Econstudentlog

Systems Biology (III)

Some observations from chapter 4 below:

The need to maintain a steady state ensuring homeostasis is an essential concern in nature while negative feedback loop is the fundamental way to ensure that this goal is met. The regulatory system determines the interdependences between individual cells and the organism, subordinating the former to the latter. In trying to maintain homeostasis, the organism may temporarily upset the steady state conditions of its component cells, forcing them to perform work for the benefit of the organism. […] On a cellular level signals are usually transmitted via changes in concentrations of reaction substrates and products. This simple mechanism is made possible due to limited volume of each cell. Such signaling plays a key role in maintaining homeostasis and ensuring cellular activity. On the level of the organism signal transmission is performed by hormones and the nervous system. […] Most intracellular signal pathways work by altering the concentrations of selected substances inside the cell. Signals are registered by forming reversible complexes consisting of a ligand (reaction product) and an allosteric receptor complex. When coupled to the ligand, the receptor inhibits the activity of its corresponding effector, which in turn shuts down the production of the controlled substance ensuring the steady state of the system. Signals coming from outside the cell are usually treated as commands (covalent modifications), forcing the cell to adjust its internal processes […] Such commands can arrive in the form of hormones, produced by the organism to coordinate specialized cell functions in support of general homeostasis (in the organism). These signals act upon cell receptors and are usually amplified before they reach their final destination (the effector).”

“Each concentration-mediated signal must first be registered by a detector. […] Intracellular detectors are typically based on allosteric proteins. Allosteric proteins exhibit a special property: they have two stable structural conformations and can shift from one form to the other as a result of changes in ligand concentrations. […] The concentration of a product (or substrate) which triggers structural realignment in the allosteric protein (such as a regulatory enzyme) depends on the genetically-determined affinity of the active site to its ligand. Low affinity results in high target concentration of the controlled substance while high affinity translates into lower concentration […]. In other words, high concentration of the product is necessary to trigger a low-affinity receptor (and vice versa). Most intracellular regulatory mechanisms rely on noncovalent interactions. Covalent bonding is usually associated with extracellular signals, generated by the organism and capable of overriding the cell’s own regulatory mechanisms by modifying the sensitivity of receptors […]. Noncovalent interactions may be compared to requests while covalent signals are treated as commands. Signals which do not originate in the receptor’s own feedback loop but modify its affinity are known as steering signals […] Hormones which act upon cells are, by their nature, steering signals […] Noncovalent interactions — dependent on substance concentrations — impose spatial restrictions on regulatory mechanisms. Any increase in cell volume requires synthesis of additional products in order to maintain stable concentrations. The volume of a spherical cell is given as V = 4/3 π r3, where r indicates cell radius. Clearly, even a slight increase in r translates into a significant increase in cell volume, diluting any products dispersed in the cytoplasm. This implies that cells cannot expand without incurring great energy costs. It should also be noted that cell expansion reduces the efficiency of intracellular regulatory mechanisms because signals and substrates need to be transported over longer distances. Thus, cells are universally small, regardless of whether they make up a mouse or an elephant.”

An effector is an element of a regulatory loop which counteracts changes in the regulated quantity […] Synthesis and degradation of biological compounds often involves numerous enzymes acting in sequence. The product of one enzyme is a substrate for another enzyme. With the exception of the initial enzyme, each step of this cascade is controlled by the availability of the supplied substrate […] The effector consists of a chain of enzymes, each of which depends on the activity of the initial regulatory enzyme […] as well as on the activity of its immediate predecessor which supplies it with substrates. The function of all enzymes in the effector chain is indirectly dependent on the initial enzyme […]. This coupling between the receptor and the first link in the effector chain is a universal phenomenon. It can therefore be said that the initial enzyme in the effector chain is, in fact, a regulatory enzyme. […] Most cell functions depend on enzymatic activity. […] It seems that a set of enzymes associated with a specific process which involves a negative feedback loop is the most typical form of an intracellular regulatory effector. Such effectors can be controlled through activation or inhibition of their associated enzymes.”

“The organism is a self-contained unit represented by automatic regulatory loops which ensure homeostasis. […] Effector functions are conducted by cells which are usually grouped and organized into tissues and organs. Signal transmission occurs by way of body fluids, hormones or nerve connections. Cells can be treated as automatic and potentially autonomous elements of regulatory loops, however their specific action is dependent on the commands issued by the organism. This coercive property of organic signals is an integral requirement of coordination, allowing the organism to maintain internal homeostasis. […] Activities of the organism are themselves regulated by their own negative feedback loops. Such regulation differs however from the mechanisms observed in individual cells due to its place in the overall hierarchy and differences in signal properties, including in particular:
• Significantly longer travel distances (compared to intracellular signals);
• The need to maintain hierarchical superiority of the organism;
• The relative autonomy of effector cells. […]
The relatively long distance travelled by organism’s signals and their dilution (compared to intracellular ones) calls for amplification. As a consequence, any errors or random distortions in the original signal may be drastically exacerbated. A solution to this problem comes in the form of encoding, which provides the signal with sufficient specificity while enabling it to be selectively amplified. […] a loudspeaker can […] assist in acoustic communication, but due to the lack of signal encoding it cannot compete with radios in terms of communication distance. The same reasoning applies to organism-originated signals, which is why information regarding blood glucose levels is not conveyed directly by glucose but instead by adrenalin, glucagon or insulin. Information encoding is handled by receptors and hormone-producing cells. Target cells are capable of decoding such signals, thus completing the regulatory loop […] Hormonal signals may be effectively amplified because the hormone itself does not directly participate in the reaction it controls — rather, it serves as an information carrier. […] strong amplification invariably requires encoding in order to render the signal sufficiently specific and unambiguous. […] Unlike organisms, cells usually do not require amplification in their internal regulatory loops — even the somewhat rare instances of intracellular amplification only increase signal levels by a small amount. Without the aid of an amplifier, messengers coming from the organism level would need to be highly concentrated at their source, which would result in decreased efficiency […] Most signals originated on organism’s level travel with body fluids; however if a signal has to reach its destination very rapidly (for instance in muscle control) it is sent via the nervous system”.

