Econstudentlog

100 cases in surgery (II)

Below I have added some links and quotes related to the last half of the book’s coverage.

Ischemic rest pain. (“Rest pain indicates inadequate tissue perfusion. *Urgent investigation and treatment is required to salvage the limb. […] The material of choice for bypass grafting is autogenous vein. […] The long-term patency of prosthetic grafts is inferior compared with autogenous vein.”)
Deep vein thrombosis.
Lymphedema. (“In lymphoedema, the vast majority of patients (>90 per cent) are treated conservatively. […] Debulking operations […] are only considered for a selected few patients where the function of the limb is impaired or those with recurrent attacks of severe cellulitis.”)
Varicose veins. Trendelenburg Test. (“Surgery on the superficial venous system should be avoided in patients with an incompetent deep venous system.”)
Testicular Torsion.
Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.
Acute pyelonephritis. (“In patients with recurrent infection in the urinary system, significant pathology needs excluding such as malignancy, urinary tract stone disease and abnormal urinary tract anatomy.”)
Renal cell carcinomavon Hippel-Lindau syndrome. (“Approximately one-quarter to one-third of patients with renal cell carcinomas have metastases at presentation. […] The classic presenting triad of loin pain, a mass and haematuria only occurs in about 10 per cent of patients. More commonly, one of these features appears in isolation.”)
Haematuria. (“When taking the history, it is important to elicit the following: •Visible or non-visible: duration of haematuria • Age: cancers are more common with increasing age •Sex: females more likely to have urinary tract infections• Location: during micturition, was the haematuria always present (indicative of renal, ureteric or bladder pathology) or was it only present initially (suggestive of anterior urethral pathology) or present at the end of the stream (posterior urethra, bladder neck)? •Pain: more often associated with infection/inflammation/calculi, whereas malignancy tends to be painless •Associated lower urinary tract symptoms that will be helpful in determining aetiology •History of trauma Travel abroad […] •Previous urological surgery/history/recent instrumentation/prostatic biopsy •Medication, e.g. anticoagulants •Family history •Occupational history, e.g. rubber/dye occupational hazards are risk factors for developing transitional carcinoma of the bladder […] •Smoking status: increased risk, particularly of bladder cancer •General status, e.g. weight loss, reduced appetite […] Anticoagulation can often unmask other pathology in the urinary tract. […] Patients on oral anticoagulation who develop haematuria still require investigation.”)
Urinary retention. (“Acute and chronic retention are usually differentiated by the presence or absence of pain. Acute retention is painful, unlike chronic retention, when the bladder accommodates the increase in volume over time.”)
Colles’ fracture/Distal Radius Fractures. (“In all fractures the distal neurological and vascular status should be assessed.”)
Osteoarthritis. (“Radiological evidence of osteoarthritis is common, with 80 per cent of individuals over 80 years demonstrating some evidence of the condition. […] The commonest symptoms are pain, a reduction in mobility, and deformity of the affected joint.”)
Simmonds’ test.
Patella fracture.
Dislocated shoulder.
Femur fracture. (“Fractured neck of the femur is a relatively common injury following a fall in the elderly population. The rate of hip fracture doubles every decade from the age of 50 years. There is a female preponderance of three to one. […] it is important to take a comprehensive history, concentrating on the mechanism of injury. It is incorrect to assume that all falls are mechanical; it is not uncommon to find that the cause of the fall is actually due to a urinary or chest infection or even a silent myocardial infarction.”)
The Ottawa Ankle Rules.
Septic arthritis.
Carpal tunnel syndrome. Tinel’s test. Phalen’s Test. (“It is important, when examining a patient with suspected carpal tunnel syndrome, to carefully examine their neck, shoulder, and axilla. […] the source of the neurological compression may be proximal to the carpal tunnel”)
Acute Compartment Syndrome. (“Within the limbs there are a number of myofascial compartments. These consist of muscles contained within a relatively fixed-volume structure, bounded by fascial layers and bone. After trauma the pressure in the myofascial compartment increases. This pressure may exceed the venous capillary pressure, resulting in a loss of venous outflow from the compartment. The failure to clear metabolites also leads to the accumulation of fluid as a result of osmosis. If left untreated, the pressure will eventually exceed arterial pressure, leading to significant tissue ischaemia. The damage is irreversible after 4–6 h. Tibial fractures are the commonest cause of an acute compartment syndrome, which is thought to complicate up to 20 per cent of these injuries. […] The classical description of ‘pain out of proportion to the injury’ may [unfortunately] be difficult to determine if the clinician is inexperienced.”)
Hemarthrosis. (“Most knee injuries result in swelling which develops over hours rather than minutes. [A] history of immediate knee swelling suggests that there is a haemarthrosis.”)
Sickle cell crisis.
Cervical Spine Fracture. Neurogenic shock. NEXUS Criteria for C-Spine Imaging.
Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis. Trethowan sign. (“At any age, a limp in a child should always be taken seriously.”)

