Econstudentlog

A few diabetes papers of interest

i. An Inverse Relationship Between Age of Type 2 Diabetes Onset and Complication Risk and Mortality: The Impact of Youth-Onset Type 2 Diabetes.

“This study compared the prevalence of complications in 354 patients with T2DM diagnosed between 15 and 30 years of age (T2DM15–30) with that in a duration-matched cohort of 1,062 patients diagnosed between 40 and 50 years (T2DM40–50). It also examined standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) according to diabetes age of onset in 15,238 patients covering a wider age-of-onset range.”

“After matching for duration, despite their younger age, T2DM15–30 had more severe albuminuria (P = 0.004) and neuropathy scores (P = 0.003). T2DM15–30 were as commonly affected by metabolic syndrome factors as T2DM40–50 but less frequently treated for hypertension and dyslipidemia (P < 0.0001). An inverse relationship between age of diabetes onset and SMR was seen, which was the highest for T2DM15–30 (3.4 [95% CI 2.7–4.2]). SMR plots adjusting for duration show that for those with T2DM15–30, SMR is the highest at any chronological age, with a peak SMR of more than 6 in early midlife. In contrast, mortality for older-onset groups approximates that of the background population.”

“Young people with type 2 diabetes are likely to be obese, with a clustering of unfavorable cardiometabolic risk factors all present at a very early age (3,4). In adolescents with type 2 diabetes, a 10–30% prevalence of hypertension and an 18–54% prevalence of dyslipidemia have been found, much greater than would be expected in a population of comparable age (4).”

CONCLUSIONS The negative effect of diabetes on morbidity and mortality is greatest for those diagnosed at a young age compared with T2DM of usual onset.”

It’s important to keep base rates in mind when interpreting the reported SMRs, but either way this is interesting.

ii. Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Hypoglycemia-Induced Cognitive Impairment and Recovery in Adults With Type 1 Diabetes.

OBJECTIVE To ascertain whether hypoglycemia in association with sleep deprivation causes greater cognitive dysfunction than hypoglycemia alone and protracts cognitive recovery after normoglycemia is restored.”

CONCLUSIONS Hypoglycemia per se produced a significant decrement in cognitive function; coexisting sleep deprivation did not have an additive effect. However, after restoration of normoglycemia, preceding sleep deprivation was associated with persistence of hypoglycemic symptoms and greater and more prolonged cognitive dysfunction during the recovery period. […] In the current study of young adults with type 1 diabetes, the impairment of cognitive function that was associated with hypoglycemia was not exacerbated by sleep deprivation. […] One possible explanation is that hypoglycemia per se exerts a ceiling effect on the degree of cognitive dysfunction as is possible to demonstrate with conventional tests.”

iii. Intensive Diabetes Treatment and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Type 1 Diabetes: The DCCT/EDIC Study 30-Year Follow-up.

“The DCCT randomly assigned 1,441 patients with type 1 diabetes to intensive versus conventional therapy for a mean of 6.5 years, after which 93% were subsequently monitored during the observational Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) study. Cardiovascular disease (nonfatal myocardial infarction and stroke, cardiovascular death, confirmed angina, congestive heart failure, and coronary artery revascularization) was adjudicated using standardized measures.”

“During 30 years of follow-up in DCCT and EDIC, 149 cardiovascular disease events occurred in 82 former intensive treatment group subjects versus 217 events in 102 former conventional treatment group subjects. Intensive therapy reduced the incidence of any cardiovascular disease by 30% (95% CI 7, 48; P = 0.016), and the incidence of major cardiovascular events (nonfatal myocardial infarction, stroke, or cardiovascular death) by 32% (95% CI −3, 56; P = 0.07). The lower HbA1c levels during the DCCT/EDIC statistically account for all of the observed treatment effect on cardiovascular disease risk.”

CONCLUSIONS Intensive diabetes therapy during the DCCT (6.5 years) has long-term beneficial effects on the incidence of cardiovascular disease in type 1 diabetes that persist for up to 30 years.”

I was of course immediately thinking that perhaps they had not considered if this might just be the result of the Hba1c differences achieved during the trial being maintained long-term (during follow-up), and so what they were doing was not as much measuring the effect of the ‘metabolic memory’ component as they were just measuring standard population outcome differences resulting from long-term Hba1c differences. But they (of course) had thought about that, and that’s not what’s going on here, which is what makes it particularly interesting:

“Mean HbA1c during the average 6.5 years of DCCT intensive therapy was ∼2% (20 mmol/mol) lower than that during conventional therapy (7.2 vs. 9.1% [55.6 vs. 75.9 mmol/mol], P < 0.001). Subsequently during EDIC, HbA1c differences between the treatment groups dissipated. At year 11 of EDIC follow-up and most recently at 19–20 years of EDIC follow-up, there was only a trivial difference between the original intensive and conventional treatment groups in the mean level of HbA1c

They do admittedly find a statistically significant difference between the Hba1cs of the two groups when you look at (weighted) Hba1cs long-term, but that difference is certainly nowhere near large enough to explain the clinical differences in outcomes you observe. Another argument in favour of the view that what’s driving these differences is metabolic memory is the observation that the difference in outcomes between the treatment and control groups are smaller now than they were ten years ago (my default would probably be to if anything expect the outcomes of the two groups to converge long-term if the samples were properly randomized to start with, but this is not the only plausible model and it sort of depends on how you model the risk function, as they also talk about in the paper):

“[T]he risk reduction of any CVD with intensive therapy through 2013 is now less than that reported previously through 2004 (30% [P = 0.016] vs. 47% [P = 0.005]), and likewise, the risk reduction per 10% lower mean HbA1c through 2013 was also somewhat lower than previously reported but still highly statistically significant (17% [P = 0.0001] vs. 20% [P = 0.001]).”

iv. Commonly Measured Clinical Variables Are Not Associated With Burden of Complications in Long-standing Type 1 Diabetes: Results From the Canadian Study of Longevity in Diabetes.

“The Canadian Study of Longevity in Diabetes actively recruited 325 individuals who had T1D for 50 or more years (5). Subjects completed a questionnaire, and recent laboratory tests and eye reports were provided by primary care physicians and eye specialists, respectively. […] The 325 participants were 65.5 ± 8.5 years old with diagnosis at age 10 years (interquartile range [IQR] 6.0, 16) and duration of 54.9 ± 6.4 years.”

“In univariable analyses, the following were significantly associated with a greater burden of complications: presence of hypertension, statin, aspirin and ACE inhibitor or ARB use, higher Problem Areas in Diabetes (PAID) and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) scores, and higher levels of triglycerides and HbA1c. The following were significantly associated with a lower burden of complications: current physical activity, higher quality of life, and higher HDL cholesterol.”

“In the multivariable analysis, a higher PAID score was associated with a greater burden of complications (risk ratio [RR] 1.15 [95% CI 1.06–1.25] for each 10-point-higher score). Aspirin and statin use were also associated with a greater burden of complications (RR 1.24 [95% CI 1.01–1.52] and RR 1.34 [95% CI 1.05–1.70], respectively) (Table 1), whereas HbA1c was not.”

“Our findings indicate that in individuals with long-standing T1D, burden of complications is largely not associated with historical characteristics or simple objective measurements, as associations with statistical significance likely reflect reverse causality. Notably, HbA1c was not associated with burden of complications […]. This further confirms that other unmeasured variables such as genetic, metabolic, or physiologic characteristics may best identify mechanisms and biomarkers of complications in long-standing T1D.”

v. Cardiovascular Risk Factor Targets and Cardiovascular Disease Event Risk in Diabetes: A Pooling Project of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study, Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, and Jackson Heart Study.

“Controlling cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in diabetes mellitus (DM) reduces the number of CVD events, but the effects of multifactorial risk factor control are not well quantified. We examined whether being at targets for blood pressure (BP), LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) together are associated with lower risks for CVD events in U.S. adults with DM. […] We studied 2,018 adults, 28–86 years of age with DM but without known CVD, from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), and Jackson Heart Study (JHS). Cox regression examined coronary heart disease (CHD) and CVD events over a mean 11-year follow-up in those individuals at BP, LDL-C, and HbA1c target levels, and by the number of controlled risk factors.”

“Of 2,018 DM subjects (43% male, 55% African American), 41.8%, 32.1%, and 41.9% were at target levels for BP, LDL-C, and HbA1c, respectively; 41.1%, 26.5%, and 7.2% were at target levels for any one, two, or all three factors, respectively. Being at BP, LDL-C, or HbA1c target levels related to 17%, 33%, and 37% lower CVD risks and 17%, 41%, and 36% lower CHD risks, respectively (P < 0.05 to P < 0.0001, except for BP in CHD risk); those subjects with one, two, or all three risk factors at target levels (vs. none) had incrementally lower adjusted risks of CVD events of 36%, 52%, and 62%, respectively, and incrementally lower adjusted risks of CHD events of 41%, 56%, and 60%, respectively (P < 0.001 to P < 0.0001). Propensity score adjustment showed similar findings.”

