Econstudentlog

Endocrinology (part 6 – neuroendocrine disorders and Paget’s disease)

I’m always uncertain as to how much content to cover when covering books like this one, and I usually cover handbooks in less detail (relatively) than I cover other books because of the amount of work it takes to cover all topics of interest – however I didn’t feel after writing my last post in the series that I had really finished with this book, in terms of blogging it; in fact I remember distinctly feeling a bit annoyed towards the end of writing my fifth post by the fact that I didn’t find that I could justify covering the detailed account of Paget’s disease included in the last part of the chapter, even though all of that stuff was new knowledge to me, and quite interesting – but these posts take some effort, and sometimes I cut them short just to at least blog something, rather than just have an unpublished draft lying around.

In this post I’ll first include some belated coverage of Paget’s disease, which is from the book’s chapter 6, and then I’ll cover some of the stuff included in chapter 8 of the book, about neuroendocrine disorders. Chapter 8 deals exclusively with various types of (usually quite rare) tumours. I decided to not cover chapter 7, which is devoted to paediatric endocrinology.

“Paget’s disease is the result of greatly local bone turnover, which occurs particularly in the elderly […] The 1° abnormality in Paget’s disease is gross overactivity of the osteoclasts, resulting in greatly increased ↑ bone resorption. This secondarily results in ↑ osteoblastic activity. The new bone is laid down in a highly disorganized manner […] Paget’s disease can affect any bone in the skeleton […] In most patients, it affects several sites, but, in about 20% of cases, a single bone is affected (monostotic disease). Typically, the disease will start in one end of a long bone and spread along the bone at a rate of about 1cm per year. […] Paget’s disease alters the mechanical properties of the bone. Thus, pagetic bones are more likely to bend under normal physiological loads and are thus liable to fracture. […] Pagetic bones are also larger than their normal counterparts. This can lead to ↑ arthritis at adjacent joints and to pressure on nerves, leading to neurological compression syndromes and, when it occurs in the skull base, sensorineural deafness.”

“Paget’s disease is present in about 2% of the UK population over the age of 55. It’s prevalence increases with age, and it is more common in ♂ than ♀. Only about 10% of affected patients will have symptomatic disease. […] Most notable feature is pain. […] The diagnosis of Paget’s disease is primarily radiological. […] An isotope bone scan is frequently helpful in assessing the extent of skeletal involvement […] Deafness is present in up to half of cases of skull base Paget’s. • Other neurological complications are rare. […] Osteogenic sarcoma [is a] very rare complication of Paget’s disease. […] Any increase of pain in a patient with Paget’s disease should arouse suspicion of sarcomatous degeneration. A more common cause, however, is resumption of activity of disease. […] Treatment with agents that decrease bone turnover reduces disease activity […] Although such treatment has been shown to help pain, there is little evidence that it benefits other consequences of Paget’s disease. In particular, the deafness of Paget’s disease does not regress after treatment […] Bisphosphonates have become the mainstay of treatment. […] Goals of treatment [are to:] • Minimize symptoms. • Prevent long-term complications. • Normalize bone turnover. • Alkaline phosphatase in normal range. • No actual evidence that treatment achieves this.”

The rest of this post will be devoted to covering topics from chapter 8:

Neuroendocrine cells are found in many sites throughout the body. They are particularly prominent in the GI tract and pancreas and […] have the ability to synthesize, store, and release peptide hormones. […] the majority of neuroendocrine tumours occur within the gastroenteropancreatic axis. […] >50% are traditionally termed carcinoid tumours […] with the remainder largely comprising pancreatic islet cell tumours. • Carcinoid and islet cell tumours are generally slow-growing. […] There is a move towards standardizing the terminology of these tumours […] The term NEN [neuroendocrine neoplasia] included low- and intermediate-grade neoplasia (previously referred to as carcinoid or atypical carcinoid) which are now referred to as neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) and high-grade neoplasia (neuroendocrine carcinoma, NEC). There is a confusing array of classifications of NENs, based on anatomical origin, histology, and secretory activity. • Many of these classifications are well established and widely used.”

“It is important to understand the differences between ‘differentiation’, which is the extent to which the neoplastic cells resemble their non-tumourous counterparts, and ‘grade’, which is the inherent agressiveness of the tumour. […] Neuroendocrine carcinomas are the most aggressive NENs and can be either small or large cell type. […] NENs are diagnosed based on histological features of biopsy specimens. The presenting features of the tumours vary like any other tumour, based on their anatomical location, such as abdominal pain, intestinal obstruction. Many are incidentally discovered during endoscopy or imaging for unrelated conditions. In a database study, 49% of NENs were localized, 24% had regional metastases, and 27% had distant metastases. […] These tumours rarely manifest themselves due to their secretory effect. [This is quite different from some of the other tumours they covered elsewhere in the book – US]  [….] Only a third of patients with neuroendocrine tumours develop symptoms due to hormone secretion.”

“Surgery is the treatment of choice for NENs grades 1 and 2, except in the presence of widespread distant metastases and extensive local invasion. […] Somatostatin analogues (SSA) have relatively minor side effects and provide long-term symptom control. •Octreotide and lanreotide […] reduce the level of biochemical tumour markers in the majority of patients and control symptoms in around 70% of cases. […] A combination of interferon with octreotide has been shown to produce biochemical and symptomatic improvement in patients who have previously had no significant benefit from either drug alone. […] Cytotoxic chemotherapy may be considered in patients with progressive, advanced, or uncontrolled symptomatic disease.”

“Despite the changes in nomenclature of NENs […] the ‘carcinoid crisis’ [apparently also termed ‘malignant carcinoid syndrome‘, US] is still an important descriptive term. It is a potentially life-threatening condition that should be prevented, where possible, and treated as an emergency. • Clinical features include hypotension, tachycardia, arrhythmias, flushing, diarrhoea, broncospasm, and altered sensoriom. […] carcinoid crisis can be triggered by manipulation of the tumours, such as during biopsy, surgery, or palpation. • These result in the release of biologically active compounds from the tumours. […] Carcinoid heart disease […] result in valvular stenosis or regurgitation and eventually heart failure. This condition is seen in 40-50% of patients with carcinoid syndrome and 3-4% of patients with neuroendocrine tumours”.

“An insulinoma is a functioning neuroendocrine tumour of the pancreas that causes hypoglycemia through inappropriate secretion of insulin. • Unlike other neuroendocrine tumours of the pancreas, more than 90% of insulinomas are benign. […] annual incidence of insulinomas is of the order of 1-2 per million population. […] The treatment of choice in all, but poor, surgical candidates is operative removal. […] In experienced surgical hands, the mortality is less than 1%. […] Following the removal of solitary insulinoma [>80% of cases], life expectancy is restored to normal. Malignant insulinomas, with metastases usually to the liver, have a natural history of years, rather than months, and may be controlled with medical therapy or specific antitumour therapy […] • Average 5-year survival estimated to be approximately 35% for malignant insulinomas. […] Gastrinomas are the most common functional malignant pancreatic endocrine tumours. […] The incidence of gastrinomas is 0.5-2/million population/year. […] Gastrin […] is the principal gut hormone stimulating gastric acid secretion. • The Zollinger-Ellison (ZE) syndrome is characterized by gastric acid oversecretion and manifests itself as severe peptic ulcer disease (PUD), gastro-oesophageal reflux, and diarrhoea. […] 10-year survival [in patients with gastrinomas] without liver metastases is 95%. […] Where there are diffuse metastases, […] a 10-year survival of approximately 15% [is observed].”

One of the things I was thinking about before deciding whether or not to blog this chapter was whether the (fortunately!) rare conditions encountered in the chapter really ‘deserved’ to be covered. Unlike what is the case for, say, breast cancer or colon cancer, most people won’t know someone who’ll die from malignant insulinoma. However although these conditions are very rare, I also can’t stop myself from thinking they’re also quite interesting, and I don’t care much about whether I know someone with a disease I’ve read about. And if you think these conditions are rare, well, for glucagonomas “The annual incidence is estimated at 1 per 20 million population”. These very rare conditions really serve as a reminder of how great our bodies are at dealing with all kinds of problems we’ve never even thought about. We don’t think about them precisely because a problem so rarely arises – but just now and then, well…

Let’s talk a little bit more about those glucagonomas:

“Glucagonomas are neuroendocrine tumours that usually arise from the α cells of the pancreas and produce the glucagonoma syndrome through the secretion of glucagon and other peptides derived from the preproglucagon gene. • The large majority of glucagonomas are malignant, but they are also very indolent tumours, and the diagnosis may be overlooked for many years. • Up to 90% of patients will have lymph node or liver metastases at the time of presentation. • They are classically associated with the rash of necrolytic migratory erythema. […] The characteristic rash [….] occurs in >70% of cases […] glucose intolerance is a frequent association (>90%). • Sustained gluconeogenesis also causes amino acid deficiencies and results in protein catabolism which can be associated with unrelenting weight loss in >60% of patients. • Glucagon has a direct suppressive effect on the bone marrow, resulting in a normochromic normocytic anaemia in almost all patients. […] Surgery is the only curative option, but the potential for a complete cure may be as low as 5%.”

“In 1958, Verner and Morrison1 first described a syndrome consisting of refractory watery diarrhoea and hypokalaemia, associated with a neuroendocrine tumour of the pancreas. • The syndrome of watery diarrhea, hypokalaemia and acidosis (WDHA) is due to secretion of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP). • Tumours that secrete VIP are known as VIPomas. VIPomas account for <10% of islet cell tumours and mainly occur as solitary tumours. >60% are malignant […] The most prominent symptom in most patients is profuse watery diarrhoea […] Surgery to remove the tumour is the treatment of first choice […] and may be curative in around 40% of patients. […] Somatostatin analogues produce effective symptomatic relief from the diarrhoea in most patients. Long-term use does not result in tumour regression. […] Chemotherapy […] has resulted in response rates of >30%.”

So by now we know that somatostatin analogues can provide symptom relief in a variety of contexts when you’re dealing with these conditions. But wait, what happens if you get a functional tumour of the cells that produce somatostatins? Will this mean that you just feel great all the time, or that you at least don’t have any symptoms of disease? Well, not exactly…

Somatostatinomas are very rare neuroendocrine tumours, occurring both in the pancreas and in the duodenum. • >60% are large tumours located in the head or body of the pancreas. • The clinical syndrome may be diagnosed late in the course of disease when metastatic spread to local lymph nodes and the liver has already occurred. […] • Glucose intolerance or frank diabetes mellitus may have been observed for many years prior to the diagnosis and retrospectively often represents the first clinical sign. It is probably due to the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on insulin secretion. • A high incidence of gallstones has been described similar to that seen as a side effect with long-term somatostatin analogue therapy. • Diarrhoea, steatorrhoea, and weight loss appear to be consistent clinical features […this despite the fact that you use the hormone produced by these tumours to manage diarrhea in other endocrine tumours – it’s stuff like this which makes these rare disorders far from boring to read about! US] and may be associated with inhibition of the exocrine pancreas by somatostatin.”

May 1, 2018 - Posted by | Books, Cancer/oncology, Cardiology, Diabetes, Epidemiology, Medicine, Neurology, Pharmacology

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