Econstudentlog

100 Cases in Orthopaedics and Rheumatology (I)

This book was decent, but it’s not as good as some of the books I’ve previously read in this series; in some of the books in the series the average length of the answer section is 2-3 pages, which is a format I quite like, whereas in this book the average is more like 1-2 pages – which is a bit too short in my opinion.

Below I have added some links related to the first half of the book’s coverage and a few observations from the book.

Acute haematogenous osteomyelitis. (“There are two principal types of acute osteomyelitis: •haematogenous osteomyelitis •direct or contiguous inoculation osteomyelitis. Acute haematogenous osteomyelitis is characterized by an acute infection of the bone caused by the seeding of the bacteria within the bone from a remote source. This condition occurs primarily in children. […] In general, osteomyelitis has a bimodal age distribution. Acute haematogenous osteomyelitis is primarily a disease in children. Direct trauma and contiguous focus osteomyelitis are more common among adults and adolescents than in children. Spinal osteomyelitis is more common in individuals older than 45 years.”)
Haemophilic arthropathy. (“Haemophilic arthropathy is a condition associated with clotting disorder leading to recurrent bleeding in the joints. Over time this can lead to joint destruction.”)
Avascular necrosis of the femoral head. Trendelenburg’s sign. Gaucher’s disease. Legg–Calvé–Perthes disease. Ficat and Arlet classification of avascular necrosis of femoral head.
Osteosarcoma. Codman triangle. Enneking Classification. (“A firm, irregular mass fixed to underlying structures is more suspicious of a malignant lesion.”)
Ewing’s sarcomaHaversian canal. (“This condition [ES] typically occurs in young patients and presents with pain and fever. [It] is the second most common primary malignant bone tumour (the first being osteosarcoma). The tumour is more common in males and affects children and young adults. The majority develop this between the ages of 10 and 20 years. […] The earliest symptom is pain, which is initially intermittent but becomes intense. Rarely, a patient may present with a pathological fracture. Eighty-five per cent of patients have chromosomal translocations associated with the 11/22 chromosome. Ewing’s sarcoma is potentially the most aggressive form of the primary bone tumours. […] Patients are usually assigned to one of two groups, the tumour being classified as either localized or metastatic disease. Tumours in the pelvis typically present late and are therefore larger with a poorer prognosis. Treatment comprises chemotherapy, surgical resection and/or radiotherapy. […] With localized disease, wide surgical excision of the tumour is preferred over radiotherapy if the involved bone is expendable (e.g. fibular, rib), or if radiotherapy would damage the growth plate. […] Non-metastatic disease survival rates are 55–70 per cent, compared to 22–33 per cent for metastatic disease. Patients require careful follow-up owing to the risk of developing osteosarcoma following radiotherapy, particularly in children in whom it can occur in up to 20 per cent of cases.”
Clavicle Fracture. Floating Shoulder.
Proximal humerus fractures.
Lateral condyle fracture of the humerus. Salter-Harris fracture. (“Humeral condyle fractures occur most commonly between 6 and 10 years of age. […] fractures often appear subtle on radiographs. […] Operative management is essential for all displaced fractures“).
Distal radius fracture. (“Colles’ fractures account for over 90 per cent of distal radius fractures. Any injury to the median nerve can produce paraesthesia in the thumb, index finger, and middle and radial border of the ring finger […]. There is a bimodal age distribution of fractures to the distal radius with two peaks occurring. The first peak occurs in people aged 18–25 years, and a second peak in older people (>65 years). High-energy injuries are more common in the younger group and low-energy injuries in the older group. Osteoporosis may play a role in the occurrence of this later fracture. In the group of patients between 60 and 69 years, women far outnumber men. […] Assessment with plain radiographs is all that is needed for most fractures. […] The majority of distal radius fractures can be treated conservatively.”)
Gamekeeper’s thumb. Stener lesion.
Subtrochanteric Hip Fracture.
Supracondylar Femur Fractures. (“There is a bimodal distribution of fractures based on age and gender. Most high-energy distal femur fractures occur in males aged between 15 and 50 years, while most low-energy fractures occur in osteoporotic women aged 50 or above. The most common high-energy mechanism of injury is a road traffic accident (RTA), and the most common low-energy mechanism is a fall. […] In general, […] non-operative treatment does not work well for displaced fractures. […] Operative intervention is also indicated in the presence of open fractures and injuries associated with vascular injury. […] Total knee replacement is effective in elderly patients with articular fractures and significant osteoporosis, or pre-existing arthritis that is not amenable to open reduction and internal fixation. Low-demand elderly patients with non- or minimally displaced fractures can be managed conservatively. […] In general, this fracture can take a minimum of 3-4 months to unite.”)