“In our pooled analysis of subjects with DM in three large-scale U.S. prospective studies, the more factors among HbA1c, BP, and LDL-C that were at goal levels, the lower are the observed CHD and CVD risks (∼60% lower when all three factors were at goal levels compared with none). However, fewer than one-tenth of our subjects were at goal levels for all three factors. These findings underscore the value of achieving target or lower levels of these modifiable risk factors, especially in combination, among persons with DM for the future prevention of CHD and CVD events.”

In some studies you see very low proportions of patients reaching target variables because the targets are stupid (to be perfectly frank about it). The HbA1c target applied in this study was a level <53.0 mmol/mol (7%), which is definitely not crazy if the majority of the individuals included were type 2, which they almost certainly were. You can argue about the BP goal, but it’s obvious here that the authors are perfectly aware of the contentiousness of this variable.

It’s incidentally noteworthy – and the authors do take note of it, of course – that one of the primary results of this study (~60% lower risk when all risk factors reach the target goal), which includes a large proportion of African Americans in the study sample, is almost identical to the results of the Danish Steno-2 clinical trial, which included only Danish white patients (and the results of which I have discussed here on the blog before). In the Steno study, the result was “a 57% reduction in CVD death and a 59% reduction in CVD events.”

vi. Illness Identity in Adolescents and Emerging Adults With Type 1 Diabetes: Introducing the Illness Identity Questionnaire.

“The current study examined the utility of a new self-report questionnaire, the Illness Identity Questionnaire (IIQ), which assesses the concept of illness identity, or the degree to which type 1 diabetes is integrated into one’s identity. Four illness identity dimensions (engulfment, rejection, acceptance, and enrichment) were validated in adolescents and emerging adults with type 1 diabetes. Associations with psychological and diabetes-specific functioning were assessed.”

“A sample of 575 adolescents and emerging adults (14–25 years of age) with type 1 diabetes completed questionnaires on illness identity, psychological functioning, diabetes-related problems, and treatment adherence. Physicians were contacted to collect HbA1c values from patients’ medical records. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted to validate the IIQ. Path analysis with structural equation modeling was used to examine associations between illness identity and psychological and diabetes-specific functioning.”

“The first two identity dimensions, engulfment and rejection, capture a lack of illness integration, or the degree to which having diabetes is not well integrated as part of one’s sense of self. Engulfment refers to the degree to which diabetes dominates a person’s identity. Individuals completely define themselves in terms of their diabetes, which invades all domains of life (9). Rejection refers to the degree to which diabetes is rejected as part of one’s identity and is viewed as a threat or as unacceptable to the self. […] Acceptance refers to the degree to which individuals accept diabetes as a part of their identity, besides other social roles and identity assets. […] Enrichment refers to the degree to which having diabetes results in positive life changes, benefits one’s identity, and enables one to grow as a person (12). […] These changes can manifest themselves in different ways, including an increased appreciation for life, a change of life priorities, and a more positive view of the self (14).”

“Previous quantitative research assessing similar constructs has suggested that the degree to which individuals integrate their illness into their identity may affect psychological and diabetes-specific functioning in patients. Diabetes intruding upon all domains of life (similar to engulfment) [has been] related to more depressive symptoms and more diabetes-related problems […] In contrast, acceptance has been related to fewer depressive symptoms and diabetes-related problems and to better glycemic control (6,15). Similarly, benefit finding has been related to fewer depressive symptoms and better treatment adherence (16). […] The current study introduces the IIQ in individuals with type 1 diabetes as a way to assess all four illness identity dimensions.”

“The Cronbach α was 0.90 for engulfment, 0.84 for rejection, 0.85 for acceptance, and 0.90 for enrichment. […] CFA indicated that the IIQ has a clear factor structure, meaningfully differentiating four illness identity dimensions. Rejection was related to worse treatment adherence and higher HbA1c values. Engulfment was related to less adaptive psychological functioning and more diabetes-related problems. Acceptance was related to more adaptive psychological functioning, fewer diabetes-related problems, and better treatment adherence. Enrichment was related to more adaptive psychological functioning. […] the concept of illness identity may help to clarify why certain adolescents and emerging adults with diabetes show difficulties in daily functioning, whereas others succeed in managing developmental and diabetes-specific challenges.”

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June 30, 2017 - Posted by | Cardiology, Diabetes, Medicine, Psychology, Studies

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