Econstudentlog

Neurology Grand Rounds – Typical and Atypical Diabetic Neuropathy

The lecture is not particularly easy to follow if you’re not a neurologist, and/but I assume even neurologists might have difficulties with Liewluck’s (? the second guy’s…) contribution because that guy’s English pronunciation is not great. But if you’re the sort of person who watches neurology lectures online it’s well worth watching.

Said noted in his book on these topics that: “In general pharmacological treatments will not cause anywhere near complete pain relief: “For patients receiving pharmacological treatment, the average pain reduction is about 20-30%, and only 20-35% of patients will achieve at least a 50% pain reduction with available drugs. […] often only partial pain relief from neuropathic pain can be expected, and […] sensory deficits are unlikely to respond to treatment.” Treatment of neuropathic pain is often a trial-and-error process.”

These guys make an even stronger point than Said did: Diabetics who develop painful neuropathies do not get rid of the pain even with treatment – the pain can be managed, but it’s permanent in (…almost? …a few young type 1 diabetics, maybe? But the 60-year old neurologist had never encountered one of those, so odds are against you being one of the lucky ones…) every single case. This of course has some consequences for how patients should be managed – for example you want to devote some time and effort to managing expectations, so people don’t get/have unrealistic ideas about what the treatments which are available may actually accomplish. Another aspect related to this is which sort of treatment options to consider in such a setting, as also noted in the lecture – tolerance development is for example an easily foreseeable problem with opiate treatment which is likely to cause problems down the line if not addressed (but as I pointed out a few years ago, my impression is that: “‘it may not work particularly well in the long run, and there are a lot of side-effects’ is a better argument against [chronic opioid treatment] than the potential for addiction”).

June 23, 2017 Posted by | Diabetes, Lectures, Medicine, Neurology, Pharmacology | Leave a comment

Harnessing phenotypic heterogeneity to design better therapies

Unlike many of the IAS lectures I’ve recently blogged this one is a new lecture – it was uploaded earlier this week. I have to say that I was very surprised – and disappointed – that the treatment strategy discussed in the lecture had not already been analyzed in a lot of detail and been implemented in clinical practice for some time. Why would you not expect the composition of cancer cell subtypes in the tumour microenvironment to change when you start treatment – in any setting where a subgroup of cancer cells has a different level of responsiveness to treatment than ‘the average’, that would to me seem to be the expected outcome. And concepts such as drug holidays and dose adjustments as treatment responses to evolving drug resistance/treatment failure seem like such obvious approaches to try out here (…the immunologists dealing with HIV infection have been studying such things for decades). I guess ‘better late than never’.

A few papers mentioned/discussed in the lecture:

Impact of Metabolic Heterogeneity on Tumor Growth, Invasion, and Treatment Outcomes.
Adaptive vs continuous cancer therapy: Exploiting space and trade-offs in drug scheduling.
Exploiting evolutionary principles to prolong tumor control in preclinical models of breast cancer.

June 11, 2017 Posted by | Cancer/oncology, Genetics, Immunology, Lectures, Mathematics, Medicine, Studies | Leave a comment

Cosmology: Recent Results and Future Prospects

This is another old lecture from my bookmarks. I’m reasonably certain the main reason why I did not blog this earlier is that it’s a rather general and not very detailed overview lecture, so it doesn’t actually contain a lot of new stuff. Hubble’s work, the discovery of the cosmic microwave background, properties of the early universe and how it evolved, discussion of the cosmological constant, dark matter and dark energy, some recent observational results – most of the stuff he talks about should be familiar territory to people interested in the field. Before I watched the lecture I had expected it to include a lot more ‘recent results’ and ‘future prospects’ than were actually included; a big part of the lecture is just an overview of what we’ve learned since the 1930es.

June 7, 2017 Posted by | Astronomy, Lectures, Physics | Leave a comment

Extraordinary Physics with Millisecond Pulsars

A few related links:
Nanograv.org.
Millisecond pulsar.
PSR J0348+0432.
Pulsar timing array.
Detection of Gravitational Waves using Pulsar Timing (paper).
The strong equivalence principle.
European Pulsar Timing Array.
Parkes Observatory.
Gravitational wave.
Gravitational waves from binary supermassive black holes missing in pulsar observations (paper – it’s been a long time since I watched the lecture, but in my bookmarks I noted that some of the stuff included in this publication was covered in the lecture).

May 24, 2017 Posted by | Astronomy, Lectures, Papers, Physics | Leave a comment

Imported Plant Diseases

I found myself debating whether or not I should read Lewis, Petrovskii, and Potts’ text The Mathematics Behind Biological Invasions a while back, but at the time I in the end decided that it would simply be too much work to justify the potential payoff – so instead of reading the book, I decided to just watch the above lecture and leave it at that. This lecture is definitely a very poor textbook substitute, and I was strongly debating whether or not to blog it because it just isn’t very good; the level of coverage is very low. Which is sad, because some of the diseases discussed in the lecture – like e.g. wheat leaf rust – are really important and worth knowing about. One of the important points made in the lecture is that in the context of potential epidemics, it can be difficult to know when and how to intervene because of the uncertainty involved; early action may be the more efficient choice in terms of resource use, but the earlier you intervene, the less certain will be the intervention payoff and the less you’ll know about stuff like transmission patterns (…would outbreak X ever really have spread very wide if we had not intervened? We don’t observe the counterfactual…). Such aspects of course are not only relevant to plant-diseases, and the lecture also contains other basic insights from epidemiology which apply to other types of disease – but if you’ve ever opened a basic epidemiology text you’ll know all these things already.

May 22, 2017 Posted by | Biology, Botany, Ecology, Epidemiology, Lectures | Leave a comment

Out of this World: A history of Structure in the Universe

This lecture is much less technical than were the last couple of lectures I posted, and if I remember correctly it’s aimed at a general audience (…the sort of ‘general audience’ that attends IAS lectures, but even so…). The lecture itself is quite short, only roughly 35 minutes long, but there’s a long Q&A session afterwards.

May 21, 2017 Posted by | Astronomy, Lectures, Physics | Leave a comment

The Mathematical Challenge of Large Networks

This is another one of the aforementioned lectures I watched a while ago, but had never got around to blogging:

If I had to watch this one again, I’d probably skip most of the second half; it contains highly technical coverage of topics in graph theory, and it was very difficult for me to follow (but I did watch it to the end, just out of curiosity).

The lecturer has put up a ~500 page publication on these and related topics, which is available here, so if you want to know more that’s an obvious place to go have a look. A few other relevant links to stuff mentioned/covered in the lecture:
Szemerédi regularity lemma.
Graphon.
Turán’s theorem.
Quantum graph.

May 19, 2017 Posted by | Computer science, Lectures, Mathematics, Statistics | Leave a comment

Hydrodynamical Simulations of Galaxy Formation: Progress, Pitfalls, and Promises

“This calculation was relatively expensive, about 19 million CPU hours were spent on it.”

….

Posts including only one lecture is a recent innovation here on the blog as I have in the past bundled lectures so that a lecture post would include at least 2 or 3 lectures, but I am starting to come around to the idea that these new types of posts are a good idea. I have been going over some old lectures I’ve watched in the past recently, and it turns out that there are quite a few lectures I never got around to blogging; I have mentioned before how the 3 lectures per post format was likely suboptimal, in the sense that they tended to lead to lectures never being covered e.g. because of the long time lag between watching a lecture and blogging it (in the case of book blogging I tend to be much more likely to spend my time covering books I read recently, rather than books I read a while ago, and the same dynamic goes for lectures), and I think this impression is now confirmed.

As some of the lectures I’ll be covering in posts like these in the future are lectures I watched a long time ago my coverage will probably be limited to the actual lectures and the comments I wrote down when I first watched the lecture in question. I don’t want to add a few big lecture posts to just get rid of the backlog, mostly because this blog is obviously not nearly as active as it used to be, and adding single-lecture posts dropwise is an easy (…low-effort) and convenient way for me to keep the blog at least somewhat active. What I wrote down in my comments about the lecture above when I watched it, aside from the quote above, is that considering the very high-level physics included it was sort of surprising to me that the lecture was not so technical as to not be worth watching – but it wasn’t. You’ll certainly not understand all of it, but it’s interesting stuff.

May 18, 2017 Posted by | Astronomy, Lectures, Physics | Leave a comment

Today’s Landscape of Pharmaceutical Research in Cancer

It’s been a while since I watched this lecture so I don’t remember the details very well, but I usually add notes in my bookmarks when I watch lectures so that I know what details to include in my comments here on the blog, and I have added the details from the bookmark notes below.

It is a short lecture, the lecture itself lasts only roughly 30 minutes; it doesn’t really start until roughly the 9 minutes and 30 seconds mark, and it finishes around the 44 min mark (the rest is Q&A – I skipped some of the introduction, but watched the Q&A). The lecture is not very technical, I think the content is perfectly understandable also to people without a medical background. One data point from the lecture which I thought worth including in these comments is this: According to Sigal, “roughly 30 per cent of the biopharmaceutical industry’s portfolio … is focused on research in oncology.”

May 17, 2017 Posted by | Cancer/oncology, Immunology, Lectures, Medicine, Pharmacology | Leave a comment

Quantifying tradeoffs between fairness and accuracy in online learning

From a brief skim of this paper, which is coauthored by the guy giving this lecture, it looked to me like it covers many of the topics discussed in the lecture. So if you’re unsure as to whether or not to watch the lecture (…or if you want to know more about this stuff after you’ve watched the lecture) you might want to have a look at that paper. Although the video is long for a single lecture I would note that the lecture itself lasts only approximately one hour; the last 10 minutes are devoted to Q&A.

May 12, 2017 Posted by | Computer science, Economics, Lectures, Mathematics | Leave a comment

Standing on the Shoulders of Mice: Aging T-cells

Most of the lecture is not about mice, but rather about stuff like this and this (both papers are covered in the lecture). I’ve read about related topics before (see e.g this), but if you haven’t some parts of the lecture will probably be too technical for you to follow.

May 3, 2017 Posted by | Cancer/oncology, Cardiology, Genetics, Immunology, Lectures, Medicine, Papers | Leave a comment

Information complexity and applications

I have previously here on the blog posted multiple lectures in my ‘lecture-posts’, or I have combined a lecture with other stuff (e.g. links such as those in the previous ‘random stuff’ post). I think such approaches have made me less likely to post lectures on the blog (if I don’t post a lecture soon after I’ve watched it, my experience tells me that I not infrequently simply never get around to posting it), and combined with this issue is also the issue that I don’t really watch a lot of lectures these days. For these reasons I have decided to start posting single lecture posts here on the blog; when I start thinking about the time expenditure of people reading along here in a way this approach actually also seems justified – although it might take me as much time/work to watch and cover, say, 4 lectures as it would take me to read and cover 100 pages of a textbook, the time expenditure required by a reader of the blog would be very different in those two cases (you’ll usually be able to read a post that took me multiple hours to write in a short amount of time, whereas ‘the time advantage’ of the reader is close to negligible (maybe not completely; search costs are not completely irrelevant) in the case of lectures). By posting multiple lectures in the same post I probably decrease the expected value of the time readers spend watching the content I upload, which seems suboptimal.

Here’s the youtube description of the lecture, which was posted a few days ago on the IAS youtube account:

“Over the past two decades, information theory has reemerged within computational complexity theory as a mathematical tool for obtaining unconditional lower bounds in a number of models, including streaming algorithms, data structures, and communication complexity. Many of these applications can be systematized and extended via the study of information complexity – which treats information revealed or transmitted as the resource to be conserved. In this overview talk we will discuss the two-party information complexity and its properties – and the interactive analogues of classical source coding theorems. We will then discuss applications to exact communication complexity bounds, hardness amplification, and quantum communication complexity.”

He actually decided to skip the quantum communication complexity stuff because of the time constraint. I should note that the lecture was ‘easy enough’ for me to follow most of it, so it is not really that difficult, at least not if you know some basic information theory.

A few links to related stuff (you can take these links as indications of what sort of stuff the lecture is about/discusses, if you’re on the fence about whether or not to watch it):
Computational complexity theory.
Shannon entropy.
Shannon’s source coding theorem.
Communication complexity.
Communications protocol.
Information-based complexity.
Hash function.
From Information to Exact Communication (in the lecture he discusses some aspects covered in this paper).
Unique games conjecture (Two-prover proof systems).
A Counterexample to Strong Parallel Repetition (another paper mentioned/briefly discussed during the lecture).
Pinsker’s inequality.

An interesting aspect I once again noted during this lecture is the sort of loose linkage you sometimes observe between the topics of game theory/microeconomics and computer science. Of course the link is made explicit a few minutes later in the talk when he discusses the unique games conjecture to which I link above, but it’s perhaps worth noting that the link is on display even before that point is reached. Around 38 minutes into the lecture he mentions that one of the relevant proofs ‘involves such things as Lagrange multipliers and optimization’. I was far from surprised, as from a certain point of view the problem he discusses at that point is conceptually very similar to some problems encountered in auction theory, where Lagrange multipliers and optimization problems are frequently encountered… If you are too unfamiliar with that field to realize how the similar problem might appear in an auction theory context, what you have there are instead auction partipants who prefer not to reveal their true willingness to pay; and some auction designs actually work in a very similar manner as does the (pseudo-)protocol described in the lecture, and are thus used to reveal it (for some subset of participants at least)).

March 12, 2017 Posted by | Computer science, Game theory, Lectures, Papers | Leave a comment

Random Stuff

i. On the youtube channel of the Institute for Advanced Studies there has been a lot of activity over the last week or two (far more than 100 new lectures have been uploaded, and it seems new uploads are still being added at this point), and I’ve been watching a few of the recently uploaded astrophysics lectures. They’re quite technical, but you can watch them and follow enough of the content to have an enjoyable time despite not understanding everything:


This is a good lecture, very interesting. One major point made early on: “the take-away message is that the most common planet in the galaxy, at least at shorter periods, are planets for which there is no analogue in the solar system. The most common kind of planet in the galaxy is a planet with a radius of two Earth radii.” Another big take-away message is that small planets seem to be quite common (as noted in the conclusions, “16% of Sun-like stars have an Earth-sized planet”).


Of the lectures included in this post this was the one I liked the least; there are too many (‘obstructive’) questions/interactions between lecturer and attendants along the way, and the interactions/questions are difficult to hear/understand. If you consider watching both this lecture and the lecture below, I would say that it would probably be wise to watch the lecture below this one before you watch this one; I concluded that in retrospect some of the observations made early on in the lecture below would have been useful to know about before watching this lecture. (The first half of the lecture below was incidentally to me somewhat easier to follow than was the second half, but especially the first half hour of it is really quite good, despite the bad start (which one can always blame on Microsoft…)).

ii. Words I’ve encountered recently (…or ‘recently’ – it’s been a while since I last posted one of these lists): Divagationsperiphrasis, reedy, architravesettpedipalp, tout, togs, edentulous, moue, tatty, tearaway, prorogue, piscine, fillip, sop, panniers, auxology, roister, prepossessing, cantle, catamite, couth, ordure, biddy, recrudescence, parvenu, scupper, husting, hackle, expatiate, affray, tatterdemalion, eructation, coppice, dekko, scull, fulmination, pollarding, grotty, secateurs, bumf (I must admit that I like this word – it seems fitting, somehow, to use that word for this concept…), durophagy, randy, (brief note to self: Advise people having children who ask me about suggestions for how to name them against using this name (or variants such as Randi), it does not seem like a great idea), effete, apricity, sororal, bint, coition, abaft, eaves, gadabout, lugubriously, retroussé, landlubber, deliquescence, antimacassar, inanition.

iii. “The point of rigour is not to destroy all intuition; instead, it should be used to destroy bad intuition while clarifying and elevating good intuition. It is only with a combination of both rigorous formalism and good intuition that one can tackle complex mathematical problems; one needs the former to correctly deal with the fine details, and the latter to correctly deal with the big picture. Without one or the other, you will spend a lot of time blundering around in the dark (which can be instructive, but is highly inefficient). So once you are fully comfortable with rigorous mathematical thinking, you should revisit your intuitions on the subject and use your new thinking skills to test and refine these intuitions rather than discard them. One way to do this is to ask yourself dumb questions; another is to relearn your field.” (Terry Tao, There’s more to mathematics than rigour and proofs)

iv. A century of trends in adult human height. A figure from the paper (Figure 3 – Change in adult height between the 1896 and 1996 birth cohorts):

elife-13410-fig3-v1

(Click to view full size. WordPress seems to have changed the way you add images to a blog post – if this one is even so annoyingly large, I apologize, I have tried to minimize it while still retaining detail, but the original file is huge). An observation from the paper:

“Men were taller than women in every country, on average by ~11 cm in the 1896 birth cohort and ~12 cm in the 1996 birth cohort […]. In the 1896 birth cohort, the male-female height gap in countries where average height was low was slightly larger than in taller nations. In other words, at the turn of the 20th century, men seem to have had a relative advantage over women in undernourished compared to better-nourished populations.”

I haven’t studied the paper in any detail but intend to do so at a later point in time.

v. I found this paper, on Exercise and Glucose Metabolism in Persons with Diabetes Mellitus, interesting in part because I’ve been very surprised a few times by offhand online statements made by diabetic athletes, who had observed that their blood glucose really didn’t drop all that fast during exercise. Rapid and annoyingly large drops in blood glucose during exercise have been a really consistent feature of my own life with diabetes during adulthood. It seems that there may be big inter-individual differences in terms of the effects of exercise on glucose in diabetics. From the paper:

“Typically, prolonged moderate-intensity aerobic exercise (i.e., 30–70% of one’s VO2max) causes a reduction in glucose concentrations because of a failure in circulating insulin levels to decrease at the onset of exercise.12 During this type of physical activity, glucose utilization may be as high as 1.5 g/min in adolescents with type 1 diabetes13 and exceed 2.0 g/min in adults with type 1 diabetes,14 an amount that quickly lowers circulating glucose levels. Persons with type 1 diabetes have large interindividual differences in blood glucose responses to exercise, although some intraindividual reproducibility exists.15 The wide ranging glycemic responses among individuals appears to be related to differences in pre-exercise blood glucose concentrations, the level of circulating counterregulatory hormones and the type/duration of the activity.2

August 13, 2016 Posted by | Astronomy, Demographics, Diabetes, language, Lectures, Mathematics, Physics, Random stuff | Leave a comment

Random stuff

I find it difficult to find the motivation to finish the half-finished drafts I have lying around, so this will have to do. Some random stuff below.

i.

(15.000 views… In some sense that seems really ‘unfair’ to me, but on the other hand I doubt neither Beethoven nor Gilels care; they’re both long dead, after all…)

ii. New/newish words I’ve encountered in books, on vocabulary.com or elsewhere:

Agleyperipeteia, disseverhalidom, replevinsocage, organdie, pouffe, dyarchy, tauricide, temerarious, acharnement, cadger, gravamen, aspersion, marronage, adumbrate, succotash, deuteragonist, declivity, marquetry, machicolation, recusal.

iii. A lecture:

It’s been a long time since I watched it so I don’t have anything intelligent to say about it now, but I figured it might be of interest to one or two of the people who still subscribe to the blog despite the infrequent updates.

iv. A few wikipedia articles (I won’t comment much on the contents or quote extensively from the articles the way I’ve done in previous wikipedia posts – the links shall have to suffice for now):

Duverger’s law.

Far side of the moon.

Preference falsification.

Russian political jokes. Some of those made me laugh (e.g. this one: “A judge walks out of his chambers laughing his head off. A colleague approaches him and asks why he is laughing. “I just heard the funniest joke in the world!” “Well, go ahead, tell me!” says the other judge. “I can’t – I just gave someone ten years for it!”).

Political mutilation in Byzantine culture.

v. World War 2, if you think of it as a movie, has a highly unrealistic and implausible plot, according to this amusing post by Scott Alexander. Having recently read a rather long book about these topics, one aspect I’d have added had I written the piece myself would be that an additional factor making the setting seem even more implausible is how so many presumably quite smart people were so – what at least in retrospect seems – unbelievably stupid when it came to Hitler’s ideas and intentions before the war. Going back to Churchill’s own life I’d also add that if you were to make a movie about Churchill’s life during the war, which you could probably relatively easily do if you were to just base it upon his own copious and widely shared notes, then it could probably be made into a quite decent movie. His own comments, remarks, and observations certainly made for a great book.

May 15, 2016 Posted by | Astronomy, Computer science, History, language, Lectures, Mathematics, Music, Random stuff, Russia, Wikipedia | Leave a comment

Random Stuff

i. Some new words I’ve encountered (not all of them are from vocabulary.com, but many of them are):

Uxoricide, persnickety, logy, philoprogenitive, impassive, hagiography, gunwale, flounce, vivify, pelage, irredentism, pertinacity,callipygous, valetudinarian, recrudesce, adjuration, epistolary, dandle, picaresque, humdinger, newel, lightsome, lunette, inflect, misoneism, cormorant, immanence, parvenu, sconce, acquisitiveness, lingual, Macaronic, divot, mettlesome, logomachy, raffish, marginalia, omnifarious, tatter, licit.

ii. A lecture:

I got annoyed a few times by the fact that you can’t tell where he’s pointing when he’s talking about the slides, which makes the lecture harder to follow than it ought to be, but it’s still an interesting lecture.

iii. Facts about Dihydrogen Monoxide. Includes coverage of important neglected topics such as ‘What is the link between Dihydrogen Monoxide and school violence?’ After reading the article, I am frankly outraged that this stuff’s still legal!

iv. Some wikipedia links of interest:

Steganography.

Steganography […] is the practice of concealing a file, message, image, or video within another file, message, image, or video. The word steganography combines the Greek words steganos (στεγανός), meaning “covered, concealed, or protected”, and graphein (γράφειν) meaning “writing”. […] Generally, the hidden messages appear to be (or be part of) something else: images, articles, shopping lists, or some other cover text. For example, the hidden message may be in invisible ink between the visible lines of a private letter. Some implementations of steganography that lack a shared secret are forms of security through obscurity, whereas key-dependent steganographic schemes adhere to Kerckhoffs’s principle.[1]

The advantage of steganography over cryptography alone is that the intended secret message does not attract attention to itself as an object of scrutiny. Plainly visible encrypted messages—no matter how unbreakable—arouse interest, and may in themselves be incriminating in countries where encryption is illegal.[2] Thus, whereas cryptography is the practice of protecting the contents of a message alone, steganography is concerned with concealing the fact that a secret message is being sent, as well as concealing the contents of the message.”

H. H. Holmes. A really nice guy.

Herman Webster Mudgett (May 16, 1861 – May 7, 1896), better known under the name of Dr. Henry Howard Holmes or more commonly just H. H. Holmes, was one of the first documented serial killers in the modern sense of the term.[1][2] In Chicago, at the time of the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition, Holmes opened a hotel which he had designed and built for himself specifically with murder in mind, and which was the location of many of his murders. While he confessed to 27 murders, of which nine were confirmed, his actual body count could be up to 200.[3] He brought an unknown number of his victims to his World’s Fair Hotel, located about 3 miles (4.8 km) west of the fair, which was held in Jackson Park. Besides being a serial killer, H. H. Holmes was also a successful con artist and a bigamist. […]

Holmes purchased an empty lot across from the drugstore where he built his three-story, block-long hotel building. Because of its enormous structure, local people dubbed it “The Castle”. The building was 162 feet long and 50 feet wide. […] The ground floor of the Castle contained Holmes’ own relocated drugstore and various shops, while the upper two floors contained his personal office and a labyrinth of rooms with doorways opening to brick walls, oddly-angled hallways, stairways leading to nowhere, doors that could only be opened from the outside and a host of other strange and deceptive constructions. Holmes was constantly firing and hiring different workers during the construction of the Castle, claiming that “they were doing incompetent work.” His actual reason was to ensure that he was the only one who fully understood the design of the building.[3]

Minnesota Starvation Experiment.

“The Minnesota Starvation Experiment […] was a clinical study performed at the University of Minnesota between November 19, 1944 and December 20, 1945. The investigation was designed to determine the physiological and psychological effects of severe and prolonged dietary restriction and the effectiveness of dietary rehabilitation strategies.

The motivation of the study was twofold: First, to produce a definitive treatise on the subject of human starvation based on a laboratory simulation of severe famine and, second, to use the scientific results produced to guide the Allied relief assistance to famine victims in Europe and Asia at the end of World War II. It was recognized early in 1944 that millions of people were in grave danger of mass famine as a result of the conflict, and information was needed regarding the effects of semi-starvation—and the impact of various rehabilitation strategies—if postwar relief efforts were to be effective.”

“most of the subjects experienced periods of severe emotional distress and depression.[1]:161 There were extreme reactions to the psychological effects during the experiment including self-mutilation (one subject amputated three fingers of his hand with an axe, though the subject was unsure if he had done so intentionally or accidentally).[5] Participants exhibited a preoccupation with food, both during the starvation period and the rehabilitation phase. Sexual interest was drastically reduced, and the volunteers showed signs of social withdrawal and isolation.[1]:123–124 […] One of the crucial observations of the Minnesota Starvation Experiment […] is that the physical effects of the induced semi-starvation during the study closely approximate the conditions experienced by people with a range of eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.”

Post-vasectomy pain syndrome. Vasectomy reversal is a risk people probably know about, but this one seems to also be worth being aware of if one is considering having a vasectomy.