ATLS guidelines. (“The ATLS protocol should be followed even in the presence of obvious limb deformity, to ensure a potentially life-threatening injury is not missed.”)
Peritonsillar Abscess.
Epistaxis. Little’s area.
Croup. Acute epiglottitis. (“Acute epiglottitis is an absolute emergency and is usually caused by Haemophilus influenzae. There is significant swelling, and any attempt to examine the throat may result in airway obstruction. […] In adults it tends to cause a supraglottitis. It has a rapid progression and can lead to total airway obstruction. […] Stridor is an ominous sign and needs to be taken seriously.”)
Bell’s palsy.
Subarachnoid hemorrhageInternational subarachnoid aneurysm trial.
Chronic subdural hematoma. (“This condition is twice as common in men as women. Risk factors include chronic alcoholism, epilepsy, anticoagulant therapy (including aspirin) and thrombocytopenia. CSDH is more common in elderly patients due to cerebral atrophy. […] Initial misdiagnosis is, unfortunately, quite common. […] a chronic subdural haematoma should be suspected in confused patients with a history of a fall.”)
Extradural Haematoma. Cushing response. (“A direct blow to the temporo-parietal area is the commonest cause of an extradural haematoma. The bleed is normally arterial in origin. In 85 per cent of cases there is an associated skull fracture that causes damage to the middle meningeal artery. […] This situation represents a neurosurgical emergency. Without urgent decompression the patient will die. Unlike the chronic subdural, which can be treated with Burr hole drainage, the more dense acute arterial haematoma requires a craniotomy in order to evacuate it.”)
Cauda equina syndromeNeurosurgery for Cauda Equina Syndrome.
ASA classification. (“Patients having an operation within 3 months of a myocardial infarction carry a 30 per cent risk of reinfarction or cardiac death. This drops to 5 per cent after 6 months. […] Patients with COPD have difficulty clearing secretions from the lungs during the postoperative period. They also have a higher risk of basal atelectasis and are more prone to chest infections. These factors in combination with postoperative pain (especially in thoracic or abdominal major surgery) make them prone to respiratory complications. […] Patients with diabetes have an increased risk of postoperative complications because of the presence of microvascular and macrovascular disease: •Atherosclerosis: ischaemic heart disease/peripheral vascular disease/cerebrovascular disease •Nephropathy: renal insufficiency […] •Autonomic neuropathy: gastroparesis, decreased bladder tone •Peripheral neuropathy: lower-extremity ulceration, infection, gangrene •Poor wound healingIncreased risk of infection Tight glycaemic control (6–10 mmol/L) and the prevention of hypoglycaemia are critical in preventing perioperative and postoperative complications. The patient with diabetes should be placed first on the operating list to avoid prolonged fasting.
“)
MalnutritionHartmann’s procedure. (“Malnutrition leads to delayed wound healing, reduced ventilatory capacity, reduced immunity and an increased risk of infection. […] The two main methods of feeding are either by the enteral route or the parenteral route. Enteral feeding is via the gastrointestinal tract. It is less expensive and is associated with fewer complications than feeding by the parenteral route. […] The parenteral route should only be used if there is an inability to ingest, digest, absorb or propulse nutrients through the gastrointestinal tract. It can be administered by either a peripheral or central line. Peripheral parenteral nutrition can cause thrombophlebitis […] Sepsis is the most frequent and serious complication of centrally administered parenteral nutrition.”)
Acute Kidney Injury. (“The aetiology of acute renal failure can be thought of in three main categories: •Pre-renal: the glomerular filtration is reduced because of poor renal perfusion. This is usually caused by hypovolaemia as a result of acute blood loss, fluid depletion or hypotension. […] • Renal: this is the result of damage directly to the glomerulus or tubule. The use of drugs such as NSAIDs, contrast agents or aminoglycosides all have direct nephrotoxic effects. Acute tubular necrosis can occur as a result of prolonged hypoperfusion […]. Pre-existing renal disease such as diabetic nephropathy or glomerulonephritis makes patients more susceptible to further renal injury. •Post-renal: this can be simply the result of a blocked catheter. […] Calculi, blood clots, ureteric ligation and prostatic hypertrophy can also all lead to obstruction of urinary flow.”)
Post-operative ileus.

Pulmonary embolism.

Advertisements

April 18, 2018 - Posted by | Books, Cancer/oncology, Cardiology, Gastroenterology, Infectious disease, Medicine, Nephrology, Neurology

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: