Econstudentlog

Endocrinology (part I – thyroid)

Handbooks like these are difficult to blog, but I decided to try anyway. The first 100 pages or so of the book deals with the thyroid gland. Some observations of interest below.

“Biosynthesis of thyroid hormones requires iodine as substrate. […] The thyroid is the only source of T4. The thyroid secretes 20% of circulating T3; the remainder is generated in extraglandular tissues by the conversion of T4 to T3 […] In the blood, T4 and T3 are almost entirely bound to plasma proteins. […] Only the free or unbound hormone is available to tissues. The metabolic state correlates more closely with the free than the total hormone concentration in the plasma. The relatively weak binding of T3 accounts for its more rapid onset and offset of action. […] The levels of thyroid hormone in the blood are tightly controlled by feedback mechanisms involved in the hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis“.

“Annual check of thyroid function [is recommended] in the annual review of diabetic patients.”

“The term thyrotoxicosis denotes the clinical, physiological, and biochemical findings that result when the tissues are exposed to excess thyroid hormone. It can arise in a variety of ways […] It is essential to establish a specific diagnosis […] The term hyperthyroidism should be used to denote only those conditions in which hyperfunction of the thyroid leads to thyrotoxicosis. […] [Thyrotoxicosis is] 10 x more common in ♀ than in ♂ in the UK. Prevalence is approximately 2% of the ♀ population. […] Subclinical hyperthyroidism is defined as low serum thyrotropin (TSH) concentration in patients with normal levels of T4 and T3. Subtle symptoms and signs of thyrotoxicosis may be present. […] There is epidemiological evidence that subclinical hyperthyroidism is a risk factor for the development of atrial fibrillation or osteoporosis.1 Meta-analyses suggest a 41% increase in all-cause mortality.2 […] Thyroid crisis [storm] represents a rare, but life-threatening, exacerbation of the manifestations of thyrotoxicosis. […] the condition is associated with a significant mortality (30-50%, depending on series) […]. Thyroid crisis develops in hyperthyroid patients who: *Have an acute infection. *Undergo thyroidal or non-thyroidal surgery or (rarely) radioiodine treatment.”

“[Symptoms and signs of hyperthyroidism (all forms):] *Hyperactivity, irritability, altered mood, insomnia. *Heat intolerance, sweating. […] *Fatigue, weakness. *Dyspnoea. *Weight loss with appetite (weight gain in 10% of patients). *Pruritus. […] *Thirst and polyuria. *Oligomenorrhoea or amenorrhoea, loss of libido, erectile dysfunction (50% of men may have sexual dysfunction). *Warm, moist skin. […] *Hair loss. *Muscle weakness and wasting. […] Manifestations of Graves’s disease (in addition to [those factors already mentioned include:]) *Diffuse goitre. *Ophthalmopathy […] A feeling of grittiness and discomfort in the eye. *Retrobulbar pressure or pain, eyelid lag or retraction. […] *Exophthalmos (proptosis) […] Optic neuropathy.”

“Two alternative regimens are practiced for Graves’s disease: dose titration and block and replace. […] The [primary] aim [of the dose titration regime] is to achieve a euthyroid state with relatively high drug doses and then to maintain euthyroidism with a low stable dose. […] This regimen has a lower rate of side effects than the block and replace regimen. The treatment is continued for 18 months, as this appears to represent the length of therapy which is generally optimal in producing the remission rate of up to 40% at 5 years after discontinuing therapy. *Relapses are most likely to occur within the first year […] Men have a higher recurrence rate than women. *Patients with multinodular goitres and thyrotoxicosis always relapse on cessation of antithyroid medication, and definite treatment with radioiodine or surgery is usually advised. […] Block and replace regimen *After achieving a euthyroid state on carbimazole alone, carbimazole at a dose of 40mg daily, together with T4 at a dose of 100 micrograms, can be prescribed. This is usually continued for 6 months. *The main advantages are fewer hospital visits for checks of thyroid function and shorter duration of treatment.”

“Radioiodine treatment[:] Indications: *Definite treatment of multinodular goitre or adenoma. *Relapsed Graves’s disease. […] *Radioactive iodine-131 is administered orally as a capsule or a drink. *There is no universal agreement regarding the optimal dose. […] The recommendation is to administer enough radioiodine to achieve euthyroidism, with the acceptance of a moderate rate of hypothyroidism, e.g. 15-20% at 2 years. […] In general, 50-70% of patients have restored normal thyroid function within 6-8 weeks of receiving radioiodine. […] The prevalence of hypothyroidism is about 50% at 10 years and continues to increase thereafter.”