Transport in the Soviet Union (‘good article’). A few observations from the article:

“By the mid-1970s, only eight percent of the Soviet population owned a car. […]  From 1924 to 1971 the USSR produced 1 million vehicles […] By 1975 only 8 percent of rural households owned a car. […] Growth of motor vehicles had increased by 224 percent in the 1980s, while hardcore surfaced roads only increased by 64 percent. […] By the 1980s Soviet railways had become the most intensively used in the world. Most Soviet citizens did not own private transport, and if they did, it was difficult to drive long distances due to the poor conditions of many roads. […] Road transport played a minor role in the Soviet economy, compared to domestic rail transport or First World road transport. According to historian Martin Crouch, road traffic of goods and passengers combined was only 14 percent of the volume of rail transport. It was only late in its existence that the Soviet authorities put emphasis on road construction and maintenance […] Road transport as a whole lagged far behind that of rail transport; the average distance moved by motor transport in 1982 was 16.4 kilometres (10.2 mi), while the average for railway transport was 930 km per ton and 435 km per ton for water freight. In 1982 there was a threefold increase in investment since 1960 in motor freight transport, and more than a thirtyfold increase since 1940.”

March 3, 2016 Posted by | Biology, Cryptography, History, language, Lectures, Random stuff, Wikipedia, Zoology | Leave a comment

A few lectures

The sound quality of this lecture is not completely optimal – there’s a recurring echo popping up now and then which I found slightly annoying – but this should not keep you from watching the lecture. It’s a quite good lecture, and very accessible – I don’t really think you even need to know anything about genetics to follow most of what he’s talking about here; as far as I can tell it’s a lecture intended for people who don’t really know much about population genetics. He introduces key concepts as they are needed and he does not go much into the technical details which might cause people trouble (this of course also makes the lecture somewhat superficial, but you can’t get everything). If you’re the sort of person who wants details not included in the lecture you’re probably already reading e.g. Razib Khan (who incidentally recently blogged/criticized a not too dissimilar paper from the one discussed in the lecture, dealing with South Asia)…

I must admit that I actually didn’t like this lecture very much, but I figured I might as well include it in this post anyway.

I found some questions included and some aspects of the coverage a bit ‘too basic’ for my taste, but other people interested in chess reading along here may like Anna’s approach better; like Krause’s lecture I think it’s an accessible lecture, despite the fact that it actually covers many lines in quite a bit of detail. It’s a long lecture but I don’t think you necessarily need to watch all of it in one go (…or at all?) – the analysis of the second game, the Kortschnoj-Gheorghiu game, starts around 45 minutes in so that might for example be a good place to include a break, if a break is required.

February 1, 2016 Posted by | Anthropology, Archaeology, Chess, Computer science, Evolutionary biology, Genetics, History, Lectures | Leave a comment

A few lectures

Below are three new lectures from the Institute of Advanced Study. As far as I’ve gathered they’re all from an IAS symposium called ‘Lens of Computation on the Sciences’ – all three lecturers are computer scientists, but you don’t have to be a computer scientist to watch these lectures.

Should computer scientists and economists band together more and try to use the insights from one field to help solve problems in the other field? Roughgarden thinks so, and provides examples of how this might be done/has been done. Applications discussed in the lecture include traffic management and auction design. I’m not sure how much of this lecture is easy to follow for people who don’t know anything about either topic (i.e., computer science and economics), but I found it not too difficult to follow – it probably helped that I’ve actually done work on a few of the things he touches upon in the lecture, such as basic auction theory, the fixed point theorems and related proofs, basic queueing theory and basic discrete maths/graph theory. Either way there are certainly much more technical lectures than this one available at the IAS channel.

I don’t have Facebook and I’m not planning on ever getting a FB account, so I’m not really sure I care about the things this guy is trying to do, but the lecturer does touch upon some interesting topics in network theory. Not a great lecture in my opinion and occasionally I think the lecturer ‘drifts’ a bit, talking without saying very much, but it’s also not a terrible lecture. A few times I was really annoyed that you can’t see where he’s pointing that damn laser pointer, but this issue should not stop you from watching the video, especially not if you have an interest in analytical aspects of how to approach and make sense of ‘Big Data’.

I’ve noticed that Scott Alexander has said some nice things about Scott Aaronson a few times, but until now I’ve never actually read any of the latter guy’s stuff or watched any lectures by him. I agree with Scott (Alexander) that Scott (Aaronson) is definitely a smart guy. This is an interesting lecture; I won’t pretend I understood all of it, but it has some thought-provoking ideas and important points in the context of quantum computing and it’s actually a quite entertaining lecture; I was close to laughing a couple of times.

January 8, 2016 Posted by | Computer science, Economics, Game theory, Lectures, Mathematics, Physics | Leave a comment

A few lectures

I was debating whether to post this, but considering how long it’s been since my last post I decided to do it. A large number of lectures have recently been uploaded by the Institute for Advanced Studies, and despite the fact that most of my ‘blogging-related activities’ these days relate to book reading I have watched a few of those lectures, and so I decided to post a couple of the lectures here:

I liked this lecture. Part II of the lecture in particular, starting around the 38 minute mark, dealt with stuff reasonably closely related to things I’d read about before (‘relatively’…) recently, back when I read Lammer’s text (blog coverage here); so although I didn’t remember the stuff covered in Lammer’s text in too much detail, it was definitely helpful to have worked with this stuff before. However I do believe you can watch the lecture and sort of understand what she’s talking about without knowing a great deal about these topics, at least if you don’t care too much about understanding all the details (I’d note that there are a lot of things going on ‘behind the scenes’ here, and that you can say a lot of stuff about topics closely related to this talk, like outgassing processes and how they relate to things like volcanism as well as e.g. the dynamic interactions between atmospheric molecules and the solar wind taking place in the early stages of stellar evolution). As is always the case for IAS lectures it’s really hard to hear the questions being asked and that’s annoying, but actually I think miss Schilchting is reasonably good at repeating the question or sort of answer them in a way that enables you to gather what’s ‘going on’; at least the fact that you can’t hear the questions is in my opinion a somewhat bigger problem in the lecture below (relatedly you can actually also see where the laser pointer is pointing in this lecture, at least some of the time – you can’t in the lecture below).

As mentioned this one was harder to follow, at least for me.

I hope to find time to blog a bit more in the days to come. One of several reasons why I’ve not blogged more than I have during the last weeks is that I recently realized that if I put in a bit of effort I’d be able to reach 150 books this year (I’m currently at 143 books, but very close to 144), with 50 non-fiction books (I think going for 52 would be a bit too much, but I’m not ruling it out yet – I’m currently at 47 non-fiction books (…but very close to 48)). I should note that I update the book post to which I link above much more often than I update ‘the blog’ in general with new posts. The reason why the ‘read 150 books this year goal’ is relevant is of course that every time I blog a book here on the blog, this takes away a substantial amount of time which I can’t spend actually reading books. Goodreads incidentally have recently made a nice ‘book of the year’ profile where you can see more details about the books I’ve read etc. From that profile I realized that my implicit working goal of reading 100 pages/day over the year has already been met (I’m currently at ~42.000 pages).

December 18, 2015 Posted by | Astronomy, Books, Lectures, Physics | Leave a comment

A couple of lectures and a little bit of random stuff

i. Two lectures from the Institute for Advanced Studies:

The IAS has recently uploaded a large number of lectures on youtube, and the ones I blog here are a few of those where you can actually tell from the title what the lecture is about; I find it outright weird that these people don’t include the topic covered in the lecture in their lecture titles.

As for the video above, as usual for the IAS videos it’s annoying that you can’t hear the questions asked by the audience, but the sound quality of this video is at least quite a bit better than the sound quality of the video below (which has a couple of really annoying sequences, in particular around the 15-16 minutes mark (it gets better), where the image is also causing problems, and in the last couple of minutes of the Q&A things are also not exactly optimal as the lecturer leaves the area covered by the camera in order to write something on the blackboard – but you don’t know what he’s writing and you can’t see the lecturer, because the camera isn’t following him). I found most of the above lecture easier to follow than I did the lecture posted below, though in either case you’ll probably not understand all of it unless you’re an astrophysicist – you definitely won’t in case of the latter lecture. I found it helpful to look up a few topics along the way, e.g. the wiki articles about the virial theorem (/also dealing with virial mass/radius), active galactic nucleus (this is the ‘AGN’ she refers to repeatedly), and the Tully–Fisher relation.

Given how many questions are asked along the way it’s really annoying that you in most cases can’t hear what people are asking about – this is definitely an area where there’s room for improvement in the context of the IAS videos. The lecture was not easy to follow but I figured along the way that I understood enough of it to make it worth watching the lecture to the end (though I’d say you’ll not miss much if you stop after the lecture – around the 1.05 hours mark – and skip the subsequent Q&A). I’ve relatively recently read about related topics, e.g. pulsar formation and wave- and fluid dynamics, and if I had not I probably would not have watched this lecture to the end.

ii. A vocabulary.com update. I’m slowly working my way up to the ‘Running Dictionary’ rank (I’m only a walking dictionary at this point); here’s some stuff from my progress page:

Vocab
I recently learned from a note added to a list that I’ve actually learned a very large proportion of all words available on vocabulary.com, which probably also means that I may have been too harsh on the word selection algorithm in past posts here on the blog; if there aren’t (/m)any new words left to learn it should not be surprising that the algorithm presents me with words I’ve already mastered, and it’s not the algorithm’s fault that there aren’t more words available for me to learn (well, it is to the extent that you’re of the opinion that questions should be automatically created by the algorithm as well, but I don’t think we’re quite there yet at this point). The aforementioned note was added in June, and here’s the important part: “there are words on your list that Vocabulary.com can’t teach yet. Vocabulary.com can teach over 12,000 words, but sadly, these aren’t among them”. ‘Over 12.000’ – and I’ve mastered 11.300. When the proportion of mastered words is this high, not only will the default random word algorithm mostly present you with questions related to words you’ve already mastered; but it actually also starts to get hard to find lists with many words you’ve not already mastered – I’ll often load lists with one hundred words and then realize that I’ve mastered every word on the list. This is annoying if you have a desire to continually be presented with both new words as well as old ones. Unless vocabulary.com increases the rate with which they add new words I’ll run out of new words to learn, and if that happens I’m sure it’ll be much more difficult for me to find motivation to use the site.

