Econstudentlog

Molecular biology (I?)

“This is a great publication, considering the format. These authors in my opinion managed to get quite close to what I’d consider to be ‘the ideal level of coverage’ for books of this nature.”

The above was what I wrote in my short goodreads review of the book. In this post I’ve added some quotes from the first chapters of the book and some links to topics covered.

Quotes:

“Once the base-pairing double helical structure of DNA was understood it became apparent that by holding and preserving the genetic code DNA is the source of heredity. The heritable material must also be capable of faithful duplication every time a cell divides. The DNA molecule is ideal for this. […] The effort then concentrated on how the instructions held by the DNA were translated into the choice of the twenty different amino acids that make up proteins. […] George Gamov [yes, that George Gamov! – US] made the suggestion that information held in the four bases of DNA (A, T, C, G) must be read as triplets, called codons. Each codon, made up of three nucleotides, codes for one amino acid or a ‘start’ or ‘stop’ signal. This information, which determines an organism’s biochemical makeup, is known as the genetic code. An encryption based on three nucleotides means that there are sixty-four possible three-letter combinations. But there are only twenty amino acids that are universal. […] some amino acids can be coded for by more than one codon.”

“The mechanism of gene expression whereby DNA transfers its information into proteins was determined in the early 1960s by Sydney Brenner, Francois Jacob, and Matthew Meselson. […] Francis Crick proposed in 1958 that information flowed in one direction only: from DNA to RNA to protein. This was called the ‘Central Dogma‘ and describes how DNA is transcribed into RNA, which then acts as a messenger carrying the information to be translated into proteins. Thus the flow of information goes from DNA to RNA to proteins and information can never be transferred back from protein to nucleic acid. DNA can be copied into more DNA (replication) or into RNA (transcription) but only the information in mRNA [messenger RNA] can be translated into protein”.

“The genome is the entire DNA contained within the forty-six chromosomes located in the nucleus of each human somatic (body) cell. […] The complete human genome is composed of over 3 billion bases and contain approximately 20,000 genes that code for proteins. This is much lower than earlier estimates of 80,000 to 140,000 and astonished the scientific community when revealed through human genome sequencing. Equally surprising was the finding that genomes of much simpler organisms sequenced at the same time contained a higher number of protein-coding genes than humans. […] It is now clear that the size of the genome does not correspond with the number of protein-coding genes, and these do not determine the complexity of an organism. Protein-coding genes can be viewed as ‘transcription units’. These are made up of sequences called exons that code for amino acids, and separated by by non-coding sequences called introns. Associated with these are additional sequences termed promoters and enhancers that control the expression of that gene.”

“Some sections of the human genome code for RNA molecules that do not have the capacity to produce proteins. […] it is now becoming apparent that many play a role in controlling gene expression. Despite the importance of proteins, less than 1.5 per cent of the genome is made up of exon sequences. A recent estimate is that about 80 per cent of the genome is transcribed or involved in regulatory functions with the rest mainly composed of repetitive sequences. […] Satellite DNA […] is a short sequence repeated many thousands of times in tandem […] A second type of repetitive DNA is the telomere sequence. […] Their role is to prevent chromosomes from shortening during DNA replication […] Repetitive sequences can also be found distributed or interspersed throughout the genome. These repeats have the ability to move around the genome and are referred to as mobile or transposable DNA. […] Such movements can be harmful sometimes as gene sequences can be disrupted causing disease. […] The vast majority of transposable sequences are no longer able to move around and are considered to be ‘silent’. However, these movements have contributed, over evolutionary time, to the organization and evolution of the genome, by creating new or modified genes leading to the production of proteins with novel functions.”

“A very important property of DNA is that it can make an accurate copy of itself. This is necessary since cells die during the normal wear and tear of tissues and need to be replenished. […] DNA replication is a highly accurate process with an error occurring every 10,000 to 1 million bases in human DNA. This low frequency is because the DNA polymerases carry a proofreading function. If an incorrect nucleotide is incorporated during DNA synthesis, the polymerase detects the error and excises the incorrect base. Following excision, the polymerase reinserts the correct base and replication continues. Any errors that are not corrected through proofreading are repaired by an alternative mismatch repair mechanism. In some instances, proofreading and repair mechanisms fail to correct errors. These become permanent mutations after the next cell division cycle as they are no longer recognized as errors and are therefore propagated each time the DNA replicates.”

DNA sequencing identifies the precise linear order of the nucleotide bases A, C, G, T, in a DNA fragment. It is possible to sequence individual genes, segments of a genome, or whole genomes. Sequencing information is fundamental in helping us understand how our genome is structured and how it functions. […] The Human Genome Project, which used Sanger sequencing, took ten years to sequence and cost 3 billion US dollars. Using high-throughput sequencing, the entire human genome can now be sequenced in a few days at a cost of 3,000 US dollars. These costs are continuing to fall, making it more feasible to sequence whole genomes. The human genome sequence published in 2003 was built from DNA pooled from a number of donors to generate a ‘reference’ or composite genome. However, the genome of each individual is unique and so in 2005 the Personal Genome Project was launched in the USA aiming to sequence and analyse the genomes of 100,000 volunteers across the world. Soon after, similar projects followed in Canada and Korea and, in 2013, in the UK. […] To store and analyze the huge amounts of data, computational systems have developed in parallel. This branch of biology, called bioinformatics, has become an extremely important collaborative research area for molecular biologists drawing on the expertise of computer scientists, mathematicians, and statisticians.”

