagnosis, and for clinical staging or stratification of cancer patients. Additionally, CB are used to estimate tumor burden and to substitute for a clinical endpoint and/or to measure clinical benefit, harm or lack of benefit, or harm [4, 18, 30]. Among commonly utilized biomarkers in clinical practice are PSA, AFP, CA125, and CEA.”

“Bladder cancer (BC) is the second most common malignancy in the urologic field. Preoperative predictive biomarkers of cancer progression and prognosis are imperative for optimizing […] treatment for patients with BC. […] Approximately 75–85% of BC cases are diagnosed as nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) […] NMIBC has a tendency to recur (50–70%) and may progress (10–20%) to a higher grade and/or muscle-invasive BC (MIBC) in time, which can lead to high cancer-specific mortality [2]. Histological tumor grade is one of the clinical factors associated with outcomes of patients with NMIBC. High-grade NMIBC generally exhibits more aggressive behavior than low-grade NMIBC, and it increases the risk of a poorer prognosis […] Cystoscopy and urine cytology are commonly used techniques for the diagnosis and surveillance of BC. Cystoscopy can identify […] most papillary and solid lesions, but this is highly invasive […] urine cytology is limited by examiner experience and low sensitivity. For these reasons, some tumor markers have been investigated […], but their sensitivity and specificity are limited [5] and they are unable to predict the clinical outcome of BC patients. […] Numerous efforts have been made to identify tumor markers. […] However, a serum marker that can serve as a reliable detection marker for BC has yet to be identified.”

“Endometrial cancer (EmCa) is the most common type of gynecological cancer. EmCa is the fourth most common cancer in the United States, which has been linked to increased incidence of obesity. […] there are no reliable biomarker tests for early detection of EmCa and treatment effectiveness. […] Approximately 75% of women with EmCa are postmenopausal; the most common symptom is postmenopausal bleeding […] Approximately 15% of women diagnosed with EmCa are younger than 50 years of age, while 5% are diagnosed before the age of 40 [29]. […] Roughly, half of the EmCa cases are linked to obesity. Obese women are four times more likely to develop EmCa when compared to normal weight women […] Obese individuals oftentimes exhibit resistance to leptin and show high levels of the adipokine in blood, which is known as leptin resistance […] prolonged exposure of leptin damages the hypothalamus causing it to become insensitive to the effects of leptin […] Evidence shows that leptin is an important pro-inflammatory, pro-angiogenic, and mitogenic factor for cancer. Leptin produced by cancer cells acts in an autocrine and paracrine manner to promote tumor cell proliferation, migration and invasion, pro-inflammation, and angiogenesis [58, 70]. High levels of leptin […] are associated with metastasis and decreased survival rates in breast cancer patients [58]. […] Metabolic syndrome including obesity, hypertension, insulin resistance, diabetes, and dyslipidemia increase the risk of developing multiple malignancies, particularly EmCa [30]. Younger women diagnosed with EmCa are usually obese, and their carcinomas show a well-differentiated histology [20].

“Normally, tumor suppressor genes act to inhibit or arrest cell proliferation and tumor development [37]. However; when mutated, tumor suppressors become inactive, thus permitting tumor growth. For example, mutations in p53 have been determined in various cancers such as breast, colon, lung, endometrium, leukemias, and carcinomas of many tissues. These p53 mutations are found in approximately 50% of all cancers [38]. Roughly 10–20% of endometrial carcinomas exhibit p53 mutations [37]. […] overexpression of mutated tumor suppressor p53 has been associated with Type II EmCa (poor histologic grade, non-endometrioid histology, advanced stage, and poor survival).”

“Increasing data indicate that oxidative stress is involved in the development of DR [diabetic retinopathy] [16–19]. The retina has a high content of polyunsaturated fatty acids and has the highest oxygen uptake and glucose oxidation relative to any other tissue. This phenomenon renders the retina more susceptible to oxidative stress [20]. […] Since long-term exposure to oxidative stress is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications, polymorphic genes of detoxifying enzymes may be involved in the development of DR. […] A meta-analysis comprising 17 studies, including type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients from different ethnic origins, implied that the C (Ala) allele of the C47T polymorphism in the MnSOD gene had a significant protective effect against microvascular complications (DR and diabetic nephropathy) […] In the development of DR, superoxide levels are elevated in the retina, antioxidant defense system is compromised, MnSOD is inhibited, and mitochondria are swollen and dysfunctional [77,87–90]. Overexpression of MnSOD protects [against] diabetes-induced mitochondrial damage and the development of DR [19,91].”

Continuous high level of blood glucose in diabetes damages micro and macro blood vessels throughout the body by altering the endothelial cell lining of the blood vessels […] Diabetes threatens vision, and patients with diabetes develop cataracts at an earlier age and are nearly twice as likely to get glaucoma compared to non-diabetic[s] [3]. More than 75% of patients who have had diabetes mellitus for more than 20 years will develop diabetic retinopathy (DR) [4]. […] DR is a slow progressive retinal disease and occurs as a consequence of longstanding accumulated functional and structural impairment of the retina by diabetes. It is a multifactorial condition arising from the complex interplay between biochemical and metabolic abnormalities occurring in all cells of the retina. DR has been classically regarded as a microangiopathy of the retina, involving changes in the vascular wall leading to capillary occlusion and thereby retinal ischemia and leakage. And more recently, the neural defects in the retina are also being appreciated […]. Recently, various clinical investigators [have detected] neuronal dysfunction at very early stages of diabetes and numerous abnormalities in the retina can be identified even before the vascular pathology appears [76, 77], thus suggesting a direct effect of diabetes on the neural retina. […] An emerging issue in DR research is the focus on the mechanistic link between chronic low-grade inflammation and angiogenesis. Recent evidence has revealed that extracellular high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) protein acts as a potent proinflammatory cytokine that triggers inflammation and recruits leukocytes to the site of tissue damage, and exhibits angiogenic effects. The expression of HMGB1 is upregulated in epiretinal membranes and vitreous fluid from patients with proliferative DR and in the diabetic retina. […] HMGB1 may be a potential biomarker [for diabetic retinopathy] […] early blockade of HMGB1 may be an effective strategy to prevent the progression of DR.”

“High blood pressure is one of the leading risk factors for global mortality and is estimated to have caused 9.4 million deaths in 2010. A meta‐analysis which includes 1 million individuals has indicated that death from both CHD [coronary heart disease] and stroke increase progressively and linearly from BP levels as low as 115 mmHg systolic and 75 mmHg diastolic upwards [138]. The WHO [has] pointed out that a “reduction in systolic blood pressure of 10 mmHg is associated with a 22% reduction in coronary heart disease, 41% reduction in stroke in randomized trials, and a 41–46% reduction in cardiometabolic mortality in epidemiological studies” [139].”

Several reproducible studies have ascertained that individuals with autism demonstrate an abnormal brain 5-HT system […] peripheral alterations in the 5-HT system may be an important marker of central abnormalities in autism. […] In a recent study, Carminati et al. [129] tested the therapeutic efficacy of venlafaxine, an antidepressant drug that inhibits the reuptake of 5-HT, and [found] that venlafaxine at a low dose [resulted in] a substantial improvement in repetitive behaviors, restricted interests, social impairment, communication, and language. Venlafaxine probably acts via serotonergic mechanisms  […] OT [Oxytocin]-related studies in autism have repeatedly reported lower blood OT level in autistic patients compared to age- and gender-matched control subjects […] autistic patients demonstrate an altered neuroinflammatory response throughout their lives; they also show increased astrocyte and microglia inflammatory response in the cortex and the cerebellum  [47, 48].”

November 3, 2016 Posted by | autism, Books, Cancer/oncology, Cardiology, Diabetes, Epidemiology, Genetics, Immunology, Medicine, Neurology, Ophthalmology, Pharmacology | Leave a comment

Respirology

I was debating whether to blog this book at all, as it’s neither very long nor very good, but I decided it was worth adding a few observations from the book here. You can read my goodreads review of the publication here. Whenever quotes look a bit funny in the coverage below (i.e. when you see things like words in brackets or strangely located ‘[…]’, assume that the reason for this is that I tried to improve upon the occasionally frankly horrible language of some of the contributors to the publication. If you want to know exactly what they wrote, rather than what they presumably meant to write (basic grammar errors due to the authors having trouble with the English language are everywhere in this publication, and although I did choose to do so here I do feel a bit uncomfortable quoting a publication like this one verbatim on my blog), read the book.

I went off on a tangent towards the end of the post and I ended up adding some general remarks about medical cost, insurance and various other topics. So the post may have something of interest even to people who may not be highly interested in any of the stuff covered in the book itself.

“Despite intensive recommendations, [the] influenza vaccination rate in medical staff in Poland ranges from about 20 % in physicians to 10 % in nurses. […] It has been demonstrated that vaccination of health care workers against influenza significantly decreases mortality of elderly people remaining under [long-term care]. […] Vaccinating health care workers also substantially reduces sickness absenteeism, especially in emergency units […] Concerning physicians, vaccination avoidance stemmed from the lack of knowledge of protective value of vaccine (33 %), lack of time to get vaccinated (29 %), and Laziness (24 %). In nurses, these figures amounted to 55 %, 12 %, and 5 %, respectively (Zielonka et al. 2009).”

I just loved the fact that ‘laziness’ was included here as an explanatory variable, but on the other hand the fact that one-third of doctors cited lack of knowledge about the protective value of vaccination as a reason for not getting vaccinated is … well, let’s use the word ‘interesting’. But it gets even better:

“The questions asked and opinions expressed by physicians or nurses on vaccinations showed that their knowledge in this area was far from the current evidence-based medicine recommendations. Nurses, in particular, commonly presented opinions similar to those which can be found in anti-vaccination movements and forums […] The attitude of physicians toward influenza vaccination vary greatly. In many a ward, a majority of physicians were vaccinated (70–80 %). However, in the neurology and intensive care units the proportion of vaccinated physicians amounted only to 20 %. The reason for such a small yield […] was a critical opinion about the effectiveness and safety of vaccination. Similar differences, depending on medical specialty, were observed in Germany (4–71% of vaccines) (Roggendorf et al. 2011) […] It is difficult to explain the fear of influenza vaccination among the staff of intensive care units, since these are exactly the units where many patients with most severe cases of influenza are admitted and often die (Ayscue et al. 2014). In this group of health care workers, high efficiency of influenza vaccination has been clearly demonstrated […] In the present study a strong difference between the proportion of vaccinated physicians (55 %) and nurses (21 %) was demonstrated, which is in line with some data coming from other countries. In the US, 69 % of physicians and 46 % of nurses get a vaccine shot […] and in Germany the respective percentages are 39 % and 17 % […] In China, 21 % of nurses and only 13 % of physicians are vaccinated against influenza (Seale et al. 2010a), and in [South] Korea, 91 % and 68 % respectively (Lee et al. 2008).”

“[A] survey was conducted among Polish (243) and foreign (80) medical students at the Pomeranian Medical University in Szczecin, Poland. […] The survey results reveal that about 40 % of students were regular or occasional smoker[s]. […] 60 % of students declared themselves to be non-smokers, 20 % were occasional smokers, and 20 % were regular smokers”

40 % of medical students in a rather large sample turned out to be smokers. Wow. Yeah, I hadn’t seen that one coming. I’d probably expect a few alcoholics and I would probably not have been surprised about a hypothetical higher-than-average alcohol consumption in a sample like that (they don’t talk about alcohol so I don’t have data on this, I’m just saying I wouldn’t be surprised – after all I do know that doctors are high-risk for suicide), but such a large proportion smoking? That’s unexpected. It probably shouldn’t have been, considering that this is very much in line with the coverage included in Thirlaway & Upton’s book. I include some remarks about their coverage about smoking in my third post about the book here. The important observation of note from that part of the book’s coverage is probably that most smokers want to quit and yet very few manage to actually do it. “Although the majority of smokers want to stop smoking and predict that they will have stopped in twelve months, only 2–3 per cent actually stops permanently a year (Taylor et al. 2006).” If those future Polish doctors know that smoking is bad for them, but they assume that they can just ‘stop in time’ when ‘the time’ comes – well, some of those people are probably in for a nasty surprise (and they should have studied some more, so that they’d known this?).

A prospective study of middle-aged British men […] revealed that the self-assessment of health status was strongly associated with mortality. Men who reported poor health had an eight-fold increase in total mortality compared with those reporting excellent health. Those who assessed their health as poor were manual workers, cigarette smokers, and often heavy drinkers. Half of those with poor health suffered from chest pain on exertion and other chronic diseases. Thus, self-assessment of health status appears to be a good measure of current physical health and risk of death“.

It is estimated that globally 3.1 million people die each year due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). According to the World Health Organization (WHO 2014), the disease was the third leading cause of death worldwide in 2012. [In the next chapter of the book they state that: “COPD is currently the fourth leading cause of death among adult patients globally, and it is projected that it will be the third most common cause of death by 2020.” Whether it’s the third or fourth most common cause of death, it definitely kills a lot of people…] […] Approximately 40–50 % of lifelong smokers will go on to develop COPD […] the number of patients with a primary diagnosis of COPD […] constitutes […] 1.33 % of the total population of Poland. This result is consistent with that obtained during the Polish Spirometry Day in 2011 (Dabrowiecki et al. 2013) when 1.1 % of respondents declared having had a diagnosed COPD, while pulmonary function tests showed objectively the presence of obstruction in 12.3 % of patients.”

Based on numbers like these I feel tempted to conclude that the lungs may be yet another organ in which a substantial proportion of people of advanced age experience low-level organ dysfunction arguably not severe enough to lead to medical intervention. The kidneys are similar, as I also noted when I covered Longmore et al.‘s text.

“Generally, the costs of treatment of patients with COPD are highly variable […] estimates suggest […] that the costs of treatment of moderate stages of COPD may be 3–4-fold higher in comparison with the mild form of the disease, and in the severe form they reach up to 6–10 times the basic cost […] every second person with COPD is of working age […] Admission rates for COPD patients differ as much as 10-fold between European countries (European Lung White Book 2013).”

“In the EU, the costs of respiratory diseases are estimated at 6 % of the budget allocated to health care. Of this amount, 56 % is allocated for the treatment of COPD patients. […] Studies show that one per ten Poles over 30 year of age have COPD symptoms. Each year, around 4 % of all hospitalizations are due to COPD. […] One of the most important parameters regarding pharmacoeconomics is the hospitalization rate […] a high number of hospitalizations due to COPD exacerbations in Poland dramatically increase direct medical costs.”

I bolded the quote above because I knew this but had never seen it stated quite as clearly as it’s stated here, and I may be tempted to quote that one later on. Hospitalizations are often really expensive compared to drugs people who are not hospitalized take for their various health conditions, for example you can probably buy a year’s worth of anti-diabetic drugs, or more, for the costs of just one hospital admission due to drug mis-dosing. Before you get the idea that this might have ‘obvious implications’ for how ‘one’ should structure medical insurance arrangements in terms of copay structures etc., do however keep in mind that the picture here is really confusing:

3-3

Here’s the link, with more details – the key observation is that: “There is no consistency […] in the direction of change in costs resulting from changes in compliance”. That’s not diabetes, that’s ‘stuff in general’.

It would be neat if you could e.g. tell a story about how high costs of a drug always lead to non-compliance, which lead to increased hospitalization rates, which lead to higher costs than if the drugs had been subsidized. That would be a very strong case for subsidization. Or it would be neat if you could say that it doesn’t matter whether you subsidize a drug or not, because the costs of drugs are irrelevant in terms of usage patterns – people are told to take one pill every day by their doctor, and by golly that’s what they’re doing, regardless of what those pills cost. I know someone personally who wrote a PhD thesis about a drug where that clearly wasn’t the case, and the price elasticity was supposed to be ‘theoretically low’ in that case, so that one’s obviously out ‘in general’, but the point is that people have looked at this stuff, a lot. I’m assuming you might be able to spot a dynamic like this in some situations, and different dynamics in the case of other drugs. It gets even better when you include complicating phenomena like cost-switching; perhaps the guy/organization responsible for potentially subsidizing the drug is not the same guy(/-…) as the guy who’s supposed to pay for the medical admissions (this depends on the insurance structure/setup). But that’s not always the case, and the decision as to who pays for what is not necessarily a given; it may depend e.g. on health care provider preferences, and those preferences may themselves depend upon a lot of things unrelated to patient preferences or -incentives. A big question even in the relatively simple situation where the financial structure is – for these purposes at least – simple, is also the extent to which relevant costs are even measured, and/or how they’re measured (if a guy dies due to a binding budget constraint resulting in no treatment for a health condition that would have been treatable with a drug, is that outcome supposed to be ‘very cheap’ (he didn’t pay anything for  drugs, so there were no medical outlays) or very expensive (he could have worked for another two decades if he’d been treated, and those productivity losses need to be included in the calculation somehow; to focus solely on medical outlays is thus to miss the point)? An important analytical point here is that if you don’t explicitly make those deaths/productivity losses expensive, they are going to look very cheap, because the default option will always be to have them go unrecorded and untallied.

A problem not discussed in the coverage was incidentally the extent to which survey results pertaining to the cost of vaccination are worth much. You ask doctors why they didn’t get vaccinated, and they tell you it’s because it’s too expensive. Well, how many of them would you have expected to tell you they did not get vaccinated because the vaccines were too cheap? This is more about providing people with a perceived socially acceptable out than it is about finding stuff out about their actual reasons for behaving the way they do. If the price of vaccination does not vary across communities it’s difficult to estimate the price elasticity, true (if it does, you probably got an elasticity estimate right there), but using survey information to implicitly assess the extent to which the price is too high? Allow the vaccination price to vary next year/change it/etc. (or even simpler/cheaper, if those data exist; look at price variation which happened in the past and observe how the demand varied), and see if/how the doctors and nurses respond. That’s how you do this, you don’t ask people. Asking people is also actually sort of risky; I’m pretty sure a smart doctor could make an argument that if you want doctors to get vaccinated you should pay them for getting the shot – after all, getting vaccinated is unpleasant, and as mentioned there are positive externalities here in terms of improved patient outcomes, which might translate into specific patients not dying, which is probably a big deal, for those patients at least. The smart doctor wouldn’t necessarily be wrong; if the price of vaccination was ‘sufficiently low’, i.e. a ‘large’ negative number (‘if you get vaccinated, we give you $10.000’), I’m pretty sure coverage rates would go up a lot. That doesn’t make it a good idea. (Or a bad idea per se, for that matter – it depends upon the shape of the implicit social welfare function we’re playing around with. Though I must add – so that any smart doctors potentially reading along here don’t get any ideas – that a ‘large’ negative price of vaccination for health care workers is a bad idea if a cheaper option which achieves the same outcome is potentially available to the decision makers in question, which seems highly likely to me. For example vaccination rates of medical staff would also go up a lot if regular vaccinations were made an explicit condition of their employment, the refusal of which would lead to termination of their employment… There would be implicit costs of such a scheme, in terms of staff selection effects, but if you’re comparing solely those options and you’re the guy who makes the financial decisions..?)

August 22, 2016 Posted by | Books, Economics, Health Economics, Immunology, Medicine | Leave a comment

Eating disorders (II)

You can read my first post about the book, which lead to a brief comment exchange which may be of interest to people curious about diagnostics aspects, here. The book has a lot of stuff; in this post I’ll discuss the immune system, covered in chapter 5 of the book, as well as some ways that eating disorders may affect the skin (many of the remaining chapters of the book cover this topic). This will be my last post about the book.

In chapter 5 the authors start out by noting that adequate nutrition is an important factor in terms of maintaining immunocompetence and that malnutrition increases the risk of infection. Quite a few details are known about how specific aspects of nutritional deficiencies affect specific parts of the immune system. When both energy- and protein intake is insufficient (protein-energy malnutrition, PEM) this state of affairs is associated with atrophy of immune organs such as the thymus and spleen, as well as impairments in T cell populations (likely a natural consequence of thymus atrophy – the ‘T’ in ‘T cell’ stands for thymus…). Cytokine prodution (e.g. IL-1, IL-2, interferon-γ) is down-regulated in PEM, and the ability of T cells to respond appropriately to those cytokines is decreased. Impairments in macrophage phagocytotic function and neutrophils have been observed in malnourished individuals.

The authors note in the coverage that there now “seems to be consensus accepting that, overall, the manifestations of the immunocompromised status of ED patients are less frequent and severe than in PEM [3]. In general, the immune function seems to be better preserved than would be expected, considering the highly defective nutritional status of the patients. […] [some of] the most frequent findings described are leukopenia [white blood cell deficiency] with relative lymphocytosis [increased proportion of lymphocytes in the blood], [and] thrombocytopenia [platelet deficiency] […] immunocompetence and particularly T cell subsets are useful tools to follow-up the nutritional status in patients with ED. This asseveration applies also to BN patients, since T cell subsets seem to reflect their subclinical malnutrition, which is not evident from their weight status. […] Vomiting as a purging strategy is associated with a more deleterious effect on T cells […] Complement-system proteins […] have been found decreased in AN [anorexia nervosa] and BN [bulimia nervosa] [6,79] [and] seem to depend also on white adipose tissue mass. […] These proteins might be useful in the follow-up of AN patients, since C3 and C4 falls seem to occur when treated patients resume their restricting habits increasing their risk of relapse [81].”

Despite eating disorders having significant effects on the immune system, infection risk in people with eating disorders seems surprisingly to not be elevated, at least not until an advanced stage of the disease has been reached. There are multiple explanations offered for this observation, but the answer as to why this is is not completely clear. One reason might be that people with eating disorders tend to maintain relatively high protein and vitamin intake in a manner dissimilar from the intake patterns associated with classic starvation, mediating the effects of energy deficiency. Two other reasons offered both relate to the fact that the immune system does not respond normally to pathogens, and so to the extent that symptoms relate to immune responses to infection people with eating disorders have fewer symptoms; this relates to both down-regulation of memory T-cells and suppressed capacity to mount the classic acute-phase response to infection; a reduced febrile response to bacterial infection has been observed in anorexics. In the context of muted responses to infection, the hormone leptin (‘the satiety hormone’) may also be implicated; “there is a function for leptin as an up-regulator factor of inflammatory immune responses. Moreover, leptin production is acutely increased during infection and inflammation […] an impairment in this acute increase in leptin production in AN patients might be related to the lack of infection symptoms in these patients [26].” Interestingly leptin also seems to be downregulated in BN.

Okay, let’s move on and talk a little bit about how eating disorders may affect the skin. The book has a lot of stuff about this so this will not be an exhaustive review of the material covered in the book – but I did think I ought to talk a little bit about this stuff. Skin signs are important in a diagnostic context: “As most patients with eating disorders tend to minimize or even deny their disorder, the skin changes are sometimes the only indication that the patient has an eating disorder.” Some of the skin signs described in the book relate quite directly to specific behaviours (e.g. vomiting in purging subtypes), whereas others are of a more generalized nature and are rather due to the fact that the body does not get enough energy/micronutrients/etc. to handle all the tasks it’s supposed to handle. Some skin signs are considered ‘guiding signs’ of eating disorders, in the sense that they’re signs often found in an eating disorder context but are not usually found in the differential diagnoses natural to consider in the given clinical context, so they can be used as guiding tools in a diagnostic context. Examples of guiding signs include “lanugo-like body hair [very fine, soft, and usually unpigmented, downy hair] due to starvation, Russell’s sign [calluses on the knuckles or back of the hand] and [tooth] enamel erosions due to self-induced vomiting, and self-induced dermatoses due to psychiatric comorbidity.”

Frequent skin signs in eating disorders include dry, scaly skin; orange discolouration of the skin due to excessive consumption of beta carotene (carrots); the aforementioned lanugo-like body hair; coldness of the extremities (feet, toes) and bluish/purplish colouring of the hands and feet, caused by slow circulation (acrocyanosis); hair loss; inflammation of the lips and nail changes. “With a BMI between 17.5 and 16, the skin is usually pale or yellowish and cold, but no specific signs are found.” They note in the book that “Russell sign, dental enamel erosion, and salivary gland enlargement [elsewhere in the coverage they also dub this phenomenon ‘“chipmunk” cheeks of the bulimic’] are pathognomonic of purging behavior”. Dry skin is reported in 70% of people with anorexia nervosa (-AN), and acne is reported in 47–59% of patients – these are very common symptoms/consequences of AN. The same is the case for lanugo; in one study of AN patients (n=62), 77% had lanugo. In one study, alopecia was present in 67% of bulimics (n=122) and 61% of anorexics (n=62).

Observing the hands may be important: “Strumia [1], observing the hand of the patients with anorexia nervosa (AN), noticed that many peculiar skin signs, such as xerosis, acrocyanosis, carotenoderma, evident blood vessels due to decreased subcutaneous tissue, cold hand, nail dystrophy [“Brittle nails affect approximately 30% of patients with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa”], Russell’s sign and artefacta, were located on the hands. Strumia used the term “anorectic’s hand” and suggested that, by examining the hand of a young patient, one can reasonably suspect an eating disorder. Only Russell’s sign is pathognomonic of eating disorders, but at least three signs, excluding Russell’s sign, are required for the diagnosis of “anorectic’s hand”, for example, xerosis, carotenoderma and cold hand. A perspicacious dermatologist should pay attention to this important sign when it appears in young females that show signs of reduced self-esteem and distorted perception of body weight.”

It is noted in the book that classical deficiency syndromes such as scurvy are very rare in AN because “AN is not commonly associated with vitamin deficiencies” – rather it’s the case that many anorectics over-supplement on vitamin supplements, which can paradoxically induce or worsen some skin complaints, such as e.g. xerosis (dry skin).

“the progression of anorexic pathology is accompanied by changing patterns in dietary habits [5]. These patterns include periods of low or no carbohydrate intake and an avoidance of dietary fats. They can also include patterns in which the primary foods consumed are fruits and vegetables. During this period, meat is often avoided. Changes in relative amounts of heavy to light isotopes [of nitrogen] in the hair indicate changes in the body’s metabolic state and dietary intake. […] By definition, individuals with anorexia or anorexia and bulimia are losing weight and do not get adequate nutrition. These individuals get their nitrogen largely from plants, and/or do not get sufficient nitrogen in their diet and are in nitrogen imbalance. By contrast, individuals diagnosed with only bulimia are maintaining their weight, and therefore get adequate nutrition and are likely not to be in nitrogen imbalance. […] Hatch et al. […] suggest that a distinction may be possible between anorexia and bulimia nervosa using 15N/14N and 13C/12C ratios in hair.”

“A reduced pain sensitivity has been found in eating disorder (ED) patients, but it is unclear what physiological and psychological factors are associated with this abnormality.”

January 26, 2016 Posted by | Books, Epidemiology, Immunology, Medicine | Leave a comment