With all that stuff out of the way, if you’re not a regular user of the site I should note – again – that it’s an excellent resource if you desire to increase your vocabulary. Below is a list of words I’ve encountered on the site in recent weeks(/months?):

Copaceticfrumpyelisiontermagantharridanquondam, funambulist, phantasmagoriaeyelet, cachinnate, wilt, quidnunc, flocculent, galoot, frangible, prevaricate, clarion, trivet, noisome, revenant, myrmidon (I have included this word once before in a post of this type, but it is in my opinion a very nice word with which more people should be familiar…), debenture, teeter, tart, satiny, romp, auricular, terpsichorean, poultice, ululation, fusty, tangy, honorarium, eyas, bumptious, muckraker, bayou, hobble, omphaloskepsis, extemporize, virago, rarefaction, flibbertigibbet, finagle, emollient.

iii. I don’t think I’d do things exactly the way she’s suggesting here, but the general idea/approach seems to me appealing enough for it to be worth at least keeping in mind if I ever decide to start dating/looking for a partner.

iv. Some wikipedia links:

Tarrare (featured). A man with odd eating habits and an interesting employment history (“Dr. Courville was keen to continue his investigations into Tarrare’s eating habits and digestive system, and approached General Alexandre de Beauharnais with a suggestion that Tarrare’s unusual abilities and behaviour could be put to military use.[9] A document was placed inside a wooden box which was in turn fed to Tarrare. Two days later, the box was retrieved from his excrement, with the document still in legible condition.[9][17] Courville proposed to de Beauharnais that Tarrare could thus serve as a military courier, carrying documents securely through enemy territory with no risk of their being found if he were searched.” Yeah…).

Cauda equina syndromeCastleman’s disease, Astereognosis, Familial dysautonomia, Homonymous hemianopsia, Amaurosis fugax. All of these are of course related to content covered in the Handbook.

1740 Batavia massacre (featured).

v. I am also fun.

October 30, 2015 Posted by | Astronomy, History, Immunology, language, Lectures, Medicine, Neurology, Personal, Physics, Random stuff, Wikipedia | Leave a comment

A few lectures

This one was mostly review for me, but there was also some new stuff and it was a ‘sort of okay’ lecture even if I was highly skeptical about a few points covered. I was debating whether to even post the lecture on account of those points of contention, but I figured that by adding a few remarks below I could justify doing it. So below a few skeptical comments relating to content covered in the lecture:

a) 28-29 minutes in he mentions that the cutoff for hypertension in diabetics is a systolic pressure above 130. Here opinions definitely differ, and opinions about treatment cutoffs differ; in the annual report from the Danish Diabetes Database they follow up on whether hospitals and other medical decision-making units are following guidelines (I’ve talked about the data on the blog, e.g. here), and the BP goal of involved decision-making units evaluated is currently whether diabetics with systolic BP above 140 receive antihypertensive treatment. This recent Cochrane review concluded that: “At the present time, evidence from randomized trials does not support blood pressure targets lower than the standard targets in people with elevated blood pressure and diabetes” and noted that: “The effect of SBP targets on mortality was compatible with both a reduction and increase in risk […] Trying to achieve the ‘lower’ SBP target was associated with a significant increase in the number of other serious adverse events”.

b) Whether retinopathy screenings should be conducted yearly or biennially is also contested, and opinions differ – this is not mentioned in the lecture, but I sort of figure maybe it should have been. There’s some evidence that annual screening is better (see e.g. this recent review), but the evidence base is not great and clinical outcomes do not seem to differ much in general; as noted in the review, “Observational and economic modelling studies in low-risk patients show little difference in clinical outcomes between screening intervals of 1 year or 2 years”. To stratify based on risk seems desirable from a cost-effectiveness standpoint, but how to stratify optimally seems to not be completely clear at the present point in time.

c) The Somogyi phenomenon is highly contested, and I was very surprised about his coverage of this topic – ‘he’s a doctor lecturing on this topic, he should know better’. As the wiki notes: “Although this theory is well known among clinicians and individuals with diabetes, there is little scientific evidence to support it.” I’m highly skeptical, and I seriously question the advice of lowering insulin in the context of morning hyperglycemia. As observed in Cryer’s text: “there is now considerable evidence against the Somogyi hypothesis (Guillod et al. 2007); morning hyperglycemia is the result of insulin lack, not post-hypoglycemic insulin resistance (Havlin and Cryer 1987; Tordjman et al. 1987; Hirsch et al. 1990). There is a dawn phenomenon—a growth hormone–mediated increase in the nighttime to morning plasma glucose concentration (Campbell et al. 1985)—but its magnitude is small (Periello et al. 1991).”

I decided not to embed this lecture in the post mainly because the resolution is unsatisfactorily low so that a substantial proportion of the visual content is frankly unintelligible; I figured this would bother others more than it did me and that a semi-satisfactory compromise solution in terms of coverage would be to link to the lecture, but not embed it here. You can hear what the lecturer is saying, which was enough for me, but you can’t make out stuff like effect differences, p-values, or many of the details in the graphic illustrations included. Despite the title of the lecture on youtube, the lecture actually mainly consists of a brief overview of pharmacological treatment options for diabetes.

If you want to skip the introduction, the first talk/lecture starts around 5 minutes and 30 seconds into the video. Note that despite the long running time of this video the lectures themselves only take about 50 minutes in total; the rest of it is post-lecture Q&A and discussion.

October 3, 2015 Posted by | Diabetes, Lectures, Mathematics, Medicine, Nephrology, Pharmacology | Leave a comment