Econstudentlog

Diabetes and the Metabolic Syndrome in Mental Health (II)

Here’s my first post about the book. This will be my last post about the book. In the coverage below I’ll include some quotes from the second half of the publication, as well as some comments.

“To date, no prospective study has directly compared the efficacy and tolerability of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin/ norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), or other second-generation antidepressants in patients with diabetes versus patients without diabetes.”

“Weight is a common and well-known adverse effect of short-term and long-term treatment with TCAs, primarily as a result of excessive appetite. […] weight gain is the most common cause for premature discontinuation of all TCAs. […] TCAs are […] likely to impair diabetes control, because they increase serum glucose levels by up to 150%, increase appetite (particularly carbohydrate craving), and reduce the metabolic rate. […] SSRIs have been associated with both weight gain and weight loss. […] Weight gain is less likely with SSRIs when they are used short term — for 6 months or less. Contradictory evidence exists about whether an increase in body weight occurs in patients using SSRIs for 1 year or longer. […] The mean incidence of weight gain across comparative randomized controlled trials ranges from 4.1% for fluoxetine, 7.6% for sertraline, and 9.6% for paroxetine. […] SSRIs may reduce serum glucose by up to 30% and cause appetite suppression, resulting in weight loss. Fluoxetine should be used cautiously in patients with diabetes, because of its increased potential for hypoglycemia […]. Its side effects of tremor, nausea, sweating, and anxiety may also be misinterpreted as due to hypoglycemia.”

“Prior to the development of the second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs), or atypical antipsychotics, phenothiazines were the dominant therapy for schizophrenia. Numerous studies at this time began documenting that the use of phenothiazines led to aggravation of preexisting diabetes and the development of new-onset type 2 diabetes. […] high-potency neuroleptics […] appeared to be less implicated in the development of diabetes. These drugs eventually became the predominant form of therapy for schizophrenia […] Unfortunately, the high-potency neuroleptics are also associated with a high rate of occurrence of extrapyramidal symptoms, tardive dyskinesia, and subsequent noncompliance […]  In the late 1980s, a new class of antipsychotics, the thiobenzodiazepines or “atypical antipsychotics,” was introduced. […] One major advantage of these agents was a marked reduction in the occurrence of extrapyramidal symptoms. […] However, the atypical antipsychotics have also proven to carry their own unique side-effect profile. Side effects include substantial weight gain […] lipid abnormalities […] Hyperglycemia and diabetes are strongly associated with some of the newer atypical antipsychotics […] Thus, many psychiatrists are finding themselves in the difficult position of trading efficacy in the treatment of schizophrenia for an array of adverse metabolic side effects.”

“Weight gain is one of the more noticeable effects of all of the psychotropics. Although the SGAs appear to be a major culprit, TCAs, lithium, and mood stabilizers such as valproic acid or divalproex sodium and carbamazepine are also associated with weight gain. […] A range of evidence suggests that treatment with certain antipsychotic medications is associated with an increased risk of insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, and type 2 diabetes, compared with no treatment or treatment with alternative antipsychotics. […] A growing body of evidence supports the key observation that treatments producing the greatest increases in body weight and adiposity are also associated with a consistent pattern of clinically significant adverse effects on insulin resistance and changes in blood glucose and lipid levels. However, there are a growing number of cases of antipsychotic-associated hyperglycemia that involve patients without substantial weight gain, and reports that involve patients who improve when the offending agent is discontinued or who experience deterioration of glycemic control when re-challenged with the drug. […] Antipsychotics may lead to diabetes in susceptible individuals by causing decreased insulin secretion, increased insulin resistance, or a combination of both. Data suggest, however, that insulin resistance is primarily the responsible mechanism. […] The mechanism through which antipsychotics lead to insulin resistance is not clear.

“Many drugs may influence glucose insulin homeostasis. Commonly prescribed drugs that may have adverse effects on carbohydrate metabolism, especially in patients with diabetes mellitus or those at risk of developing glucose intolerance, include diuretics, beta-blockers, sympathomimetics, corticosteroids, and sex hormones”.

The book’s Table 4.11 include a really nice list of drugs, or drug classes, that can increase blood glucose levels, which includes quite a few commonly used drugs. A couple of to me surprising culprits on that list were marijuana and oral contraceptives; the oral contraceptives one certainly makes a lot of sense in retrospect (I don’t really know much about the metabolism of marijuana/cannabis, all I’ve ever learned about that stuff includes what was covered in the appendix of Coleman’s excellent textbook – and I have no personal experience…), I just hadn’t thought about the fact that very commonly used drugs like these may also have side effects of this nature).

“Patients with depression or bipolar depression may lack interest in their well-being and suffer from difficulty maintaining focus. Furthermore, many depressed patients suffer from decreased energy, psychomotor retardation, and changes in appetite, which may further promote weight gain. All of these make it very challenging to successfully implement a weight loss program in depressed patients. […] In addition, many patients with mental illnesses such as depression […] often state that eating is one of the few highlights of their day.” (So it’s probably a good idea to avoid giving these people drugs which will cause them to gain a substantial amount of weight/increase appetite/increase carbohydrate cravings, to the extent that this is possible…)

“Diabetes is considered a coronary artery disease equivalent by the National Cholesterol Education Panel (NCEP) […] Aspirin therapy is considered a routine part of secondary prevention in people with diabetes and a history of cardiovascular disease, and it is also recommended as part of primary prevention for cardiovascular disease in all patients with diabetes older than 40 years of age; additionally treatment with 75 to 325 mg/day of aspirin should be considered in patients 30 to 40 years of age with one additional cardiovascular risk factor.1,13 […] for all people older than 40 years of age with diabetes, statin therapy is recommended to lower the LDL by 30% to 40%, regardless of baseline levels.14 […] Lowering triglycerides to levels less than 150 mg/dL also confers cardiovascular benefit.1,14 However, hyperglycemia and hypertriglyceridemia are intricately linked, likely through elevations of free fatty acids. Free fatty acids are potent inhibitors of insulin action and transport, and act to disrupt glucose transport into skeletal muscle. Thus, triglyceride goals are often difficult to attain in uncontrolled diabetes.”

In some weird way some aspects of the last part of the book’s coverage was quite funny. So you have a diabetic whose disease has caused extensive damage to the nervous system leading to painful neuropathy. How do you treat the (in general difficult to treat) symptoms of neuropathy? Why, you give him tricyclic antidepressants (which will of course make his diabetes harder to treat, and cause him to gain weight). No, I’m not making this up:

“The most widely used medical treatments for symptoms of diabetic neuropathy include gabapentin and tricyclic antidepressants.”

Or how about this one – you have a type 2 diabetic who’s most likely overweight and who could probably benefit quite a bit from losing weight; why, let’s treat his diabetes with a drug that causes him to gain weight! People actually do this: “Thiazolidinediones (rosiglitazone, pioglitazone) act as agonists of the peroxisome proliferator-activator receptor gamma and improve insulin sensitivity at the tissue level. These agents are contraindicated in patients with heart failure and can worsen peripheral edema. Unfortunately, a common side effect of the glitazone class of agents is weight gain.” They’re not first-line agents, but they are used in diabetics. Just to make things even better, these drugs also seem to increase the risk of osteoporosis, a risk which is already somewhat elevated in type 2 diabetics: “Additionally, these drugs [thiazolidinediones] appear to decrease appendicular bone mass with associated increased risk of fractures.34

…or perhaps now some people might start thinking here: ‘Is stuff like this actually part of the explanation for Vestergaard’s findings described in the link above?’ I should add to these people that this is unlikely to be the case, especially considering the big difference between the (really quite substantial) type 1- and (significantly lower) type 2 fracture risk elevation; thiazolidinediones are not used in the treatment of type 1, and it’s not even a first-line treatment of type 2 – other explanations, such as those covered in Czernik & Fowlkes’s text, seem much more likely to matter (though in the context of a few individuals these drugs may still be of relevance).

“In addition to glycemic goals, nonglycemic treatment goals of blood pressure control, lipid management, and initiation of aspirin therapy are often necessary. For many patients, the diagnosis of diabetes results in multidrug therapy. For patients with mental illness who are likely to already be on multiple medications, the addition of several new agents can be difficult. Several studies have suggested that medication adherence in patients with psychiatric illness is poor at baseline,38 and may worsen when an increasing number of medications are prescribed.”

It’s also worth remembering here that “asymptomatic and chronic diseases needing long-term treatment […] result in poorer compliance”, although on the other hand “patient-controlled non-compliance [is] lower in treatment for diseases in which the relationship between non-compliance and recurrence is very clear, such as diabetes, compared to treatment for diseases in which this relationship is less clear” (Kermani and Davies). Combine psychiatric disease with chronic illnesses of a different kind and potential polypharmacy and non-compliance certainly becomes an issue worth taking into account when considering what might be the optimal treatment regime. It’s also worth keeping in mind that even in people without psychiatric problems adherence tends to be low in the case of antihypertensives and lipid-lowering drugs – again I refer to Kermani and Davies’ text:

“Chapman et al. (2005) recently examined compliance with concomitant antihypertensive and lipid-lowering drug therapy in 8406 enrollees in a US-managed care plan […] Less than half of patients (44.7 per cent) were adherent with both therapies three months after medication initiation, a figure that decreased to 35.8 per cent at 12 months.”

September 7, 2016 - Posted by | books, diabetes, medicine

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: