Econstudentlog

Words

Most of these words are words which I encountered while reading the Jim Butcher books White Night, Small Favour, Turn Coat, and Changes.

Propitiate. Misericord. Skirling. Idiom. Cadge. Hapless. Roil. Kibble. Viridian. Kine. Shill. Steeple. Décolletage. Kukri. Rondure. Wee. Contrail. Servitor. Pastern. Fetlock.

Coterie. Crochet. Fibrillate. Knead. Divot. Avail. Tamale. Abalone. Cupola. Tuyere. Simulacrum. Bristle. Guff. Shimmy. Prow. Warble. Cannery. Twirl. Winch. Wheelhouse.

Teriyaki. Widdershins. Kibble. Slobber. Surcease. Amble. Invocation. Gasket. Chorale. Rivulet. Choker. Grimoire. Caduceus. Fussbudget. Pate. Scrunchie. Shamble. Ficus. Deposition. Grue.

Aliquot. Nape. Emanation. Atavistic. Menhir. Scrimshaw. Burble. Pauldron. Ornate. Stolid. Wry. Stamen. Ductwork. Speleothem. Philtrum. Hassock. Incipit. Planish. Rheology. Sinter.

 

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November 29, 2017 Posted by | Books, Language | Leave a comment

Words

Most of the words below are words which I encountered while reading the Jim Butcher novels: Fool Moon, Grave Peril, Summer Knight, Death Masks, Blood Rites, Dead Beat, and Proven Guilty.

Gobbet. Corrugate. Whuff. Wino. Shinny. Ruff. Rubberneck. Pastel. Sidhe. Appellation. Tine. Clomp. Susurration. Bier. Pucker. Haft. Topiary. Tendril. Pommel. Swath.

Chitter. Wispy. Flinders. Ewer. Incongruous. Athame. Bole. Chitin. Prancy. Doily. Garland. Heft. Hod. Klaxon. Ravening. Juke. Schlep. Pew. Gaggle. Passel.

Scourge. Coven. Wetwork. Gofer. Hinky. Pratfall. Parti-color(ed). Clawhammer. Mesquite. Scion. Traction. Kirtle. Avaunt. Imbibe. Betimes. Dinky. Rebar. Maw. Strident. Mangel.

GeodePanacheLuminance. WickSusurrus. ChuffWhammy. Cuss. Ripsaw. Scrunch. Fain. Hygroscopicity. Anasarca. Bitumen. Lingula. Diaphoretic. Ketch. Callipygian. Defalcation. Serried.

November 7, 2017 Posted by | Books, Language | Leave a comment

Child psychology

I was not impressed with this book, but as mentioned in the short review it was ‘not completely devoid of observations of interest’.

Before I start my proper coverage of the book, here are some related ‘observations’ from a different book I recently read, Bellwether:

““First we’re all going to play a game. Bethany, it’s Brittany’s birthday.” She attempted a game involving balloons with pink Barbies on them and then gave up and let Brittany open her presents. “Open Sandy’s first,” Gina said, handing her the book.
“No, Caitlin, these are Brittany’s presents.”
Brittany ripped the paper off Toads and Diamonds and looked at it blankly.
“That was my favorite fairy tale when I was little,” I said. “It’s about a girl who meets a good fairy, only she doesn’t, know it because the fairy’s in disguise—” but Brittany had already tossed it aside and was ripping open a Barbie doll in a glittery dress.
“Totally Hair Barbie!” she shrieked.
“Mine,” Peyton said, and made a grab that left Brittany holding nothing but Barbie’s arm.
“She broke Totally Hair Barbie!” Brittany wailed.
Peyton’s mother stood up and said calmly, “Peyton, I think you need a time-out.”
I thought Peyton needed a good swat, or at least to have Totally Hair Barbie taken away from her and given back to Brittany, but instead her mother led her to the door of Gina’s bedroom. “You can come out when you’re in control of your feelings,” she said to Peyton, who looked like she was in control to me.
“I can’t believe you’re still using time-outs,” Chelsea’s mother said. “Everybody’s using holding now.”
“Holding?” I asked.
“You hold the child immobile on your lap until the negative behavior stops. It produces a feeling of interceptive safety.”
“Really,” I said, looking toward the bedroom door. I would have hated trying to hold Peyton against her will.
“Holding’s been totally abandoned,” Lindsay’s mother said. “We use EE.”
“EE?” I said.
“Esteem Enhancement,” Lindsay’s mother said. “EE addresses the positive peripheral behavior no matter how negative the primary behavior is.”
“Positive peripheral behavior?” Gina said dubiously. “When Peyton took the Barbie away from Brittany just now,” Lindsay’s mother said, obviously delighted to explain, “you would have said, ‘My, Peyton, what an assertive grip you have.’”

[A little while later, during the same party:]

“My, Peyton,” Lindsay’s mother said, “what a creative thing to do with your frozen yogurt.””

Okay, on to the coverage of the book. I haven’t covered it in much detail, but I have included some observations of interest below.

“[O]ptimal development of grammar (knowledge about language structure) and phonology (knowledge about the sound elements in words) depends on the brain experiencing sufficient linguistic input. So quantity of language matters. The quality of the language used with young children is also important. The easiest way to extend the quality of language is with interactions around books. […] Natural conversations, focused on real events in the here and now, are those which are critical for optimal development. Despite this evidence, just talking to young children is still not valued strongly in many environments. Some studies find that over 60 per cent of utterances to young children are ‘empty language’ — phrases such as ‘stop that’, ‘don’t go there’, and ‘leave that alone’. […] studies of children who experience high levels of such ‘restricted language’ reveal a negative impact on later cognitive, social, and academic development.”

[Neural] plasticity is largely achieved by the brain growing connections between brain cells that are already there. Any environmental input will cause new connections to form. At the same time, connections that are not used much will be pruned. […] the consistency of what is experienced will be important in determining which connections are pruned and which are retained. […] Brains whose biology makes them less efficient in particular and measurable aspects of processing seem to be at risk in specific areas of development. For example, when auditory processing is less efficient, this can carry a risk of later language impairment.”

“Joint attention has […] been suggested to be the basis of ‘natural pedagogy’ — a social learning system for imparting cultural knowledge. Once attention is shared by adult and infant on an object, an interaction around that object can begin. That interaction usually passes knowledge from carer to child. This is an example of responsive contingency in action — the infant shows an interest in something, the carer responds, and there is an interaction which enables learning. Taking the child’s focus of attention as the starting point for the interaction is very important for effective learning. Of course, skilled carers can also engineer situations in which babies or children will become interested in certain objects. This is the basis of effective play-centred learning. Novel toys or objects are always interesting.”

“Some research suggests that the pitch and amplitude (loudness) of a baby’s cry has been developed by evolution to prompt immediate action by adults. Babies’ cries appear to be designed to be maximally stressful to hear.”

“[T]he important factors in becoming a ‘preferred attachment figure’ are proximity and consistency.”

“[A]dults modify their actions in important ways when they interact with infants. These modifications appear to facilitate learning. ‘Infant-directed action’ is characterized by greater enthusiasm, closer proximity to the infant, greater repetitiveness, and longer gaze to the face than interactions with another adult. Infant-directed action also uses simplified actions with more turn-taking. […] carers tend to use a special tone of voice to talk to babies. This is more sing-song and attention-grabbing than normal conversational speech, and is called ‘infant-directed speech’ [IDS] or ‘Parentese’. All adults and children naturally adopt this special tone when talking to a baby, and babies prefer to listen to Parentese. […] IDS […] heightens pitch, exaggerates the length of words, and uses extra stress, exaggerating the rhythmic or prosodic aspects of speech. […] the heightened prosody increases the salience of acoustic cues to where words begin and end. […] So as well as capturing attention, IDS is emphasizing key linguistic cues that help language acquisition. […] The infant brain seems to cope with the ‘learning problem’ of which sounds matter by initially being sensitive to all the sound elements used by the different world languages. Via acoustic learning during the first year of life, the brain then specializes in the sounds that matter for the particular languages that it is being exposed to.”

“While crawling makes it difficult to carry objects with you on your travels, learning to walk enables babies to carry things. Indeed, walking babies spend most of their time selecting objects and taking them to show their carer, spending on average 30–40 minutes per waking hour interacting with objects. […] Self-generated movement is seen as critical for child development. […] most falling is adaptive, as it helps infants to gain expertise. Indeed, studies show that newly walking infants fall on average 17 times per hour. From the perspective of child psychology, the importance of ‘motor milestones’ like crawling and walking is that they enable greater agency (self-initiated and self-chosen behaviour) on the part of the baby.”