“Two types of amplifiers are observed in biological systems:
1. cascade amplifier,
2. positive feedback loop. […]
A cascade amplifier is usually a collection of enzymes which perform their action by activation in strict sequence. This mechanism resembles multistage (sequential) synthesis or degradation processes, however instead of exchanging reaction products, amplifier enzymes communicate by sharing activators or by directly activating one another. Cascade amplifiers are usually contained within cells. They often consist of kinases. […] Amplification effects occurring at each stage of the cascade contribute to its final result. […] While the kinase amplification factor is estimated to be on the order of 103, the phosphorylase cascade results in 1010-fold amplification. It is a stunning value, though it should also be noted that the hormones involved in this cascade produce particularly powerful effects. […] A positive feedback loop is somewhat analogous to a negative feedback loop, however in this case the input and output signals work in the same direction — the receptor upregulates the process instead of inhibiting it. Such upregulation persists until the available resources are exhausted.
Positive feedback loops can only work in the presence of a control mechanism which prevents them from spiraling out of control. They cannot be considered self-contained and only play a supportive role in regulation. […] In biological systems positive feedback loops are sometimes encountered in extracellular regulatory processes where there is a need to activate slowly-migrating components and greatly amplify their action in a short amount of time. Examples include blood coagulation and complement factor activation […] Positive feedback loops are often coupled to negative loop-based control mechanisms. Such interplay of loops may impart the signal with desirable properties, for instance by transforming a flat signals into a sharp spike required to overcome the activation threshold for the next stage in a signalling cascade. An example is the ejection of calcium ions from the endoplasmic reticulum in the phospholipase C cascade, itself subject to a negative feedback loop.”

“Strong signal amplification carries an important drawback: it tends to “overshoot” its target activity level, causing wild fluctuations in the process it controls. […] Nature has evolved several means of signal attenuation. The most typical mechanism superimposes two regulatory loops which affect the same parameter but act in opposite directions. An example is the stabilization of blood glucose levels by two contradictory hormones: glucagon and insulin. Similar strategies are exploited in body temperature control and many other biological processes. […] The coercive properties of signals coming from the organism carry risks associated with the possibility of overloading cells. The regulatory loop of an autonomous cell must therefore include an “off switch”, controlled by the cell. An autonomous cell may protect itself against excessive involvement in processes triggered by external signals (which usually incur significant energy expenses). […] The action of such mechanisms is usually timer-based, meaning that they inactivate signals following a set amount of time. […] The ability to interrupt signals protects cells from exhaustion. Uncontrolled hormone-induced activity may have detrimental effects upon the organism as a whole. This is observed e.g. in the case of the vibrio cholerae toxin which causes prolonged activation of intestinal epithelial cells by locking protein G in its active state (resulting in severe diarrhea which can dehydrate the organism).”

“Biological systems in which information transfer is affected by high entropy of the information source and ambiguity of the signal itself must include discriminatory mechanisms. These mechanisms usually work by eliminating weak signals (which are less specific and therefore introduce ambiguities). They create additional obstacles (thresholds) which the signals must overcome. A good example is the mechanism which eliminates the ability of weak, random antigens to activate lymphatic cells. It works by inhibiting blastic transformation of lymphocytes until a so-called receptor cap has accumulated on the surface of the cell […]. Only under such conditions can the activation signal ultimately reach the cell nucleus […] and initiate gene transcription. […] weak, reversible nonspecific interactions do not permit sufficient aggregation to take place. This phenomenon can be described as a form of discrimination against weak signals. […] Discrimination may also be linked to effector activity. […] Cell division is counterbalanced by programmed cell death. The most typical example of this process is apoptosis […] Each cell is prepared to undergo controlled death if required by the organism, however apoptosis is subject to tight control. Cells protect themselves against accidental triggering of the process via IAP proteins. Only strong proapoptotic signals may overcome this threshold and initiate cellular suicide”.

Simply knowing the sequences, structures or even functions of individual proteins does not provide sufficient insight into the biological machinery of living organisms. The complexity of individual cells and entire organisms calls for functional classification of proteins. This task can be accomplished with a proteome — a theoretical construct where individual elements (proteins) are grouped in a way which acknowledges their mutual interactions and interdependencies, characterizing the information pathways in a complex organism.
Most ongoing proteome construction projects focus on individual proteins as the basic building blocks […] [We would instead argue in favour of a model in which] [t]he basic unit of the proteome is one negative feedback loop (rather than a single protein) […]
Due to the relatively large number of proteins (between 25 and 40 thousand in the human organism), presenting them all on a single graph with vertex lengths corresponds to the relative duration of interactions would be unfeasible. This is why proteomes are often subdivided into functional subgroups such as the metabolome (proteins involved in metabolic processes), interactome (complex-forming proteins), kinomes (proteins which belong to the kinase family) etc.”

February 18, 2018 - Posted by | Biology, Books, Chemistry, Genetics, Medicine, Molecular biology

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: