Econstudentlog

Quotes

i. “Self-love is often rather arrogant than blind; it does not hide our faults from ourselves, but persuades us that they escape the notice of others.” (Samuel Johnson)

ii. “So much are the modes of excellence settled by time and place, that men may be heard boasting in one street of that which they would anxiously conceal in another.” (-ll-)

iii. “The greatest of faults, I should say, is to be conscious of none.” (Thomas Carlyle)

iv. “Like most of those who study history, he learned from the mistakes of the past how to make new ones.” (Alan John Percivale Taylor)

v. “A method of reasoning may lead to conclusions which are invariably true, even though it start from false premises.” (Francesco Maria Zanotti)

vi. “We are much harder on people who betray us in small ways than on people who betray others in great ones.” (Rochefoucauld)

vii. “Most people are good only so long as they believe others so.” (Friedrich Hebbel)

viii. “Men are more ready to offend one who desires to be beloved than one who wishes to be feared.” (Niccolò Machiavelli)

ix. “Some have been thought brave because they were afraid to run away.” (Thomas Fuller)

x. “Calumny is like counterfeit money: many people who would not coin it circulate it without qualms.” (Diane De Poitiers)

xi. “Let us leave the labels to those who have little else wherewith to cover their nakedness.” (Walter Sickert)

xii. “…there are few truths important enough to justify paining and reproving others for not knowing them…” (Montesquieu)

xiii. “To make astute people believe one is what one is not is, in most cases, harder than actually to become what one wishes to appear.” (Georg Christoph Lichtenberg)

xiv. “It is a trick among the dishonest to offer sacrifices that are not needed, or not possible, to avoid making those that are required.” (Ivan Goncharov)

xv. “It is seldom that the miserable can help regarding their misery as a wrong inflicted by those who are less miserable” (George Eliot)

xvi. “Thousands upon thousands are yearly brought into a state of real poverty by their great anxiety not to be thought poor.” (William Cobbett)

xvii. “The woman whose behavior indicates that she will make a scene if she is told the truth asks to be deceived.” (Elizabeth Jenkins)

xviii. “My business is to teach my aspirations to confirm themselves to facts, not to try and make facts harmonize with my aspirations.” (Thomas Henry Huxley)

xix. “The art of doing mathematics consists in finding that special case which contains all the germs of generality.” (David Hilbert)

xx. “”Obvious” is the most dangerous word in mathematics.” (Eric Temple Bell)

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April 15, 2017 Posted by | Quotes/aphorisms | Leave a comment

Words

Lately I’ve been reading some of George MacDonald Fraser’s Flashman books, which have been quite enjoyable reads in general; I’m reading the books in the order in which the actions in the books supposedly took place, not in the order in which the books were published, and a large number of the words included below are words I encountered in the first three of the books I read (i.e. FlashmanRoyal Flash, and Flashman’s Lady); I decided the post already at that point included a large number of words (the post includes roughly 120 words), so I saw no need to add additional words from the other books in the series in this post as well. I have reviewed a few of the Flashman books I’ve read on goodreads here, here, and here.

Havildar, gimbal, quorum, unmannerly, tribulation, thalassophobia, kiln, sheave, grody, contemn, arcanum, deloping, poulterer, fossorial, catamount, guttersnipe, nabob, frond, matelot, jetty.

Sangar, palliasse, junoesque, cornet, bugle, fettle, toady, thong, trollop, sepoy, wattle, hardtack, snuffle, chunter, ghillie, barker, trousseau, simper, madcap, ramrod.

Welt, landau, declaim, burgomaster, scupper, windlass, maunder, sniffy, sirdar, randy, dowager, toffs, pug, curvet, pish, scriveners, hoyden, manikin, lecher/lechery, busby.

Ruck, leery, ninny, shillyshally, mincing, ringlet, covey, pip, munshi, risaldar, maidan, palankeen/palanquin, forbye, feringhee, cantonment, puggaree, pannikin, dollymop, snook, cordage.

Suet/suety, strumpet, kenspeckle, magsman, scrag, chandler, prigger, chivvy, décolleté, dundrearies, assignation, bruit, purblind, trull, slatterncoffle, doggo, cellarette, cummerbund, agley.

Sampan, wideawake, popsycollation, déshabillé, pinnace, pennant, murk, sprig, linstock, tassel, bangle, trammel, prau, shellback, shako, clobbertaffrail, crinolinetaffeta, commonalty.

April 15, 2017 Posted by | Books, Language | Leave a comment