“[T]he structure of RNA differs from DNA in three fundamental ways. First, the sugar is a ribose, whereas in DNA it is a deoxyribose. Secondly, in RNA the nucleotide bases are A, G, C, and U (uracil) instead of A, G, C, and T. […] Thirdly, RNA is a single-stranded molecule unlike double-stranded DNA. It is not helical in shape but can fold to form a hairpin or stem-loop structure by base-pairing between complementary regions within the same RNA molecule. These two-dimensional secondary structures can further fold to form complex three-dimensional, tertiary structures. An RNA molecule is able to interact not only with itself, but also with other RNAs, with DNA, and with proteins. These interactions, and the variety of conformations that RNAs can adopt, enables them to carry out a wide range of functions. […] RNAs can influence many normal cellular and disease processes by regulating gene expression. RNA interference […] is one of the main ways in which gene expression is regulated.”

“Translation of the mRNA to a protein takes place in the cell cytoplasm on ribosomes. Ribosomes are cellular structures made up primarily of rRNA and proteins. At the ribosomes, the mRNA is decoded to produce a specific protein according to the rules defined by the genetic code. The correct amino acids are brought to the mRNA at the ribosomes by molecules called transfer RNAs (tRNAs). […] At the start of translation, a tRNA binds to the mRNA at the start codon AUG. This is followed by the binding of a second tRNA matching the adjacent mRNA codon. The two neighbouring amino acids linked to the tRNAs are joined together by a chemical bond called the peptide bond. Once the peptide bond forms, the first tRNA detaches leaving its amino acid behind. The ribosome then moves one codon along the mRNA and a third tRNA binds. In this way, tRNAs sequentially bind to the mRNA as the ribosome moves from codon to codon. Each time a tRNA molecule binds, the linked amino acid is transferred to the growing amino acid chain. Thus the mRNA sequence is translated into a chain of amino acids connected by peptide bonds to produce a polypeptide chain. Translation is terminated when the ribosome encounters a stop codon […]. After translation, the chain is folded and very often modified by the addition of sugar or other molecules to produce fully functional proteins.”

“The naturally occurring RNAi pathway is now extensively exploited in the laboratory to study the function of genes. It is possible to design synthetic siRNA molecules with a sequence complementary to the gene under study. These double-stranded RNA molecules are then introduced into the cell by special techniques to temporarily knock down the expression of that gene. By studying the phenotypic effects of this severe reduction of gene expression, the function of that gene can be identified. Synthetic siRNA molecules also have the potential to be used to treat diseases. If a disease is caused or enhanced by a particular gene product, then siRNAs can be designed against that gene to silence its expression. This prevents the protein which drives the disease from being produced. […] One of the major challenges to the use of RNAi as therapy is directing siRNA to the specific cells in which gene silencing is required. If released directly into the bloodstream, enzymes in the bloodstream degrade siRNAs. […] Other problems are that siRNAs can stimulate the body’s immune response and can produce off-target effects by silencing RNA molecules other than those against which they were specifically designed. […] considerable attention is currently focused on designing carrier molecules that can transport siRNA through the bloodstream to the diseased cell.”

“Both Northern blotting and RT-PCR enable the expression of one or a few genes to be measured simultaneously. In contrast, the technique of microarrays allows gene expression to be measured across the full genome of an organism in a single step. This massive scale genome analysis technique is very useful when comparing gene expression profiles between two samples. […] This can identify gene subsets that are under- or over-expressed in one sample relative to the second sample to which it is compared.”

Links:

Molecular biology.
Charles Darwin. Alfred Wallace. Gregor Mendel. Wilhelm Johannsen. Heinrich Waldeyer. Theodor Boveri. Walter Sutton. Friedrich Miescher. Phoebus Levene. Oswald Avery. Colin MacLeod. Maclyn McCarty. James Watson. Francis Crick. Rosalind Franklin. Andrew Fire. Craig Mello.
Gene. Genotype. Phenotype. Chromosome. Nucleotide. DNA. RNA. Protein.
Chargaff’s rules.
Photo 51.
Human Genome Project.
Long interspersed nuclear elements (LINEs). Short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs).
Histone. Nucleosome.
Chromatin. Euchromatin. Heterochromatin.
Mitochondrial DNA.
DNA replication. Helicase. Origin of replication. DNA polymeraseOkazaki fragments. Leading strand and lagging strand. DNA ligase. Semiconservative replication.
Mutation. Point mutation. Indel. Frameshift mutation.
Genetic polymorphism. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP).
Genome-wide association study (GWAS).
Molecular cloning. Restriction endonuclease. Multiple cloning site (MCS). Bacterial artificial chromosome.
Gel electrophoresis. Southern blot. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). Quantitative PCR (qPCR).
GenBank. European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL). Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE).
RNA polymerase II. TATA box. Transcription factor IID. Stop codon.
Protein biosynthesis.
SmRNA (small nuclear RNA).
Untranslated region (/UTR sequences).
Transfer RNA.
Micro RNA (miRNA).
Dicer (enzyme).
RISC (RNA-induced silencing complex).
Argonaute.
Lipid-Based Nanoparticles for siRNA Delivery in Cancer Therapy.
Long non-coding RNA.
Ribozyme/catalytic RNA.
RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq).

May 5, 2018 Posted by | Biology, Books, Chemistry, Genetics, Medicine, Molecular biology | Leave a comment