“Thyrotoxicosis occurs in about 0.2% of pregnancies. […] *Diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis during pregnancy may be difficult or delayed. *Physiological changes of pregnancy are similar to those of hyperthyroidism. […] 5-7% of ♀ develop biochemical evidence of thyroid dysfunction after delivery. An incidence is seen in patients with type I diabetes mellitus (25%) […] One-third of affected ♀ with post-partum thyroiditis develop symptoms of hypothyroidism […] There is a suggestion of an risk of post-partum depression in those with hypothyroidism. […] *The use of iodides and radioiodine is contraindicated in pregnancy. *Surgery is rarely performed in pregnancy. It is reserved for patients not responding to ATDs [antithyroid drugs, US]. […] Hyperthyroid ♀ who want to conceive should attain euthyroidism before conception since uncontrolled hyperthyroidism is associated with an an risk of congenital abnormalities (stillbirth and cranial synostosis are the most serious complications).”

“Nodular thyroid disease denotes the presence of single or multiple palpable or non-palpable nodules within the thyroid gland. […] *Clinically apparent thyroid nodules are evident in ~5% of the UK population. […] Thyroid nodules always raise the concern of cancer, but <5% are cancerous. […] clinically detectable thyroid cancer is rare. It accounts for <1% of all cancer and <0.5% of cancer deaths. […] Thyroid cancers are commonest in adults aged 40-50 and rare in children [incidence of 0.2-5 per million per year] and adolescents. […] History should concentrate on: *An enlarging thyroid mass. *A previous history of radiation […] family history of thyroid cancer. *The development of hoarseness or dysphagia. *Nodules are more likely to be malignant in patients <20 or >60 years. *Thyroid nodules are more common in ♀ but more likely to be malignant in ♂. […] Physical findings suggestive of malignancy include a firm or hard, non-tender nodule, a recent history of enlargement, fixation to adjacent tissue, and the presence of regional lymphadenopathy. […] Thyroid nodules may be described as adenomas if the follicular cell differentiation is enclosed within a capsule; adenomatous when the lesions are circumscribed but not encapsulated. *The most common benign thyroid tumours are the nodules of multinodular goitres (colloid nodules) and follicular adenomas. […] Autonomously functioning thyroid adenomas (or nodules) are benign tumours that produce thyroid hormone. Clinically, they present as a single nodule that is hyperfunctioning […], sometimes causing hyperthyroidism.”

“Inflammation of the thyroid gland often leads to a transient thyrotoxicosis followed by hypothyroidism. Overt hypothyroidism caused by autoimmunity has two main forms: Hashimoto’s (goitrous) thyroiditis and atrophic thyroiditis. […] Hashimoto’s thyroiditis [is] [c]haracterized by a painless, variable-sized goitre with rubbery consistency and an irregular surface. […] Occasionally, patients present with thyrotoxicosis in association with a thyroid gland that is unusually firm […] Atrophic thyroiditis [p]robably indicates end-stage thyroid disease. These patients do not have goitre and are antibody [positive]. […] The long-term prognosis of patients with chronic thyroiditis is good because hypothyroidism can easily be corrected with T4 and the goitre is usually not of sufficient size to cause local symptoms. […] there is an association between this condition and thyroid lymphoma (rare, but risk by a factor of 70).”

“Hypothyroidism results from a variety of abnormalities that cause insufficient secretion of thyroid hormones […] The commonest cause is autoimmune thyroid disease. Myxoedema is severe hypothyroidism [which leads to] thickening of the facial features and a doughy induration of the skin. [The clinical picture of hypothyroidism:] *Insidious, non-specific onset. *Fatigue, lethargy, constipation, cold intolerance, muscle stiffness, cramps, carpal tunnel syndrome […] *Slowing of intellectual and motor activities. *↓ appetite and weight gain. *Dry skin; hair loss. […] [The term] [s]ubclinical hypothyroidism […] is used to denote raised TSH levels in the presence of normal concentrations of free thyroid hormones. *Treatment is indicated if the biochemistry is sustained in patients with a past history of radioiodine treatment for thyrotoxicosis or [positive] thyroid antibodies as, in these situations, progression to overt hypothyroidism is almost inevitable […] There is controversy over the advantages of T4 treatment in patients with [negative] thyroid antibodies and no previous radioiodine treatment. *If treatment is not given, follow-up with annual thyroid function tests is important. *There is no generally accepted consensus of when patients should receive treatment. […] *Thyroid hormone replacement with synthetic levothyroxine remains the treatment of choice in primary hypothyroidism. […] levothyroxine has a narrow therapeutic index […] Elevated TSH despite thyroxine replacement is common, most usually due to lack of compliance.”

 

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January 8, 2018 - Posted by | Books, Cancer/oncology, Diabetes, Medicine, Ophthalmology, Pharmacology

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