Econstudentlog

Mammoths, Sabertooths, and Hominids: 65 Million Years of Mammalian Evolution in Europe

I’m currently reading this book. It’s quite nice so far, though the title is slightly misleading (I’ve read 82 pages so far and I’ve yet to come across any mammoths, sabertooths or hominids…). I mentioned yesterday that I wanted to cover the systems analysis text in more detail today, but that turned out to be really difficult to do without actually rewriting the book (or at the very least quoting very extensively), something I really don’t want to do. I decided to cover this book instead, though it’s admittedly slightly ‘lazy coverage’. Below I have added some links to stuff he talks about in the book. It’s the sort of book which is reasonably easy to blog, so I’m quite sure I’ll add more detail and context later, especially considering how most people presumably know far more (…okay, well, more) about the lives of the dinosaurs than they do about the lives of their much more recent ancestors, which lived during the Cenozoic.

The book frequently has more information about a given species/genus than does wikipedia’s corresponding article (and there’s stuff in here which wikipedia does not have articles about at all…), and/but I’ve tried to avoid linking to stubs below. Some articles below have decent coverage, but these are in general topics not well covered on wikipedia – I don’t think there’s a single featured article among the articles included. Even so, it’s probably worth having a look at some of the articles below if you’re curious to know which kind of stuff’s covered in this book. Aside from the links, I decided to also include a few pictures from the articles.

Paleocene.
Eocene.
Late Paleocene Thermal Maximum.
Turgai Strait.
Multituberculata.
Leptictidium.
Messel site.
Hyaenodon.

Hyaenodon_Heinrich_Harder
Pantolestidae.
Mixodectidae.
Condylarth.
Arctocyonidae.
Purgatorius.
Dyrosauridae.
Hypsodont.
Gastornis.

Gastornis,_a_large_flightless_bird_from_the_Eocene_of_Wyoming
Plesiadapis.
Pristichampsus.
Pantodonta.
Barylambda_BWMiacids.
Carnassial.
Coryphodon.
Alpine orogeny.
Phenacondus.
Perissodactyla.
Icaronycteris.
Palaeochiropteryx.

800px-Palaeochiropteryx_Paleoart
Adapidae.
Omomyidae.
Artiodactyla.
Palaeotherium.
Chalicotheres.
Eurotamandua.
Strigogyps.

February 13, 2015 - Posted by | biology, books, evolution, Paleontology, Zoology

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