Econstudentlog

Quotes

i. “Not being known doesn’t stop the truth from being true.” (Richard Bach)

ii. “Argue for your limitations, and sure enough, they’re yours.” (-ll-)

iii. “The best way to pay for a lovely moment is to enjoy it.” (-ll-)

iv. “Science kills credulity and superstition, but to the well-balanced mind it enhances the feeling of wonder, of veneration, and of kinship which we feel in the presence of the miraculous universe.” (John Burroughs)

v. “For certainly it is excellent discipline for an author to feel that he must say all he has to say in the fewest possible words, or his reader is sure to skip them; and in the plainest possible words, or his reader will certainly misunderstand them.” (John Ruskin)

vi. “A little group of wise hearts is better than a wilderness full of fools.” (-ll-)

vii. “One man’s remorse is another man’s reminiscence.” (Ogden Nash)

viii. “I believe that people believe what they believe they believe.” (-ll-)

ix. “That man is not truly brave who is afraid either to seem or to be, when it suits him, a coward.” (Edgar Allan Poe)

x. “A few Cobras in your home will soon clear it of Rats and Mice. Of course, you will still have the Cobras.” (Will Cuppy)

xi. “The Age of Reptiles ended because it had gone on long enough and it was all a mistake in the first place. A better day was dawning at the close of the Mesozoic Era. There were some little warm-blooded animals around which had been stealing and eating the eggs of the Dinosaurs, and they were gradually learning to steal other things, too. Civilization was just around the corner.” (-ll-)

xii. “Aristotle maintains that the neck of the Lion is composed of a single bone. Aristotle knew nothing at all about Lions, a circumstance which did not prevent him from writing a good deal on the subject. […] Aristotle was famous for knowing everything. He taught that the brain exists merely to cool the blood and is not involved in the process of thinking. This is true only of certain persons. […] Pliny the Elder described a Whale called “Balaena or Whirlpool, which is so long and broad as to take up more in length and breadth than two acres of ground.” This brings up again the old question: Are the classics doomed? Our ancestors believed that four years of this sort of information would inevitably produce a President, or at least a Cabinet Member. It didn’t seem to work out that way.” (-ll-)

xiii. “The Egyptians of the First Dynasty were already civilized in most respects. They had hieroglyphics, metal weapons for killing foreigners, numerous government officials, death, and taxes.” (-ll-)

xiv. “Egyptologists say they have no idea what Khufu was doing when he was not building pyramids, since he left no inscriptions describing his daily activities, and they would give a good deal to know. Then they say he had six wives and a harem full of concubines. They do not seem to make the connection, but you get it and I get it. We do not need any hieroglyphics to inform us that Khufu dropped around occasionally to see how things were getting along and to tell the ladies how many cubic yards of limestone he had laid that afternoon.” (-ll-)

xv. “They [the Pilgrim Fathers] believed in freedom of thought for themselves and for all other people who believed exactly as they did.” (-ll-)

xvi. “The best good that you can possibly achieve is not good enough if you have to strain yourself all the time to reach it. A thing is only worth doing, and doing again and again, if you can do it rather easily, and get some joy out of it.” (Don Marquis)

xvii. “The dearest ambition of a slave is not liberty but to have a slave of his own.” (Richard Francis Burton)

xviii. “The more I study religions the more I am convinced that man never worshipped anything but himself.” (-ll-)

xix. “He who sees only what is before his eyes sees the worst part of every view.” (Leslie Stephen)

xx. “History is indeed little more than the register of crimes, follies, and misfortunes of mankind.” (Edward Gibbon)

September 7, 2014 - Posted by | quotes

2 Comments »

  1. “For certainly it is excellent discipline for an author to feel that he must say all he has to say in the fewest possible words, or his reader is sure to skip them; and in the plainest possible words, or his reader will certainly misunderstand them.”

    Sometimes these two goals are mutually exclusive…

    Comment by Maxwell B. | September 8, 2014 | Reply

    • This is very true.

      On the other hand people often behave as if that objection is relevant even when it is not..

      Comment by US | September 8, 2014 | Reply


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