Econstudentlog

Some links

1.Stop following me! (awesome t-shirt)

2. Dung beetle.

“Dung beetles are beetles that feed partly or exclusively on feces. All of these species belong to the superfamily Scarabaeoidea; most of them to the subfamilies Scarabaeinae and Aphodiinae of the family Scarabaeidae. This beetle can also be referred to as the scarab beetle. As most species of Scarabaeinae feed exclusively on feces, that subfamily is often dubbed true dung beetles. There are dung-feeding beetles which belong to other families, such as the Geotrupidae (the earth-boring dung beetle). The Scarabaeinae alone comprises more than 5,000 species.[1]”

“Dung beetles can roll up to 50 times their weight.” Those animals are awesome!

3. Well, they had me fooled. Imagine being the curious Chinese 15-year-old who finds that page in a google search. Imagine that you have poor English skills, have no knowledge of what The Onion is and have very little knowledge about Ancient Greece.

4. Comparison of Weight-Loss Diets with Different Compositions of Fat, Protein, and Carbohydrates. Exactly what it says on the tin. Haven’t read the study yet, but it looks interesting. Here are some highlights:

“We randomly assigned 811 overweight adults to one of four diets; the targeted percentages of energy derived from fat, protein, and carbohydrates in the four diets were 20, 15, and 65%; 20, 25, and 55%; 40, 15, and 45%; and 40, 25, and 35%. The diets consisted of similar foods and met guidelines for cardiovascular health. The participants were offered group and individual instructional sessions for 2 years. […]

At 6 months, participants assigned to each diet had lost an average of 6 kg, which represented 7% of their initial weight; they began to regain weight after 12 months. By 2 years, weight loss remained similar in those who were assigned to a diet with 15% protein and those assigned to a diet with 25% protein (3.0 and 3.6 kg, respectively); in those assigned to a diet with 20% fat and those assigned to a diet with 40% fat (3.3 kg for both groups); and in those assigned to a diet with 65% carbohydrates and those assigned to a diet with 35% carbohydrates (2.9 and 3.4 kg, respectively) (P>0.20 for all comparisons). Among the 80% of participants who completed the trial, the average weight loss was 4 kg; 14 to 15% of the participants had a reduction of at least 10% of their initial body weight. Satiety, hunger, satisfaction with the diet, and attendance at group sessions were similar for all diets; attendance was strongly associated with weight loss (0.2 kg per session attended). The diets improved lipid-related risk factors and fasting insulin levels.

Conclusions
Reduced-calorie diets result in clinically meaningful weight loss regardless of which macronutrients they emphasize.” [my emphasis]

October 10, 2010 - Posted by | biology, data, evolution, health, wikipedia

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