Econstudentlog

Quotes

i. “The advantage of living is not measured by length, but by use; some men have lived long, and lived little; attend to it while you are in it. It lies in your will, not in the number of years, for you to have lived enough.” (Michel de Montaigne)

ii. “All of the days go toward death and the last one arrives there.” (-ll-)

iii. “Nothing is so firmly believed as that which we least know.” (-ll-) (Variant: “Men are most apt to believe what they least understand.”)

iv. “The plague of man is boasting of his knowledge.” (-ll-)

v. “Saying is one thing and doing is another.” (-ll-)

vi. “Let no man be ashamed to speak what he is not ashamed to think.” (-ll-)

vii. “Few men have been admired by their own households.” (-ll-)

viii. “There is no wish more natural than the wish to know.” (-ll-)

ix. “It is not without good reason said, that he who has not a good memory should never take upon him the trade of lying.” (-ll-)

x. “Religion abhors the competition for truth. Science can’t live without it.” (Scott Atran, In gods we trust)

xi. “Imagination and intelligence enter into our existence in the part of servants of the primary instincts.” (Albert Einstein, Out of My Later Years (1950)), as quoted in Scott Atran’s In Gods we trust)

xii. “…yes, we are smart, but not because we stand on the shoulders of giants or are giants ourselves. We stand on the shoulders of a very large pyramid of hobbits. The hobbits do get a bit taller as the pyramid ascends, but it’s still the number of hobbits, not the height of particular hobbits, that’s allowing us to see farther.” (Joseph Heinrich, The Secret of Our Success)

xiii. “Underlying these failures is the assumption that we, as humans, all perceive the world similarly, want the same things, pursue these things based on our beliefs (the “facts” about the world), and process new information and experience in the same way. We already know all these assumptions are wrong. […] Different societies possess quite different social norms, institutions, languages, and technologies, and consequently they possess different ways of reasoning, mental heuristics, motivations, and emotional reactions. […] Culture, social norms, and institutions all shape our brains, biology, and hormones, as well as our perceptions, motivations, and judgments. We can’t pick our underlying cultural perceptions and motivations any more than we can suddenly speak a new language.” (-ll-)

xiv. “One of the debates in this literature involves opposing “innate” and “learned” in explaining our abilities and behaviors. [However,] much behavior is both 100% innate and 100% learned. For example, humans have clearly evolved to walk on two legs, and it’s one of our species’ behavioral signatures. Yet we also clearly learn to walk. […] showing that something is learned only tells us about the developmental process but not about whether it was favored by natural selection acting on genes.” (-ll-)

xv. “People always talk about the body as a beautiful well-oiled machine. But sometimes the body communicates with itself by messages written with radioactive ink on asbestos-laced paper, in the hopes that it’s killing itself slightly more slowly than it’s killing anyone who tries to send it fake messages. Honestly it is a miracle anybody manages to stay alive at all.” (Scott Alexander)

xvi. “It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.” (André Gide)

xvii. “No matter how full a reservoir of maxims one may possess, and no matter how good one’s sentiments may be, if one have not taken advantage of every concrete opportunity to act, one’s character may remain entirely unaffected for the better.” (William James, Principles of Psychology)

xviii. “It is the duty of every man to endeavour that something may be added by his industry to the hereditary aggregate of knowledge and happiness. To add much can indeed be the lot of few, but to add something, however little, every one may hope” (Samuel Johnson, The Major Works of Samuel Johnson)

xix. ” …we should always wish to preserve the dignity of virtue by adorning her with graces which wickedness cannot assume.” (-ll-)

xx. “Let pain deserved without complaint be borne.” (“Leniter ex merito quicquid patiare ferendum est”) (Ovid, as quoted in -ll-)

 

August 20, 2019 - Posted by | Anthropology, Books, culture, Quotes/aphorisms

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