“Statistical learning enables the brain to learn the statistical structure of any event or object. […] Statistical structure is learned in all sensory modalities simultaneously. For example, as the child learns about birds, the child will learn that light body weight, having feathers, having wings, having a beak, singing, and flying, all go together. Each bird that the child sees may be different, but each bird will share the features of flying, having feathers, having wings, and so on. […] The connections that form between the different brain cells that are activated by hearing, seeing, and feeling birds will be repeatedly strengthened for these shared features, thereby creating a multi-modal neural network for that particular concept. The development of this network will be dependent on everyday experiences, and the networks will be richer if the experiences are more varied. This principle of learning supports the use of multi-modal instruction and active experience in nursery and primary school. […] knowledge about concepts is distributed across the entire brain. It is not stored separately in a kind of conceptual ‘dictionary’ or distinct knowledge system. Multi-modal experiences strengthen learning across the whole brain. Accordingly, multisensory learning is the most effective kind of learning for young children.”

“Babies learn words most quickly when an adult both points to and names a new item.”

“…direct teaching of scientific reasoning skills helps children to reason logically independently of their pre-existing beliefs. This is more difficult than it sounds, as pre-existing beliefs exert strong effects. […] in many social situations we are advantaged if we reason on the basis of our pre-existing beliefs. This is one reason that stereotypes form”. [Do remember on a related note that stereotype accuracy is one of the largest and most replicable effects in all of social psychology – US].

“Some gestures have almost universal meaning, like waving goodbye. Babies begin using gestures like this quite early on. Between 10 and 18 months of age, gestures become frequent and are used extensively for communication. […] After around 18 months, the use of gesture starts declining, as vocalization becomes more and more dominant in communication. […] By [that time], most children are entering the two-word stage, when they become able to combine words. […] At this age, children often use a word that they know to refer to many different entities whose names are not yet known. They might use the word ‘bee’ for insects that are not bees, or the word ‘dog’ to refer to horses and cows. Experiments have shown that this is not a semantic confusion. Toddlers do not think that horses and cows are a type of dog. Rather, they have limited language capacities, and so they stretch their limited vocabularies to communicate as flexibly as possible. […] there is a lot of similarity across cultures at the two-word stage regarding which words are combined. Young children combine words to draw attention to objects (‘See doggie!’), to indicate ownership (‘My shoe’), to point out properties of objects (‘Big doggie’), to indicate plurality (‘Two cookie’), and to indicate recurrence (‘Other cookie’). […] It is only as children learn grammar that some divergence is found across languages. This is probably because different languages have different grammatical formats for combining words. […] grammatical learning emerges naturally from extensive language experience (of the utterances of others) and from language use (the novel utterances of the child, which are re-formulated by conversational partners if they are grammatically incorrect).”

“The social and communicative functions of language, and children’s understanding of them, are captured by pragmatics. […] pragmatic aspects of conversation include taking turns, and making sure that the other person has sufficient knowledge of the events being discussed to follow what you are saying. […] To learn about pragmatics, children need to go beyond the literal meaning of the words and make inferences about communicative intent. A conversation is successful when a child has recognized the type of social situation and applied the appropriate formula. […] Children with autism, who have difficulties with social cognition and in reading the mental states of others, find learning the pragmatics of conversation particularly difficult. […] Children with autism often show profound delays in social understanding and do not ‘get’ many social norms. These children may behave quite inappropriately in social settings […] Children with autism may also show very delayed understanding of emotions and of intentions. However, this does not make them anti-social, rather it makes them relatively ineffective at being pro-social.”

“When children have siblings, there are usually developmental advantages for social cognition and psychological understanding. […] Discussing the causes of disputes appears to be particularly important for developing social understanding. Young children need opportunities to ask questions, argue with explanations, and reflect on why other people behave in the way that they do. […] Families that do not talk about the intentions and emotions of others and that do not explicitly discuss social norms will create children with reduced social understanding.”

“[C]hildren, like adults, are more likely to act in pro-social ways to ingroup members. […] Social learning of cultural ‘ingroups’ appears to develop early in children as part of general socio-moral development. […] being loyal to one’s ‘ingroup’ is likely to make the child more popular with the other members of that group. Being in a group thus requires the development of knowledge about how to be loyal, about conforming to pressure and about showing ingroup bias. For example, children may need to make fine judgements about who is more popular within the group, so that they can favour friends who are more likely to be popular with the rest of the group. […] even children as young as 6 years will show more positive responding to the transgression of social rules by ingroup members compared to outgroup members, particularly if they have relatively well-developed understanding of emotions and intentions.”

“Good language skills improve memory, because children with better language skills are able to construct narratively coherent and extended, temporally organized representations of experienced events.”

“Once children begin reading, […] letter-sound knowledge and ‘phonemic awareness’ (the ability to divide words into the single sound elements represented by letters) become the most important predictors of reading development. […] phonemic awareness largely develops as a consequence of being taught to read and write. Research shows that illiterate adults do not have phonemic awareness. […] brain imaging shows that learning to read ‘re-maps’ phonology in the brain. We begin to hear words as sequences of ‘phonemes’ only after we learn to read.”

October 29, 2017 Posted by | Books, Language, Neurology, Psychology | Leave a comment

Words

Almost all of the words below are words which I encountered while reading the novels Flashman and the Tiger, Flashman in the Great Game, Bellwether, and Storm Front.

Cavil. Thimblerig(/ger). Garboil. Gamine. Teetotum. Burgess. Clart. Wangle. Arrack. Surpassingly. Understrapper. Quince. Fiacre. Hackney. Furbelow. Fritillary. Dormer. Haddock. Chamois. Tizzy.

Claver. Aporia. Tyke. Clype. Gowk. Billycock. Mottle. Welkin. Hayrick. Ablution. Flanker. Baize. Assegai. Inspan. Knobkerrie. Cutty. Leek. Guttering. Costermonger. Kohl.

Genteel. Plenipotentiary. Trice. Tinker. Chapati. Clack. Rowan. Bracken. Tapster. Bosh. Durbar. Krait. Dacoit. Kepi. Ghat. Waler. Hackery. Bun-fight. Flapper. Wale.

Bellwether. Bouffant. Rumple. Snit. Dashiki. Puce. Shearling. Pinafore. Marcel. Cerulean. Wreaths. Planchette. Moxie. Gawky. Ichor. Thrum. Hibachi. Wain. Ecumene. Fricative.

 

October 26, 2017 Posted by | Books, Language | Leave a comment

Words

Most of the words below are words which I encountered while reading Flashman and the Angel of the Lord and Flashman on the March.

Guerdon. Frowst. Dunnage. Veldt. Whelk. Tup. Gannet. Hawser. Doss-house. Brogue. Tucker. Voluptuary. Morion. Flawn. Ague. Fusee/Fuzee. Jimp. Anent. Skein. Fob.

Arbitrament. Whiffler. Abide. Beldam. Schiltron. Pickaninny/piccaninny. Gird/girt. Despond. Whittling. Glim. Peignoir. Gamp. Connubial. Ensconce. Confab. Trestle. Squawl. Paterfamilias. Dabble. Peal.

Buff. Duenna. Yawl. Palaver. Lateen. Felucca. Coracle. Gimlet. Tippet. Toggery. Dry-gulch. Nuncheon. Lovelock. Josser. Casque. Withy. Weir. Sonsy. Guzzle. Hearty.

Rattle. Pippin. Trencherman. Potation. Bilbo. Burly. Haulier. Roundelay. Lych-gate. Skilligalee/skilly. Labial. Dudgeon. Caravanserai. Mithridatism. Avast. Lagniappe. Thigmotaxis. Afforesting. Immiseration. Chamberlain.

October 11, 2017 Posted by | Books, Language | Leave a comment

Words

The words below are words which I encountered while reading the Rex Stout novels The Broken Vase, Double for Death, The Sound of Murder, Mountain Cat, and the Flashman/Fraser novels Flashman and the Dragon & Flashman at the Charge.

Asperity. Tantalus. Whizbang. Hammy. Regnant. Mordacity. Blotter. Quietus. Debouch. Acidulous. Aniline. Prolegomenon. Suasion. Spoor. Mangy. Clematis. Whittle. Palmistry. Carnality. Clangor.

Cerise. Coruscation. Fluster. Conviviality. Interstice. Chirography. Dub. Grubstake. Pilaster. Sagebrush. Pronghorn. Prognathous. Greensward. Palomino. Spelter. Puggle. Lorcha. Kampilan. Caulk. Cherub.

Thew. Effulgence. Poppet. Colander. Brolly. Bund. Pennon. Cove. Lamasery. Lamé. Patter. Gibber. Snickersnee. Blub. Beckon. Tog. Inveigle. Fuddle. Spoony. Roué.

Equerry. Gazette. Rig-out. Lashing. Clamber. Wainscot. Saunter. Tootle. Latterly. Serge. Redoubt. Charabanc. Indaba. Cess. Gotch. Bailiwick. Reveler. Exult. Hawse. Recreant.

September 27, 2017 Posted by | Books, Language | Leave a comment

Words

Most of the words below are words which I encountered while reading the Rex Stout books: Too Many Clients, The Final Deduction, Homicide Trinity, Gambit, The Mother Hunt, Trio for Blunt Instruments, A Right to Die, The Doorbell Rang, Death of a Doxy, The Father Hunt, Death of a Dude, Please Pass the Guilt, A Family Affair, Death Times Three, and Red Threads.

Commissure. Nonfeasance. Bodice. Binnacle. Episiotomy. Amplexus. Bayou. Jetty. Crisper. Conurbation. Splotch. Tarradiddle. Lamia. Prink/primp. Thaumaturgy/thaumaturge. Allspice. Panjandrum. Subdulous. Overweening. Perspicacity.

Jejune. Hamper. Cloche. Ulster. Bevel. Auto-da-fé. Buckram. Peccant. Fatuity. Dissension. Chipper. Analeptic. Cluck. Moll. Posy. Peeve. Wrangle. Chervil. Wile. Vim.

Huffy. Callow. Crabby. Locution. Scrapple. Jamb. Cockatrice. Wink. Spatter. Sororicide. Discomfiture. Diphthong. Twaddle. Rassle. Headcheese. Flimflam. Brioche. Doxy. Mooch. Incumbency.

Cogitable. Punctilio. Mantic. Frowzy. Burgoo. Boodle. Toplofty. Ell. Slue. Fulcrum. Piffle. Amphigoric. Subreption. Cynosure. ConcupiscenceCarceral. Descant. Pretermit. Hickory. Ingénue.

September 13, 2017 Posted by | Books, Language | Leave a comment

First Farmers (I?)

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(link)

This year I have so far read 113 books and I have added 5 of those books to my list of favourite books on goodreads. I have mentioned Herriot here on the blog despite the fact that this type of book is not really the type of book I usually blog, and I blogged Yashin et al.‘s biodemography text in a decent amount of detail. I have posted a couple of posts about Horowitz and Samsom’s book and I intend to blog that book in more detail later this week. However there are a few great non-fiction books which I’ve read this year which I have not yet blogged at all, including Boyd and Richerson and the excellent book by Bellwood to which the title of this post refers. These books have one thing in common: They are ‘paper books’, not books stored in an electronic format, which means that blogging them take more time than is ideal. The extra amount of time it takes to blog paper books makes it hard for me to justify blogging such books in general, even books I think are great.

Aside from the time expenditure there are at least two other major problems I have with justifying blogging such books. One problem is that this blog is not really the proper place for me to recommend books to others, a state of affairs of which I am well aware. I sometimes do it anyway, but I know perfectly well that very few people will ever know or care that I liked a particular book if I write about that book here. If I actually wanted others to know about books like these there would be lots of other channels of communication much better suited for such purposes; such as e.g. the comment sections of large blogs/reddit threads/etc. To a first approximation nobody reads this blog, which is the way I like it. The other major problem – in the context of me justifying to myself blogging such books – is that I actually usually spend quite a bit of effort while reading such (paper) books, e.g. in the form of note taking and highlighting. A major reason I have for blogging non-fiction books is that blogging books means that the content therein gets processed a few extra times, which helps aid recall and understanding. This incidentally goes both for the stuff that eventually finds its way into these posts, and to some extent also for the content that does not. When I’m reading paper books I tend to do a lot of this work while actively reading the books. Part of the reason why is actually precisely due to the fact that I know from experience that these kinds of books are bothersome to blog; if I know beforehand that I’m not particularly likely to blog a book I’ll usually spend a bit more time and effort while reading it. That extra amount of work of course makes me even less likely to end up blogging the book eventually; at some point diminishing marginal returns really kick in.

One take-away from all of the above is, I guess, that if you’re one of those three-four(?) people who semi-regularly read my blog and you also happen to actually care about which books I like and recommend, you should keep in mind that some of the really great books I read may end up not being covered here in ‘classical book posts’, simply because blogging great books may sometimes simply be too much work to justify the effort; and those books you may spot quite easily by having an occasional look at my book collection posts (see the sidebar) or my goodreads favourites.

What made me decide to finally write this post was that I had been considering whether or not to write a post about Tainter’s The Collapse of Complex Societies, which I didn’t really like all that much. While thinking about this stuff I realized that it would frankly be madness for me to cover that book (also a paper book) here before I’d at least talked a bit about Boyd and Richerson and Bellwood’s books, as those books are just much better and more interesting. And then I concluded that I really ought to cover Bellwood …and here we are.

I’ve read about some of the topics Bellwood covers elsewhere, e.g. here, here, and here, but the other works I’ve read on these topics have not covered the topics Bellwood covers in the amount of detail he does (if at all); one of the reasons why I really enjoyed Bellwood’s book was that it covers in a great amount of detail precisely some of the questions I’ve been asking myself while reading other works on related topics. The book covers things I had been looking for elsewhere, but hadn’t been able to find. This admittedly mainly relates to the agriculture and archaeology parts, rather than the linguistics part, but the linguistics is interesting as well.

If you’re interested in the origins of agriculture, this book is a must-read.

Below I’ve added some quotes from the book, as well as a few comments.

“This book suggests that major episodes of human movement occurred from time to time, in various parts of the world, as different populations developed or adopted agriculture and then spread farming, languages, and genes, in some cases across vast distances. […] In order to approach what often appears to be a debate in which specialists all talk past each other, concerned only with data from their own discipline, this book is framed around a fairly simple multidisciplinary hypothesis. The early farming dispersal hypothesis postulates that the spreads of early farming lifestyles were often correlated with prehistoric episodes of human population and language dispersal from agricultural homelands. The present-day distribution of language families and racially varied populations across the globe, allowing for the known reassortments that have ensued in historical times, still reflect to a high degree those early dispersals. […] [However] the early farming dispersal hypothesis is not claiming that only farmers ever dispersed into new lands or established language families in prehistory. Hunter-gatherers feature widely in this book since their lifestyle, in terms of long-term stability and reliability, has been the most successful in human history. It fueled the initial human colonization of the whole world, apart from a number of oceanic islands.”

“We have clear signs of relatively independent agricultural origins in western Asia, central China, the New Guinea highlands, Mesoamerica, the central Andes, the Mississippi basin, and possibly western Africa and southern India. These developments occurred at many different times between about 12,000 and 4,000 years ago. The agricultural systems concerned spread at remarkably different rates – some quickly, some slowly, some hardly at all.”

“This book owes its origin to a consideration of two primary observations: 1. Prior to the era of European colonization there existed (and still exist) a number of very widespread families of languages, the term “family” in this sense meaning that the languages concerned share common ancestry, having diverged from a common forebear […]. These language families exist because they have spread in some way from homeland regions, not because they have converged in place out of hundreds of formerly unrelated languages. 2. Within the early agricultural past of mankind there have existed many widespread archaeological complexes of closely linked artifactual style, shared economic basis, and relatively short-lived temporal placement. […] Again, these spreads have occurred from homeland regions, and most such complexes tend to become younger as one moves away from regions of agricultural origin […]. Most importantly, many agricultural homelands overlap geographically with major language family homelands, in highly significant ways.”

“The expansions of early farming populations that form the subject matter of this book reflect two consecutive processes: 1. the periodic genesis of new cultural (archaeological) or linguistic configurations in homeland circumstances; 2. the dispersal of such configurations into surrounding regions […] The transformations within such configurations, both during and after dispersal, can occur via adaptive or chance modifications to the inherited pattern (thus giving relationships of descent, or phylogeny), or via interactions with other contemporary human populations, including culturally and linguistically related as well as unrelated groups (thus giving rise to a process termed reticulation). […] One of the suggestions that will dominate the chapters in this book is that short bursts, or “punctuations,” of dispersal by closely related populations over very large areas have occurred from time to time in human prehistory, especially following the regional beginnings of agriculture or the acquisitions of some other material, demographic, or ideological advantages. Punctuations also occurred when humans first entered regions previously uninhabited, such as Australia, the Americas, and the Pacific Islands. These bursts have actually occupied very little of the total time span of human history. Often their effects are confusingly hidden beneath the reticulate interactive networks that have linked varied populations through the long millenia of subsequent history. But their underlying impact on the course of human history and on the generation of subsequent patterns of human diversity have been immense.”

“Many hunters and gatherers of the etnographic record have resource management skills that can mimic agriculture, and some have even adopted minor forms of casual cultivation. […] Resource management […] can be defined as any technique that propagates, tends, or protects a species, reduces competition, prolongs or increases the harvest, insures the appearance of a species at a particular time in a particular place, extends the range of or otherwise modifies the nature, distribution, and density of a species […]. Resource management is not synonymous with agriculture or cultivation and it has obviously been practiced to some degree by all plant and animal exploiters since long before agriculture began. Cultivation, an essential component of any agricultural system, defines a sequence of human activity whereby crops are planted […], protected, harvested, then deliberately sown again […] Domesticated plants […] are those that show recognizable indications of morphological change away from the wild phenotype, attributable to human interference in the genotype through cultivation […] For animals, the concept of domestication is invoked when there are relatively undisputed signs of human control and breeding of a species. Such signs can normally be claimed in situations where animals were transported out of their homeland regions […] In putative homeland areas for such animals, especially where there was exploitation of wild ancestral species in pre-agricultural times, it can often be difficult to distinguish animal husbandry from hunting in early agricultural contexts. […] the term agriculture will be used to apply in a general sense to all activities involving cultivation and domestication of plants.”

“In general, whereas a family of hunters and gatherers might need several square kilometers of territory for subsistence, an average family of shifting cultivators will be able to get by with a few hectares of crop-producing land. A family of irrigation agriculturalists will normally be able to manage with less than one hectare. Thus, along the scale of increasing intensification of production, less land is needed to feed a standard unit such as a family or individual. […] The reason why agriculturalists can live at much higher densities than hunters and collectors is because food is produced, on average, more intensively per unit of exploited area. Food-collecting mothers also tend to space births more widely than sedentary cultivators for reasons believed to relate in part to factors of mobility and diet2, leading in combination to biologically reduced frequencies of conception. This form of birth control maximizes the number of hunter-gatherer children able to survive to adulthood, but keeps the overall populations small.”

“With the Holocene amelioration of climate to conditions like those of the present, a rapid change that occurred about 11,500 years ago, the world’s climates became warmer, wetter, and a good deal more reliable on a short term basis […] It was this reliability that gave the early edge to farming […] Holocene climate was clearly the ultimate enabler of early farming, but it was not the proximate cause behind individual transitions. [The importance of climate was also emphasized in Boyd and RichersonUS.] […] A combined explanation of affluence alternating with mild environmental stress, especially in “risky” but highly productive early Holocene environments with periodic fluctuations in food supplies, is becoming widely favored by many archaeologists today as one explanation for the shift to early agriculture. […] It is necessary […] to emphasize that the regional beginnings of agriculture must have involved such a complex range of variables that we would be blind to ignore any of the above factors – prior sedentism, affluence and choice, human-plant co-evolution, environmental change and periodic stress, population pressure, and certainly the availability of suitable candidates for domestication. […] most suggested “causes” overlap so greatly that it is often hard to separate them. […] there can be no one-line explanation for the origins of agriculture.”

“[M]any recent hunter-gatherers have been observed to modify their environments to some degree to encourage food yields, whether by burning, replanting, water diversion, or keeping of decoy animals or domesticated dogs […] Most agriculturalists also hunt if the opportunity is presented and always have done so throughout the archaeological record. […] there is good evidence in recent societies for some degree of overlap between food collection and food production. But the whole issue here revolves around just what level of “food production” is implied. […] any idea that mobile hunters and gatherers can just shift in and out of agricultural (or pastoral) dependent lifestyle at will seems unrealistic in terms of the major scheduling shifts required by the annual calendars of resource availability, movement, and activity associated with the two basic modes of production. There are very few hints of such circumstances ever occurring in the ethnographic record […] Mobile foragers must give an increasing commitment to sedentism if agriculture is to become a successful mainstay of their economy […] In general for the Old World, we see that hunters and gatherers may practice a small amount of agriculture, and agriculturalists may practice a small amount of hunting and gathering, but the two modes of production most decisively do not merge or reveal a gentle cline. […] both Old and New World populations evidently found it problematic to shift in and out of agricultural dependence on a regular basis.”

“In order to approach the ethnographic record systematically and to extract useful comparative information, it is essential not to treat all recorded ethnographic hunter-gatherer societies as being one simple category, or as having had the same basic historical trajectories stretching back far into the Pleistocene past […] Hunter-gatherers have had histories just as tumultuous in many cases as have agriculturalists”.

Bellwood favours in his coverage of this topic a model with three different groups of hunter-gatherers. I’m not sure ‘favours’ is the right word; perhaps it’d be more accurate to state that he uses such a model to illustrate one of the ways in which different groups of hunters and gatherers are dissimilar, and why overlooking such dissimilarities may be problematic. In the model he presents in the book one group of hunter-gatherers consists of hunter-gatherers who live/d in close proximity to agricultural societies. These people tend to live in marginal areas where it’s hard to make agriculture work and they tend to be surrounded by agriculturalists (‘encapsulation’). Many places where you’d encounter such people, what you’d see/saw is/would be some sort of established exchange system, where farmers trade/d e.g. cereals in exchange for e.g. meat procured by the hunter-gatherers. One thing to always keep in mind here is that although long-term the hunter-gatherers were displaced and circumscribed by agricultural societies far from all interactions between these groups were hostile; mutually beneficial arrangements could be arrived at, even if they might not have been stable long-term. A related point is that hunter-gathering was probably a much more attractive option in the past than it is today, as the encapsulation process was not nearly so far advanced as it is today; they had better land, and despite not being farmers they might still benefit from the activities of some of those farmers who lived nearby. Bellwood is of course very interested in why agriculture spread originally, and he mentions in this context that although some such circumscribed hunter-gatherer societies may adopt agriculture eventually, such hunter-gatherer societies are not the place to look if you’re interested in the question of how agriculture originally spread throughout the world – which seems very reasonable to me. As he puts it in the notes, “while low-level food production can exist in theory, my feeling is that it has always been a child of marginal environments, where farmers necessarily retracted into food collection or where foragers were able to invest in minor cultivation without too much competition from other farmers. Such societies represent the ends, rather than the sources, of historical trajectories of agricultural expansion.”

The second group in Bellwood’s hunter-gatherer ‘model’ are ‘unenclosed’ hunter-gatherers. A few quotes:

“This group comprises those hunter-gatherers who inhabited agricultural latitudes in Australia, the Andaman Islands, and many regions of North America, especially in West Coast and Florida, but who (unlike the members of group 1) lived lives generally apart from farmers prior to European colonization. Many of these societies in North America lived in coastal regions with prolific maritime resources […] Some were also in periodic but non-threatening contact with farmers in adjacent regions in prehistory and thus had opportunities, never taken, to adopt agriculture […] Socially, […] such groups overlapped greatly with agriculturalists, indicating that social complexity of the chiefdom type can relate in terms of origin more to the intensity and reliability of resources and population density than to any simple presence of food production as opposed to hunting and gathering. […] The ranked and populous hunter-gatherer societies of norther California were no more interested in adopting agriculture than were Cape York Aborigines or the Semang, and perhaps even the majority of hunter-gatherers in prehistory. It does not follow that hunter-gatherers who have “complex” social institutions will necessarily become farmers whenever they are introduced to the farming concept.”

The third group in Bellwood’s model was really interesting to me, as it’s a group I’d previously wanted to read about and find quite fascinating. This is hunter-gatherers who used to be agriculturalists, i.e. former agriculturalists who later ‘reverted’ to hunter-gathering for one reason or another. A few quotes:

“Some hunter-gatherers appear to have descended from original farming or pastoralist societies, via specializations into environments where agriculture was not possible or decidedly marginal. Some also exist in direct contact with agriculturalist groups closely related in terms of cultural and biological ancestry. […] Some of the rain-forest hunters and gatherers of Island Southeast Asia […] descend from original agricultural populations, if the linguistic and biological data are any guide.16 In this view, the ancestral Punan and Kubu became hunter-gatherers, especially wild sago collectors in the case of the Punan, via conscious decisions to move into interfluvial rain-forest hunting and gathering in regions that riverine agriculturalists found hard to penetrate. Other hunter-gatherers descended from cultivators include some Bantu speakers in southern Africa, possibly the honey-collecting Dorobo or Okiek of the Kenyan Highlands of East Africa, probably [as he notes elsewhere, “this is a difficult group to deal with in terms of authentication”] some marginal sago-collecting groups […] in the Sepik basin of New Guinea, and some Indian groups such as the Chenchu and Birhor. […] the Numic-speaking Uto-Aztecan peoples of the Great Basin and adjacent areas […] appear to have abandoned a former agricultural lifestyle around 1,000 years ago. These people, linguistic descendants of original maize-cultivators in Mexico and the Southwest, eventually found themselves in a dry region where maize agriculture had become marginal or no longer possible [Joseph Tainter covers the collapse of the ‘Chacoans’ in some detail in his book – US] […] Group 3 hunter-gatherer societies are of especial interest because it is far easier for a relatively marginal food-producing community to turn to hunting and gathering than it is for hunters and gatherers to move in the opposite direction. Thus, it is a fair expectation that members of this third group of hunter-gatherers will always have been quite numerous, particularly around the ecological margins of expanding agricultural societies. […] the group 3 societies offer one trajectory of cultural evolution that can terminate for ever the idea that evolution from foraging to farming is a one-way street.”

“[I]t is certainly not being suggested here that ancient hunter-gatherers could never have adopted agriculture from outside sources. But they would only have been likely to do so in situations where they had some demographic or environmental advantage over any farmers in the vicinity, and where there would have been significant reasons why the normal hunter-gatherer disinterest in agricultural adoptions should be overturned. We cannot assume that hunter-gatherers would automatically adopt agriculture just because it was sitting under their noses. We also need to remember that many populations of hunters and gatherers survived alongside agriculturalists in many parts of the world for millenia, without adopting agriculture […] The following chapters will demonstrate that the spread of agriculture in the past could not simply have occurred only because hunter-gatherers everywhere adopted it. Agriculture spread in Neolithic/Formative circumstances mainly because the cultural and linguistic descendants of the early cultivators increased their demographic profiles and pushed their cultural and linguistic boundaries outwards.”

September 7, 2017 Posted by | Anthropology, Archaeology, Books, Language, Personal | Leave a comment

A few diabetes papers of interest

i. Eating Disorders in Girls and Women With Type 1 Diabetes: A Longitudinal Study of Prevalence, Onset, Remission, and Recurrence.

If these results can be trusted, then the prevalence of eating disorders in young female diabetics is disturbingly high. Some quotes:

“The prevalence, clinical characteristics, and medical consequences of disturbed eating behavior (DEB) and eating disorders (EDs) in individuals with type 1 diabetes has received increasing attention since case reports of this dangerous combination were first published in the 1980s (1,2). Although the specificity of this association was initially unclear, systematic research has demonstrated that teenage girls and women with type 1 diabetes are at significantly increased risk of DEB compared with their nondiabetic peers (3). Such DEB includes dieting, fasting, binge-eating, and a range of compensatory and purging behaviors that can directly interfere with optimal diabetes management. […] Deliberately underdosing or omitting insulin to induce hyperglycemia and loss of glucose in the urine, and thereby control weight, is a unique purging behavior to control weight that is available to individuals with type 1 diabetes (4). This is an important mediator of the association of DEB and EDs with poorer metabolic control (5,6) and contributes to an increased risk of a range of short-term and long-term diabetes-related medical complications. These include abnormal lipid profiles (7), diabetic ketoacidosis (6), retinopathy (8), neuropathy (9), and nephropathy (10), as well as higher than expected mortality (11).”

“Bryden et al. (13) assessed a group of individuals with type 1 diabetes in adolescence and then again in early adulthood. […] They found EDs or other significant eating problems in 26% of participants, as well as significant associations between eating problems, insulin misuse, and microvascular complications (14). Goebel-Fabbri et al. (15) assessed 234 adult women with type 1 diabetes twice over an 11-year period. They found insulin omission for weight control to be very common (reported by 30% at baseline). Insulin omission frequently persisted over the lengthy follow-up period and was associated with higher rates of diabetes-related medical complications and tripled risk of mortality.”

“This study describes the longitudinal course of disturbed eating behavior (DEB) and EDs in a cohort with type 1 diabetes. […] A total of 126 girls with type 1 diabetes receiving care for diabetes at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto participated in a series of seven interview-based assessments of ED behavior and psychopathology over a 14-year period, beginning in late childhood. […] Mean age was 11.8 ± 1.5 years at time 1 and 23.7 ± 2.1 years at time 7. At time 7, 32.4% (23/71) met the criteria for a current ED, and an additional 8.5% (6/71) had a subthreshold ED. Mean age at ED onset (full syndrome or below the threshold) was 22.6 years (95% CI 21.6–23.5), and the cumulative probability of onset was 60% by age 25 years. […] The average time between remission of ED and subsequent recurrence was 6.5 years (95% CI 4.4–8.6), and the cumulative probability of recurrence was 53% by 6 years after remission.”

“In this longitudinal study, EDs were common and persistent, and new onset of ED was documented well into adulthood. […] [The] rates provide evidence that disordered eating is a common and serious concern among girls and young women with type 1 diabetes. Although adolescent and adult women in the general population also frequently report dieting, rates of more extreme weight loss behaviors and clinical eating disorders tend to be lower than those that occurred in this study (22,2830). […] The point prevalence for DEB and ED continued to increase across the study, largely because of marked increases in reported insulin omission for weight loss. Of particular concern, insulin omission as a weight control method was reported by 27% of participants at time 7. This dangerous method of purging directly compromises metabolic control and confers both short-term and long-term medical risk. Other researchers found it to be highly persistent among adult women with type 1 diabetes and associated with increased morbidity and mortality (10,15). […] In this study, both DEB and EDs tended to be persistent, with a mean time from observed onset to detected remission of 6.0 and 4.3 years, respectively, and significant estimated risk of recurrence among those whose eating disturbances initially remitted. […] The high prevalence of DEB and EDs among women with type 1 diabetes, in addition to high incidence of new ED cases continuing into the young adult years, suggests that sustained efforts at prevention, detection, and treatment of eating disturbances are needed across the adolescent and young adult years among women with type 1 diabetes.”

ii. Excess Risk of Dying From Infectious Causes in Those With Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes.

“Individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes are widely considered to be more prone to infections than those without diabetes (1). […] The underlying pathology for an increased risk of infections among people with diabetes is not fully elucidated and is probably multifactorial. However, there are some data to suggest that it could, in part, relate to a compromised immune system. Short- and long-term hyperglycemia may disturb immune functions such as neutrophil bactericidal function (13), cellular immunity (14), and complement activation (15). These defects in the immune system, along with vascular insufficiency, render patients with diabetes at higher risk for a variety of severe or invasive infections compared with those without diabetes (16).”

“While there is a reasonably good understanding of the biological link between diabetes and infection, there are few data quantifying the excess risk of acquiring an infection or dying from infections associated with diabetes. […] the objective of this study was to examine the excess risk of death from several infectious causes in those with type 1 and type 2 diabetes compared with the general population and to see if this excess risk differs by age and over time. […] A total of 1,108,982 individuals with diabetes who were registered with the Australian Diabetes register between 2000 and 2010 were linked to the National Death Index. Mortality outcomes were defined as infection-relatedA-B death (ICD codes A99–B99), pneumonia (J12–J189), septicemia (A40 and A41), and osteomyelitis (M86). […] During a median follow-up of 6.7 years, there were 2,891, 2,158, 1,248, and 147 deaths from infection-relatedA-B causes, pneumonia, septicemia, or osteomyelitis, respectively. Crude mortality rates from infectionsA-B were 0.147 and 0.431 per 1,000 person-years in type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were higher in type 1 and type 2 diabetes for all outcomes after adjustment for age and sex. For infection-relatedA-B mortality, SMRs were 4.42 (95% CI 3.68–5.34) and 1.47 (1.42–1.53) for type 1 and type 2 diabetes (P < 0.001), respectively. For pneumonia in type 1 diabetes, SMRs were approximately 5 and 6 in males and females, respectively, while the excess risk was ∼20% for type 2 (both sexes). For septicemia, SMRs were approximately 10 and 2 for type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively, and similar by sex. For osteomyelitis in type 1 diabetes, SMRs were 16 and 58 in males and females, respectively, and ∼3 for type 2 diabetes (both sexes).”

“This prospective study of more than one million people with diabetes provides evidence that individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes are more likely to die of infection-related death, in particular death due to pneumonia, septicemia, and osteomyelitis, compared with the general population. These data show that infection in those with diabetes is an important cause of mortality. […] the increased risk appears to be greater for type 1 than type 2 diabetes. […] Patients with diabetes have a higher case fatality from infections than those without diabetes (17,30), which is both due to altered host immunity and due to having a higher prevalence of comorbidities, which places them at increased risk of death.”

iii. Effects of Acute Hypoglycemia on Working Memory and Language Processing in Adults With and Without Type 1 Diabetes.

“Cognitive function is impaired during acute hypoglycemia and frequently affects people with type 1 diabetes (1,2); elucidation of which cognitive domains are affected and by how much is of practical importance. Although cognitive domains do not function independently of each other, it is pertinent to design studies that investigate how everyday activities are affected by hypoglycemia as this has direct relevance to people with diabetes. Previous studies have demonstrated the effects of hypoglycemia on specific cognitive domains, including memory, attention, nonverbal intelligence, visual and auditory information processing, psychomotor function, spatial awareness, and executive functioning (314). However, the effects of hypoglycemia on language processing have seldom been explored.”

“Slurred speech and language difficulties are recognized features of hypoglycemia, but to our knowledge, the effects of hypoglycemia on linguistic processing have not been studied systematically. The current study used transient insulin-induced hypoglycemia in adults with and without type 1 diabetes to examine its effects on three aspects of language: the relationship between working memory and language (reading span), grammatical decoding (self-paced reading), and grammatical encoding (producing subject-verb agreement). Tests of these issues have been used extensively to understand the nature of language processing and its relationship to other cognitive abilities, specifically working memory (17).”

“Forty adults were studied (20 with type 1 diabetes and 20 healthy volunteers) using a hyperinsulinemic glucose clamp to lower blood glucose to 2.5 mmol/L (45 mg/dL) (hypoglycemia) for 60 min, or to maintain blood glucose at 4.5 mmol/L (81 mg/dL) (euglycemia), on separate occasions. Language tests were applied to assess the effects of hypoglycemia on the relationship between working memory and language (reading span), grammatical decoding (self-paced reading), and grammatical encoding (subject-verb agreement). […] Hypoglycemia caused a significant deterioration in reading span (P < 0.001; η2 = 0.37; Cohen d = 0.65) and a fall in correct responses (P = 0.005; η2 = 0.19; Cohen d = 0.41). On the self-paced reading test, the reading time for the first sentence fragment increased during hypoglycemia (P = 0.039; η2 = 0.11; Cohen d = 0.25). […] Hypoglycemia caused a deterioration of subject-verb agreement (correct responses: P = 0.011; η2 = 0.159; Cohen d = 0.31).”

“[We] demonstrated a significant deterioration in the accuracy of subject-verb agreement and also in reading span, a measure of working memory. This latter finding is compatible with the results of a previous study by our group (14) that used a different cognitive test battery but had an identical study design. In the current study, performance in the TMB and DST was significantly impaired during hypoglycemia, consistent with previous observations (57,1012,24) and confirming that adequate hypoglycemia had been achieved to impair cognitive function. […] Different mental functions have been shown to vary in their sensitivity to neuroglycopenia. […] higher-level skills are more vulnerable to hypoglycemia than simple cognitive tasks (1). In addition, during hypoglycemia, speed is usually killed in order to preserve accuracy (1). […] results strongly suggest that hypoglycemia induces difficulties in seemingly easy linguistic tasks such as correctly reading aloud a simple sentence fragment and its completion. Compared with other clamp studies exploring the effects of hypoglycemia on cognitive function, this was a large study that recruited both participants with and participants without diabetes. The fact that similar results were obtained in both groups suggests that these effects on language relate to acute hypoglycemia rather than to a chronic alternation of glycemic status in diabetes.” [My bold – US. These observations seem to corroborate observations I’ve made myself in the past.]

iv. Current State of Type 1 Diabetes Treatment in the U.S.: Updated Data From the T1D Exchange Clinic Registry.

Figure 1 from this paper is the sort of image which is worth a 1000 words.

Some observations from the paper:

“Data from 16,061 participants updated between 1 September 2013 and 1 December 2014 were compared with registry enrollment data collected from 1 September 2010 to 1 August 2012. […] The overall average HbA1c was 8.2% (66 mmol/mol) at enrollment and 8.4% (68 mmol/mol) at the most recent update. During childhood, mean HbA1c decreased from 8.3% (67 mmol/mol) in 2–4-year-olds to 8.1% (65 mmol/mol) at 7 years of age, followed by an increase to 9.2% (77 mmol/mol) in 19-year-olds. Subsequently, mean HbA1c values decline gradually until ∼30 years of age, plateauing at 7.5–7.8% (58–62 mmol/mol) beyond age 30 until a modest drop in HbA1c below 7.5% (58 mmol/mol) in those 65 years of age. Severe hypoglycemia (SH) and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) remain all too common complications of treatment, especially in older (SH) and younger patients (DKA). […] Although the T1D Exchange registry findings are not population based and could be biased, it is clear that there remains considerable room for improving outcomes of treatment of type 1 diabetes across all age-groups.”

“[M]ean HbA1c values showed a gradual decline until ∼30 years of age, plateauing at a level of 7.5–7.8% (58–62 mmol/mol) beyond age 30 until a modest drop in HbA1c below 7.5% (58 mmol/mol) after 65 years of age. The ADA HbA1c goal of <7.5% (58 mmol/mol) was achieved by only a small percentage of children and adolescents <18 years of age (17–23%), and even fewer 18–25-year-olds (14%) met the ADA goal for adults of <7.0% (53 mmol/mol); this percentage increased to ∼30% in older adults […] across all age-groups, HbA1c was highest among non-Hispanic black participants, participants with lower annual household income, and those who performed SMBG less than four times per day […] On average, participants using an insulin pump or continuous glucose monitor tended to have lower HbA1c values [….] Among the subset of 2,561 participants who completed the participant questionnaire, 6% reported having had a seizure or loss of consciousness due to hypoglycemia in the prior 3 months, with the highest occurrence being among those who were 50 years old or older.”

“The most troubling aspect of the data is that the mean HbA1c level of 9.0% (75 mmol/mol) in 13–17-year-olds in the registry is only slightly lower than the 9.5% (80 mmol/mol) seen in 13–17-year-olds at the start of the DCCT in the 1980s (15). Clearly, advances in diabetes management over the past two decades have been less successful in overcoming the special challenges in managing teenagers than adults with type 1 diabetes. Our data also indicate that the majority of “emerging adults” in their 20s do not fully emerge with regard to glycemic control until they reach 30 years of age. […] In a cross-sectional comparison, the average HbA1c at the most recent update was higher than at enrollment (8.4 vs. 8.2% [68 vs. 66 mmol/mol]), suggesting a worsening in glycemic control over time. The greatest increase in HbA1c was observed in the 13–17 (9.0 vs. 8.7% [75 vs. 72 mmol/mol]) and 18–26-year-old (8.7 vs. 8.3% [72 vs. 67 mmol/mol]) groups. Although this could reflect differences in age and type 1 diabetes duration, the results nevertheless indicate that there certainly is no indication of improving glycemic control in these age-groups.”

v. Prevention and Reversal of Type 1 Diabetes — Past Challenges and Future Opportunities.

“Over the past three decades there have been a number of clinical trials directed at interdicting the type 1 diabetes (T1D) disease process in an attempt to prevent the development of the disease in those at increased risk or to stabilize — potentially even reverse — the disease in people with T1D, usually of recent onset. Unfortunately, to date there has been no prevention trial that has resulted in delay or prevention of T1D. […] Since the completion of the early trials, particularly during the past decade, a number of additional randomized, double-masked, adequately powered, controlled clinical trials have been conducted using many different immunological strategies. For the most part, these have been disappointing, with none showing unambiguous benefit in preserving β-cell function. […] [M]ost immune intervention trials in T1D have either failed to achieve success in preserving β-cell function or have met that hurdle but have nonetheless shown only a transient effect.”

vi. Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy Compromises Balance During Daily Activities.

“Patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) have an altered gait strategy (13) and a fivefold increased risk of falling (46). Falling is a major health risk in many developed countries; for example, in the general U.K. population, over a quarter of accidents that required hospital treatment were the result of a fall (7). A fall is preceded by loss of balance, which may be recoverable in some individuals, but requires rapid responses and a high level of strength from the lower-limb muscles (8,9). Nevertheless, the more likely an individual is to lose balance, the more likely they will at some point experience a fall. Therefore, quantifying balance control during every day gait activities may be considered one of the closest proxies for the risk of falling.”

“During walking activities, when an individual transfers their weight from one limb to another there are brief periods of large separation between the center of mass and the center of pressure. High levels of muscular strength are required to maintain balance during these periods. These large separations between the center of mass and center of pressure experienced during the single stance periods of dynamic gait activities may be a contributing factor toward understanding why the risk of falling during gait activities is much greater than during quiet standing. Few studies, however, have attempted to address the issue of balance during walking in patients with diabetes, and none have addressed the much more physically challenging activities of stair ascent and descent, during which the risk of falling is known to be very high (7). We therefore investigated a more “dynamic” measure of balance during stair ascent, stair descent, and level walking — three activities with the highest risk of fall-related injury (7) — with the hypothesis that individuals with peripheral neuropathy would display greater separations between their center of mass and center of pressure (i.e., poorer balance), thereby contributing to explaining why they are at high risk of falls.”

“Gait analysis during level walking and stair negotiation was performed in 22 patients with diabetic neuropathy (DPN), 39 patients with diabetes without neuropathy (D), and 28 nondiabetic control subjects (C) using a motion analysis system and embedded force plates in a staircase and level walkway. Balance was assessed by measuring the separation between the body center of mass and center of pressure during level walking, stair ascent, and stair descent. […] DPN patients demonstrated greater (P < 0.05) maximum and range of separations of their center of mass from their center of pressure in the medial-lateral plane during stair descent, stair ascent, and level walking compared with the C group, as well as increased (P < 0.05) mean separation during level walking and stair ascent. The same group also demonstrated greater (P < 0.05) maximum anterior separations (toward the staircase) during stair ascent. […] Greater separations of the center of mass from the center of pressure present a greater challenge to balance. Therefore, the higher medial-lateral separations found in patients with DPN will require greater muscular demands to control upright posture. This may contribute to explaining why patients with DPN are more likely to fall, with the higher separations placing them at a higher risk of experiencing a sideways fall than nondiabetic control subjects. […] balance is markedly impaired in patients with DPN during the gait activities of level ground walking, stair ascent, and stair descent. […] During the gait tasks, we found no significant balance impairments in patients with diabetes without DPN, clearly emphasizing that the link between diabetes and instability is a symptom of peripheral neuropathy.”

August 26, 2017 Posted by | Diabetes, Infectious disease, Language, Neurology, Studies | Leave a comment

Words

The words below are words which I encountered while reading the Rex Stout novels Three Men Out, The Black Mountain, Before Midnight, Three Witnesses, Might as Well Be Dead, Three for the Chair, If Death Ever Slept, And Four to Go, Champagne for One, Plot it Yourself, and Three at Wolfe’s Door.

Colloquy. Chouse. Crass. Carnation. Geste. Jalopy. Squall. Dinghy. Indelibly. Totter. Crock. Chuckhole. Squatty. Paramour. Raceme. Brassy. Scuttlebutt. Ruffle. Lug. Bevy.

Autokinesis. Lilt. Convene. Stole. Chives. Squab. Derogation. Entice. Demimondaine/demirep. Mortarboard. Flattop. Gainsay. Skit. Fraternal. Yowl. Pimiento. Dunce. Ruffian. Creel. Minnow.

Roly-poly. Larrup. Ignominy. Herpetology. Brawny. Scalawag. Mulish. Chartreuse. Moot. Indomitable. Braise. Loll. Peculate. Jostle. Factotum. Billingsgate. Croak. Ramekin. Shirr. Shuck.

Dalliance. Ineluctable. Mull. Fogy. Panicle. Mimeograph. Gimcrack. Blacktop. Capon. Stymie. Impervious. Headlong. Aristology. Fleer. Imputation. Cress. Bestir. Cinch. Cantle. Sudadero.

August 24, 2017 Posted by | Books, Language | Leave a comment

Words

Most of these words are words I encountered while reading Rex Stout novels. To be more specific, perhaps 70 out of these 80 words are words I encountered while reading the Stout novels: And Be a Villain, Trouble in Triplicate, The Second Confession, Three Doors to Death, In the Best Families, Curtains for Three, Murder by the Book, Triple Jeopardy, Prisoner’s Base, and The Golden Spiders.

A few of the words are words which I have also included in previous posts of this kind, but the great majority of the words included are words which I have not previously blogged.

Percipient. Mantlet. Crick. Sepal. Shad. Lam. Gruff. Desist. Arachnology. Raffia. Electroplate. Runt. Temerarious. Temerity. Grump. Chousing. Gyp. Percale. Piddling. Dubiety.

Consommé. Pentathlon. Glower. Divvy. Styptic. Pattycake. Sagacity. Folderol. Glisten. Tassel. Bruit. Petiole. Zwieback. Hock. Flub. Shamus. Concessionaire. Pleat. Echelon. Colleen.

Apodictical. Glisten. Tortfeasor. Arytenoid. Cricoid. Splenetic. Zany. Tint. Boorish. Shuttlecock. Rangy. Gangly. Kilter. Caracul. Adventitious. Malefic. Rancor. Seersucker. Stooge. Frontispiece.

Flange. Avocation. Kobold. Platen. Forlorn. Sourpuss. Celadon. Griddle. Malum. Moot. Albacore. Gaff. Exigency. Cartado. Witling. Flounce. Glom. Pennant. Vernier. Blat.

July 28, 2017 Posted by | Books, Language | 2 Comments

Words

Almost all of the words included below are words which I encountered while reading the Rex Stout books: Too Many Cooks, Some Buried Caesar, Over My Dead Body, Where There’s A Will, Black Orchids, Not Quite Dead Enough, The Silent Speaker, and Too Many Women.

Consilience. Plerophory. Livery. Fleshpot. Electioneer. Estop. Gibbosity. Piroshki. Clodhopper. Phlebotomy. Concordat. Clutch. Katydid. Tarpon. Bower. Scoot. Suds. Rotunda. Gab. Floriculture.

Scowl. Commandeer. Apodictically. Blotch. Bauble. Thurl. Wilt. Huff. Clodhopper. Consignee. Épée. Imprecation. Intransigent. Couturier. Quittance. Dingus. MetonymyChintzy. Skittish. Natty.

Intrigante. Curlicue. Bedraggled. Rotogravure. Legatee. Caper. Phiz. Derrick. Labellum. Mumblety-peg. Flump. Kerplunk. Portage. Pettish. Darb. Partridge. Cheviot. Jaunty. Accouterment. Obreptitious.

Receptacle. Impetuous. Springe. Toting. Blowsy. Flam. Linnet. Carton. Bollix. Awning. Chiffonier. Sniggle. Toggle. Craw. Simp. Titter. Wren. Endive. Assiduity. Pudgy.

July 12, 2017 Posted by | Books, Language | Leave a comment

Words

Many of the words below, though far from all of them, are words which I’ve encountered while reading Rex Stout‘s Nero Wolfe novels. I’ve read roughly 20 of Stout’s books over the last month or so and I like them a lot.

Scofflaw. Vulnific. Brisance. Delitescent. Scrunch. Tosspot. Flaneur. Crenellation. Autotelic. Decoupage. Gulosity. Bray. Modish. Cloddish. Vermiculate. Logy. Instar. Amatory. Coddle. Rayon.

Impedimenta. Mosey. Mucilage. Lulu. Contrariety. Loam. Lath. Sumac. Excelsior. Crotalid. Tonneau. Rotogravure. Dicker. Quixotism. Twill. Sill. Rumpus. Avoirdupois. Tarragon. Flummery.

Extempore. Rodomontade. Piddling. Dainties. Dingy. Aplomb. Gullery. Mash note. Carom. Flue. Traipsing. Contumacy. Hoosegow. Modicum. Snooty. Phiz. Acarpous. Gob. Scraggly. Spiff.

Frazzle. Burlap. Ruction. Apodictic. Clepe. Craichy. Fricandeau. Rut. Scuff. Querulous. Escutcheon. Dolichocephaly. Pestiferous. Caravansary. Coquin. Klieg. Gump. Herringbone. Ebullience. Confraternity.

 

July 5, 2017 Posted by | Language | Leave a comment

Words

Orthoepy. Elucubrate. Lachrymatory. Ephectic. Palilogy. Sempiternal. Anadrome. Entelechy. Paracosm. Amerce. Syndactyly. Ustulation. Darrein. Mesority. Busker. Philematology. Episiotomy. Codger. Dacite. Obliviality.

Vermiculate. Temeritous. Buckler. Gormless. Vaginismus. Twerp. Décolletage. Wimple. Buccal. Anadromous/catadromous. Seraglio. Theriomorphic. Hypogeum. Sempervirent. Chinwag. Belonephobia/aichmophobia. Blepharospasm. Vigesimal. Eonism. Grandisonant.

Tiddly. Dactylography. Fulgurous. Oppilate. Xerophagy. Ostler. Skeuomorph. Lubricity. Yclept.
Dyspareunia. Sthenic. Magnalium. Vigil. Sejunction. Tonology. Tussle. Radix. Natatory. Obsidional.
Patagium.

Quillet. Elutriate. Runnel. Energumen. Mullered. Aquatint. Wyvern. Undine. Hectograph.
Traction engine. Custrel. Ochlagogy. Saturnalia. Querent. Tucket. Custrel. Sanguinolent. Abaisse. Clavis. Scenester.

Stonker. Ramus. Anfractuous. Scrumptious. Ctenoid. Enfleurage. Lamina. Worsted. Schlemiel. Erubescent. Clachan. Vinew. Dottle. Armlet. Kernel. Quitclaim. Avulsion. Dehisce. Zephyr. Kenning.

May 30, 2017 Posted by | Language | Leave a comment

Words

Sciolism, amative, hypocorism, leiotrichouslatitudinariancircumlocutionary, daedal, ceruse, wimple, doyen, fuscous, jorum, groupuscule, gelid, hadal, palfrey, malum, cachou, fellmonger, susurrus.

Zeteticeirenicon, dystocia, vicereine, brachiation, odalisque, daglock, galumph, plantain, insufflation, marquetry, névé, samite, pangram, whisk, hamiform, addeem, oeillade, daggle, teratophilia.

Boffin, paraph, girandole, stramineouscusp, telishment, lenition, paludous, phoresy, foramen, zymurgy, pinion, clusivity, gnomon, enallage, zymogram, autopoiesis, bradyseism, appurtenant, dealation.

Peen, chamfer, siphonapterology, onomastics, stridulate, whinging, irrorate, amnion, pectination, sturt, anthelminthic, arrhinia, aprosopia, viscidity, periotic, constat, muffler, ostosis, petrichor, scelidate.

Thalassochorykex, engastration, braw, urbicolous, armillary, clanger, crith, enteron, mullion, quag, hooch, enounce, congé, bdelygmia, catenative, falx, cotyledon, egret, pericyte.

May 20, 2017 Posted by | Language | Leave a comment

Words

Almost all the words included in this post are words I encountered while reading the Flashman novels Flashman and the Mountain of Light, Flash for Freedom!, and Flashman and the Redskins. Almost all the words are words I have not included in similar posts in the past, but I decided to include a few words (2 or 3 words, something like that) I already included in similar posts in the past because I like those words and the fact that I had taken notice of them while reading these novels indicates to me that they haven’t yet stuck in my mind the way I’d like them to do; I usually only mark out words with which I’m either unfamiliar or words the meaning of which I have trouble remembering.

The post includes 6 segments of 20 words/concepts each.

Duff. Coparcener. Chunter. Haver. Sop. Purdah. Bedewing. Paynim. Conniptions. Pap. Tiffin. Aigrette. Whippet. Grandee. Caparison. Howdah. Mahout. Malediction. Tipple. Slantendicular.

Collogue. Hocussing. Sobersided/sobersides. Grog. Ramage. Hutment. Peradventure. Truckle. Caracole. Hustings. Gamester. Barracoon. Bowsprit. Gorget. Midge. Mumchance. Kurbash. Mudge. Unchancy. Mizzenmast/mizzen.

Wiseacre. Cully. SibilantHummock. Gloaming. Clew. Bestride. Dragoman. Lanyard. Binnacle. Stevedore. Corn pone/pone. Bawd. Spavin. Plaintiff. Wickiup. Julep. Holystone. Crimp. Melodeon.

Bitumen. Reticule. Roustabout. Teamster (Interestingly what this word means seems to have changed over time. In the Flashman setting the word is used to describe someone who’s handling teams of slaves; i.e. a slave driver). Serape. Crupper. Stockman. Carter. Clodpole. Tenderfoot. Chevron. Doss. Coonskin. Roué. Bight. Ferrule. Bodkin. Pelf. Pother. Ford.

Concourse. Dixie. Tobyman. Kedgeree. Prepossess. Rivet. Clubbable. Bower. Pottle. Clog. Waft. Lariat. Bargee. Gallus. Navvy. Papoose. Levee. Minatory. Wend. Statuary.

Fustian. Blatherskite. Escritoire. Twanging. Tippet. Wanton. Convivial. Blandishment. Quirt. Coulee. Guidon. Sorrel. Arrant. Contumelious. Depilation. Magnate. Vatic. Grimalkin. Manciple. Banns.

May 2, 2017 Posted by | Books, Language | Leave a comment

Words

Lately I’ve been reading some of George MacDonald Fraser’s Flashman books, which have been quite enjoyable reads in general; I’m reading the books in the order in which the actions in the books supposedly took place, not in the order in which the books were published, and a large number of the words included below are words I encountered in the first three of the books I read (i.e. FlashmanRoyal Flash, and Flashman’s Lady); I decided the post already at that point included a large number of words (the post includes roughly 120 words), so I saw no need to add additional words from the other books in the series in this post as well. I have reviewed a few of the Flashman books I’ve read on goodreads here, here, and here.

Havildar, gimbal, quorum, unmannerly, tribulation, thalassophobia, kiln, sheave, grody, contemn, arcanum, deloping, poulterer, fossorial, catamount, guttersnipe, nabob, frond, matelot, jetty.

Sangar, palliasse, junoesque, cornet, bugle, fettle, toady, thong, trollop, sepoy, wattle, hardtack, snuffle, chunter, ghillie, barker, trousseau, simper, madcap, ramrod.

Welt, landau, declaim, burgomaster, scupper, windlass, maunder, sniffy, sirdar, randy, dowager, toffs, pug, curvet, pish, scriveners, hoyden, manikin, lecher/lechery, busby.

Ruck, leery, ninny, shillyshally, mincing, ringlet, covey, pip, munshi, risaldar, maidan, palankeen/palanquin, forbye, feringhee, cantonment, puggaree, pannikin, dollymop, snook, cordage.

Suet/suety, strumpet, kenspeckle, magsman, scrag, chandler, prigger, chivvy, décolleté, dundrearies, assignation, bruit, purblind, trull, slatterncoffle, doggo, cellarette, cummerbund, agley.

Sampan, wideawake, popsycollation, déshabillé, pinnace, pennant, murk, sprig, linstock, tassel, bangle, trammel, prau, shellback, shako, clobbertaffrail, crinolinetaffeta, commonalty.

April 15, 2017 Posted by | Books, Language | Leave a comment

Words

Over the last couple of weeks I’ve been reading James Herriot’s books and yesterday I finished the last one in the series. The five books (or 8, if you’re British – see the wiki…) I read – I skipped the ‘dog stories’ publication on that list because that book is just a collection of stories included in the other books – contain almost 2500 pages (2479, according to the goodreads numbers provided in the context of the editions I’ve been reading), and they also contained quite a few unfamiliar/nice words and expressions, many of which are included below. If you’re curious about the Herriot books you can read my goodreads reviews of the books here, here (very short), here, and here (I didn’t review The Lord God Made Them All).

Eversionskeevy, censerknout, byreelectuary, trocar/trocarization, clogirascible, gilt, curvet, bullock, niggle, scapegrace, cur, pantile, raddle, scamper, skitter, odoriferous.

Dewlap, seton, muzzy, stirk, shillelagh, borborygmi, omentum, fettle, guddle, cruciate, peduncle/pedunculated, ecraseur, curlew, gabble, gable, festoon, cornada, lambent, lank.

Lope, billet, casement, scree, caliper, dale, stoup, puisne, tumefy, scamp, probang, famble, footling, colostrum, towsle/tousle, loquacious, dapper, cob, meconium, locum.

Mullion, roan, slat, dustman, carvery, abomasum, rostrum, zareba, flithackle, tympanites, pewter, opisthotonos, concertina, miliarylief, spay, otodectic.

March 24, 2017 Posted by | Books, Language | Leave a comment

Words

The great majority of the words below are from books I’ve recently read, I’ve almost not spent any time on vocabulary.com since my last post of this kind; the vocabulary.com guys add new words much too slowly, and most of the words they’ve recently added were not in my opinion all that interesting.

GelidCicatrization. Caudal. Stanchion. Saurian. Griddle. Branks. Purlieu. Arras. Slicker. Insipidity. Sedulously. Splay. Traipse. Gaff. Costive. Depauperate. Quaver. Homiletic.

Anemometer. Flagitious. CarboyMatutinalCognizance. Crispation. Doughty. Crepuscular. Giblets. Venery. Collier. Charnel. Dirge. Natter. Lintel. Disquisition.

Papuliferous. Vespertine. Lusciousness. Damask. Vaunt. Cicatrix. Integument. Heresiarch. Traducement. Apotheosis. Sardanapalian. Vocable. Desiderium. Leucocholy. Compathy.

Callosity. Skosh. Hellacious. Jouncy. Scilicet. Benignancy. TenebrificIpseityHoydenish. Quean. Handsel. Piton. Belvedere. Yenta. Officinal. Sanative. Umbra. Abaxial. Idiographic.

March 6, 2017 Posted by | Language | 4 Comments

Words

I’ve usually in the past combined these lists with other stuff, but I am now strongly considering making these lists into posts of their own in order to make a potential lack of ‘other stuff’ to include in such posts less likely to stop me from posting the words; stuff I don’t blog is more likely to get lost to my memory, so I don’t want to give myself any more excuses not to blog stuff I want to remember/learn than I have to. Most of the words are from books I’ve read over the last weeks, I rarely spend time on vocabulary.com these days (I don’t encounter enough new words on the site these days to justify a significant amount of activity there; there are too many review questions, likely a result of me having mastered words much faster than they’ve added new ones..).

I’ve by now decided to stop (more-or-less…-) systematically checking in each case if I’ve already included a word on a similar list in a previous post; not all the words on these lists from now on will necessarily be ‘new’ to me (to the extent that the words on the previous lists have been, that is…) – so some of these words (and the words to come, assuming other posts will follow) are likely just words I’ve forgot about, and some are words I simply consider to be ‘nice’/’unappreciated’/’not encountered often enough’… I decided to split the words in this post up into smaller groups of words, as one big chunk of words looked slightly ‘scary’ and unapproachable to me. There’s no system to the groupings, the words were originally randomly added to a list I keep of words I knew I’d want to get back to at some point and the cut-offs I later applied when writing this post were more or less completely arbitrary. If you want non-arbitrary groups of interesting words, I refer to the goodreads lists.

Saudade, malapertauriferousfrissonanchorite, lacquerermisoneismcamarilla, cloy, cooper, prevaricatory, impugn, prestidigitation, compeer, lapidary, contumely, contumelious.

Dotard, creel, parricide, assonance, habiliment, assail, mimesis, investiture, irruption, tenuity, tribulation, analectic, succour, augercanker, apophthegm, haruspex, rapine.

Sward, chafferer, argol, sprightly, disport, eyas, garishly, teeter, flocculent, crick, dandle, picaresque, newelanamnesis, imprecateemically, mulch, sommelier, julienne.

Logomachy, chockablock, fusty, diarchy, perfervid, estivationlogy, tumescence, portcullislox, unprocurable, admonitory, kelp, enjambment, lithography.

February 14, 2017 Posted by | Language | Leave a comment