Econstudentlog

The Computer

Below some quotes and links related to the book‘s coverage:

“At the heart of every computer is one or more hardware units known as processors. A processor controls what the computer does. For example, it will process what you type in on your computer’s keyboard, display results on its screen, fetch web pages from the Internet, and carry out calculations such as adding two numbers together. It does this by ‘executing’ a computer program that details what the computer should do […] Data and programs are stored in two storage areas. The first is known as main memory and has the property that whatever is stored there can be retrieved very quickly. Main memory is used for transient data – for example, the result of a calculation which is an intermediate result in a much bigger calculation – and is also used to store computer programs while they are being executed. Data in main memory is transient – it will disappear when the computer is switched off. Hard disk memory, also known as file storage or backing storage, contains data that are required over a period of time. Typical entities that are stored in this memory include files of numerical data, word-processed documents, and spreadsheet tables. Computer programs are also stored here while they are not being executed. […] There are a number of differences between main memory and hard disk memory. The first is the retrieval time. With main memory, an item of data can be retrieved by the processor in fractions of microseconds. With file-based memory, the retrieval time is much greater: of the order of milliseconds. The reason for this is that main memory is silicon-based […] hard disk memory is usually mechanical and is stored on the metallic surface of a disk, with a mechanical arm retrieving the data. […] main memory is more expensive than file-based memory”.

The Internet is a network of computers – strictly, it is a network that joins up a number of networks. It carries out a number of functions. First, it transfers data from one computer to another computer […] The second function of the Internet is to enforce reliability. That is, to ensure that when errors occur then some form of recovery process happens; for example, if an intermediate computer fails then the software of the Internet will discover this and resend any malfunctioning data via other computers. A major component of the Internet is the World Wide Web […] The web […] uses the data-transmission facilities of the Internet in a specific way: to store and distribute web pages. The web consists of a number of computers known as web servers and a very large number of computers known as clients (your home PC is a client). Web servers are usually computers that are more powerful than the PCs that are normally found in homes or those used as office computers. They will be maintained by some enterprise and will contain individual web pages relevant to that enterprise; for example, an online book store such as Amazon will maintain web pages for each item it sells. The program that allows users to access the web is known as a browser. […] A part of the Internet known as the Domain Name System (usually referred to as DNS) will figure out where the page is held and route the request to the web server holding the page. The web server will then send the page back to your browser which will then display it on your computer. Whenever you want another page you would normally click on a link displayed on that page and the process is repeated. Conceptually, what happens is simple. However, it hides a huge amount of detail involving the web discovering where pages are stored, the pages being located, their being sent, the browser reading the pages and interpreting how they should be displayed, and eventually the browser displaying the pages. […] without one particular hardware advance the Internet would be a shadow of itself: this is broadband. This technology has provided communication speeds that we could not have dreamed of 15 years ago. […] Typical broadband speeds range from one megabit per second to 24 megabits per second, the lower rate being about 20 times faster than dial-up rates.”

“A major idea I hope to convey […] is that regarding the computer as just the box that sits on your desk, or as a chunk of silicon that is embedded within some device such as a microwave, is only a partial view. The Internet – or rather broadband access to the Internet – has created a gigantic computer that has unlimited access to both computer power and storage to the point where even applications that we all thought would never migrate from the personal computer are doing just that. […] the Internet functions as a series of computers – or more accurately computer processors – carrying out some task […]. Conceptually, there is little difference between these computers and [a] supercomputer, the only difference is in the details: for a supercomputer the communication between processors is via some internal electronic circuit, while for a collection of computers working together on the Internet the communication is via external circuits used for that network.”

“A computer will consist of a number of electronic circuits. The most important is the processor: this carries out the instructions that are contained in a computer program. […] There are a number of individual circuit elements that make up the computer. Thousands of these elements are combined together to construct the computer processor and other circuits. One basic element is known as an And gate […]. This is an electrical circuit that has two binary inputs A and B and a single binary output X. The output will be one if both the inputs are one and zero otherwise. […] the And gate is only one example – when some action is required, for example adding two numbers together, [the different circuits] interact with each other to carry out that action. In the case of addition, the two binary numbers are processed bit by bit to carry out the addition. […] Whatever actions are taken by a program […] the cycle is the same; an instruction is read into the processor, the processor decodes the instruction, acts on it, and then brings in the next instruction. So, at the heart of a computer is a series of circuits and storage elements that fetch and execute instructions and store data and programs.”

“In essence, a hard disk unit consists of one or more circular metallic disks which can be magnetized. Each disk has a very large number of magnetizable areas which can either represent zero or one depending on the magnetization. The disks are rotated at speed. The unit also contains an arm or a number of arms that can move laterally and which can sense the magnetic patterns on the disk. […] When a processor requires some data that is stored on a hard disk […] then it issues an instruction to find the file. The operating system – the software that controls the computer – will know where the file starts and ends and will send a message to the hard disk to read the data. The arm will move laterally until it is over the start position of the file and when the revolving disk passes under the arm the magnetic pattern that represents the data held in the file is read by it. Accessing data on a hard disk is a mechanical process and usually takes a small number of milliseconds to carry out. Compared with the electronic speeds of the computer itself – normally measured in fractions of a microsecond – this is incredibly slow. Because disk access is slow, systems designers try to minimize the amount of access required to files. One technique that has been particularly effective is known as caching. It is, for example, used in web servers. Such servers store pages that are sent to browsers for display. […] Caching involves placing the frequently accessed pages in some fast storage medium such as flash memory and keeping the remainder on a hard disk.”

“The first computers had a single hardware processor that executed individual instructions. It was not too long before researchers started thinking about computers that had more than one processor. The simple theory here was that if a computer had n processors then it would be n times faster. […] it is worth debunking this notion. If you look at many classes of problems […], you see that a strictly linear increase in performance is not achieved. If a problem that is solved by a single computer is solved in 20 minutes, then you will find a dual processor computer solving it in perhaps 11 minutes. A 3-processor computer may solve it in 9 minutes, and a 4-processor computer in 8 minutes. There is a law of diminishing returns; often, there comes a point when adding a processor slows down the computation. What happens is that each processor needs to communicate with the others, for example passing on the result of a computation; this communicational overhead becomes bigger and bigger as you add processors to the point when it dominates the amount of useful work that is done. The sort of problems where they are effective is where a problem can be split up into sub-problems that can be solved almost independently by each processor with little communication.”

Symmetric encryption methods are very efficient and can be used to scramble large files or long messages being sent from one computer to another. Unfortunately, symmetric techniques suffer from a major problem: if there are a number of individuals involved in a data transfer or in reading a file, each has to know the same key. This makes it a security nightmare. […] public key cryptography removed a major problem associated with symmetric cryptography: that of a large number of keys in existence some of which may be stored in an insecure way. However, a major problem with asymmetric cryptography is the fact that it is very inefficient (about 10,000 times slower than symmetric cryptography): while it can be used for short messages such as email texts, it is far too inefficient for sending gigabytes of data. However, […] when it is combined with symmetric cryptography, asymmetric cryptography provides very strong security. […] One very popular security scheme is known as the Secure Sockets Layer – normally shortened to SSL. It is based on the concept of a one-time pad. […] SSL uses public key cryptography to communicate the randomly generated key between the sender and receiver of a message. This key is only used once for the data interchange that occurs and, hence, is an electronic analogue of a one-time pad. When each of the parties to the interchange has received the key, they encrypt and decrypt the data employing symmetric cryptography, with the generated key carrying out these processes. […] There is an impression amongst the public that the main threats to security and to privacy arise from technological attack. However, the threat from more mundane sources is equally high. Data thefts, damage to software and hardware, and unauthorized access to computer systems can occur in a variety of non-technical ways: by someone finding computer printouts in a waste bin; by a window cleaner using a mobile phone camera to take a picture of a display containing sensitive information; by an office cleaner stealing documents from a desk; by a visitor to a company noting down a password written on a white board; by a disgruntled employee putting a hammer through the main server and the backup server of a company; or by someone dropping an unencrypted memory stick in the street.”

“The basic architecture of the computer has remained unchanged for six decades since IBM developed the first mainframe computers. It consists of a processor that reads software instructions one by one and executes them. Each instruction will result in data being processed, for example by being added together; and data being stored in the main memory of the computer or being stored on some file-storage medium; or being sent to the Internet or to another computer. This is what is known as the von Neumann architecture; it was named after John von Neumann […]. His key idea, which still holds sway today, is that in a computer the data and the program are both stored in the computer’s memory in the same address space. There have been few challenges to the von Neumann architecture.”

[A] ‘neural network‘ […] consists of an input layer that can sense various signals from some environment […]. In the middle (hidden layer), there are a large number of processing elements (neurones) which are arranged into sub-layers. Finally, there is an output layer which provides a result […]. It is in the middle layer that the work is done in a neural computer. What happens is that the network is trained by giving it examples of the trend or item that is to be recognized. What the training does is to strengthen or weaken the connections between the processing elements in the middle layer until, when combined, they produce a strong signal when a new case is presented to them that matches the previously trained examples and a weak signal when an item that does not match the examples is encountered. Neural networks have been implemented in hardware, but most of the implementations have been via software where the middle layer has been implemented in chunks of code that carry out the learning process. […] although the initial impetus was to use ideas in neurobiology to develop neural architectures based on a consideration of processes in the brain, there is little resemblance between the internal data and software now used in commercial implementations and the human brain.”

Links:

Computer.
Byte. Bit.
Moore’s law.
Computer program.
Programming language. High-level programming language. Low-level programming language.
Zombie (computer science).
Therac-25.
Cloud computing.
Instructions per second.
ASCII.
Fetch-execute cycle.
Grace Hopper. Software Bug.
Transistor. Integrated circuit. Very-large-scale integration. Wafer (electronics). Photomask.
Read-only memory (ROM). Read-write memory (RWM). Bus (computing). Address bus. Programmable read-only memory (PROM). Erasable programmable read-only memory (EPROM). Electrically erasable programmable read-only memory (EEPROM). Flash memory. Dynamic random-access memory (DRAM). Static random-access memory (static RAM/SRAM).
Hard disc.
Miniaturization.
Wireless communication.
Radio-frequency identification (RFID).
Metadata.
NP-hardness. Set partition problem. Bin packing problem.
Routing.
Cray X-MP. Beowulf cluster.
Vector processor.
Folding@home.
Denial-of-service attack. Melissa (computer virus). Malware. Firewall (computing). Logic bomb. Fork bomb/rabbit virus. Cryptography. Caesar cipher. Social engineering (information security).
Application programming interface.
Data mining. Machine translation. Machine learning.
Functional programming.
Quantum computing.

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March 19, 2018 - Posted by | Books, Computer science, Cryptography, Engineering

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