Supracondylar humerus fracture. Gartland Classification of Supracondylar Humerus Fractures. (“Prior to the treatment of supracondylar fractures, it is essential to identify the type. Examination of the degree of swelling and deformity as well as a neurological and vascular status assessment of the forearm is essential. A vascular injury may present with signs of an acute compartment syndrome with pain, paraesthesia, pallor, and pulseless and tight forearm. Injury to the brachial artery may present with loss of the distal pulse. However, in the presence of a weak distal pulse, major vessel injury may still be present owing to the collateral circulation. […] Vascular insult can lead to Volkmann ischaemic contracture of the forearm. […] Malunion of the fracture may lead to cubitus varus deformity.”)
Femoral Shaft Fractures.
Femoral Neck Fractures. Garden’s classification. (“Hip fractures are the most common reason for admission to an orthopaedic ward, usually caused by a fall by an elderly person. The average age of a person with a hip fracture is 77 years. Mortality is high: about 10 per cent of people with a hip fracture die within 1 month, and about one-third within 12 months. However, fewer than half of deaths are attributable to the fracture, reflecting the high prevalence of comorbidity. The mental status of the patient is also important: senility is associated with a three-fold increased risk of sepsis and dislocation of prosthetic replacement when compared with mentally alert patients. The one-year mortality rate in these patients is considerable, being reported as high as 50 per cent.”)
Tibia Shaft Fractures. (“The tibia is the most frequent site of a long-bone fracture in the body. […] Open fractures are surgical emergencies […] Most closed tibial fractures can be treated conservatively using plaster of Paris.”)
Tibial plateau fracture. Schatzker classification.
Compartment syndrome. (“This condition is an orthopaedic emergency and can be limb- and life-threatening. Compartment syndrome occurs when perfusion pressure falls below tissue pressure in a closed fascial compartment and results in microvascular compromise. At this point, blood flow through the capillaries stops. In the absence of flow, oxygen delivery stops. Hypoxic injury causes cells to release vasoactive substances (e.g. histamine, serotonin), which increase endothelial permeability. Capillaries allow continued fluid loss, which increases tissue pressure and advances injury. Nerve conduction slows, tissue pH falls due to anaerobic metabolism, surrounding tissue suffers further damage, and muscle tissue suffers necrosis, releasing myoglobin. In untreated cases the syndrome can lead to permanent functional impairment, renal failure secondary to rhabdomyolysis, and death. Patients at risk of compartment syndrome include those with high-velocity injuries, long-bone fractures, high-energy trauma, penetrating injuries such as gunshot wounds and stabbing, and crush injuries, as well as patients on anticoagulants with trauma. The patient usually complains of severe pain that is out of proportion to the injury. An assessment of the affected limb may reveal swelling which feels tense, or hard compartments. Pain on passive range of movement of fingers or toes of the affected limb is a typical feature. Late signs comprise pallor, paralysis, paraesthesia and a pulseless limb. Sensory nerves begin to lose conductive ability, followed by motor nerves. […] Fasciotomy is the definitive treatment for compartment syndrome. The purpose of fasciotomy is to achieve prompt and adequate decompression so as to restore the tissue perfusion.”)
Talus fracture. Hawkins sign. Avascular necrosis.
Calcaneal fracture. (“The most common situation leading to calcaneal fracture is a young adult who falls from a height and lands on his or her feet. […] Patients often sustain occult injuries to their lumbar or cervical spine, and the proximal femur. A thorough clinical and radiological investigation of the spine area is mandatory in patients with calcaneal fracture.”)
Idiopathic scoliosis. Adam’s forward bend test. Romberg test. Cobb angle.
Cauda equina syndrome. (“[Cauda equina syndrome] is an orthopaedic emergency. The condition is characterized by the red-flag signs comprising low back pain, unilateral or bilateral sciatica, saddle anaesthesia with sacral sparing, and bladder and bowel dysfunctions. Urinary retention is the most consistent finding. […] Urgent spinal orthopaedic or neurosurgical consulation is essential, with transfer to a unit capable of undertaking any definitive surgery considered necessary. In the long term, residual weakness, incontinence, impotence and/or sensory abnormalities are potential problems if therapy is delayed. […] The prognosis improves if a definitive cause is identified and appropriate surgical spinal decompression occurs early. Late surgical compression produces varying results and is often associated with a poorer outcome.”)
Developmental dysplasia of the hip.
OsteoarthritisArthroplasty. OsteotomyArthrodesis. (“Early-morning stiffness that gradually diminishes with activity is typical of osteoarthritis. […] Patients with hip pathology can sometimes present with knee pain without any groin or thigh symptoms. […] Osteoarthritis most commonly affects middle-aged and elderly patients. Any synovial joint can develop osteoarthritis. This condition can lead to degeneration of articular cartilage and is often associated with stiffness.”)
Prepatellar bursitis.
Baker’s cyst.
Meniscus tear. McMurray test. Apley’s test. Lachman test.
Anterior cruciate ligament injury.
Achilles tendon rupture. Thompson Test.
Congenital Talipes EquinovarusPonseti method. Pirani score. (“Club foot is bilateral in about 50 per cent of cases and occurs in approximately 1 in 800 births.”)
Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease. Pes cavus. Claw toe deformity. Pes planus.
Hallux valgus. Hallux Rigidus.
Mallet toe deformity. Condylectomy. Syme amputation. (“Mallet toes are common in diabetics with peripheral neuropathy. […] Pain and/or a callosity is often the presenting complaint. This may also lead to nail deformity on the toe. Most commonly the deformity is present in the second toe. […] Footwear modification […] should be tried first […] Surgical management of mallet toe is indicated if the deformity becomes painful.”)
Hammer Toe.
Lisfranc injury. Fleck sign. (“The Lisfranc joint, which represents the articulation between the midfoot and forefoot, is composed of the five TMT [tarsometatarsal] joints. […] A Lisfranc injury encompasses everything from a sprain to a complete disruption of normal anatomy through the TMT joints. […] Lisfranc injuries are commonly undiagnosed and carry a high risk of chronic secondary disability.”)
Charcot joint. (“Charcot arthropathy results in progressive destruction of bone and soft tissues at weight-bearing joints. In its most severe form it may cause significant disruption of the bony architecture, including joint dislocations and fractures. Charcot arthropathy can occur at any joint but most commonly affects the lower regions: the foot and ankle. Bilateral disease occurs in fewer than 10 per cent of patients. Any condition that leads to a sensory or autonomic neuropathy can cause a Charcot joint. Charcot arthropathy can occur as a complication of diabetes, syphilis, alcoholism, leprosy, meningomyleocele, spinal cord injury, syringomyelia, renal dialysis and congenital insensitivity to pain. In the majority of cases, non-operative methods are preferred. The principles of management are to provide immobilization of the affected joint and reduce any areas of stress on the skin. Immobilization is usually accomplished by casting.”)
Lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow). (“For work-related lateral epicondylitis, a systematic review identified three risk factors: handling tools heavier than 1 kg, handling loads heavier than 20 kg at least ten times per day, and repetitive movements for more than two hours per day. […] Up to 95 per cent of patients with tennis elbow respond to conservative measures.”)
Medial Epicondylitis.
De Quervain’s tenosynovitis. Finkelstein test. Intersection syndrome. Wartenberg’s syndrome.
Trigger finger.
Adhesive capsulitis (‘frozen shoulder’). (“Frozen shoulder typically has three phases: the painful phase, the stiffening phase and the thawing phase. During the initial phase there is a gradual onset of diffuse shoulder pain lasting from weeks to months. The stiffening phase is characterized by a progressive loss of motion that may last up to a year. The majority of patients lose glenohumeral external rotation, internal rotation and abduction during this phase. The final, thawing phase ranges from weeks to months and constitutes a period of gradual motion improvement. Once in this phase, the patient may require up to 9 months to regain a fully functional range of motion. There is a higher incidence of frozen shoulder in patients with diabetes compared with the general population. The incidence among patients with insulin-dependent diabetes is even higher, with an increased frequency of bilateral frozen shoulder. Adhesive capsulitis has also been reported in patients with hyperthyroidism, ischaemic heart disease, and cervical spondylosis. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are recommended in the initial treatment phase. […] A subgroup of patients with frozen shoulder syndrome often fail to improve despite conservative measures. In these cases, interventions such as manipulation, distension arthrography or open surgical release may be beneficial.” [A while back I covered some papers on adhesive capsulitis and diabetes here (part iii) – US].
Dupuytren’s Disease. (“Dupuytren’s contracture is a benign, slowly progressive fibroproliferative disease of the palmar fascia. […] The disease presents most commonly in the ring and little fingers and is bilateral in 45 per cent of cases. […] Dupuytren’s disease is more common in males and people of northern European origin. It can be associated with prior hand trauma, alcoholic cirrhosis, epilepsy (due to medications such as phenytoin), and diabetes. [“Dupuytren’s disease […] may be observed in up to 42% of adults with diabetes mellitus, typically in patients with long-standing T1D” – I usually don’t like such unspecific reported prevalences (what does ‘up to’ really mean?), but the point is that this is not a 1 in a 100 complication among diabetics; it seems to be a relatively common complication in type 1 DM – US] The prevalence increases with age. Mild cases may not need any treatment. Surgery is indicated in progressive contractures and established deformity […] Recurrence or extension of the disease after operation is not uncommon”).

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July 1, 2018 - Posted by | Books, Cancer/oncology, Diabetes, Medicine, Neurology

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